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Égypt-actus
Égypt-actus
revue de presse sur l'actualité culturelle, archéologique, politique et sociale de l'Égypte
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Egypte : Elles font le mur

Egypte : Elles font le mur | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Quelques Égyptiennes gagnent la rue pour ne pas être oubliées de la révolution. Leurs seules armes : des pochoirs et des bombes de peinture. (...)

Les graffitis ont surgi en Egypte, en même temps que les premiers soulèvements. Parmi les amis du trentenaire, une majorité de garçons mais aussi quelques filles dont Aya, étudiante de 22 ans. Elle fignole le détail d’une fresque, entre deux blagues échangées avec ses potes. L’exercice ne semble pas la stresser. Pourtant à deux pas de là, des policiers quadrillent les abords du parlement. « Ils ne viendront pas parce que nous sommes là », rassure-t-elle, bravache. Sur la fresque, des soldats en armes, des petits hommes barbus visiblement énervés, une petite fille en robe rose et une colombe. Un résumé à grands traits des tensions et des espoirs qui sont encore latents en Egypte en ce mois de mai, quand nous réalisons ce reportage.

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Les graffiti : une arme politique dans les rues du Caire

Les graffiti : une arme politique dans les rues du Caire | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Since the 2011 uprising that overthrew Hosni Mubarak, Cairo’s exterior structures have become its canvas. On the third anniversary of that Egyptian Revolution, graffiti has exploded across the country, with Egyptian artists using their city’s walls to express everything from calls to revolution to outrage over sexual harassment.

Mohammad Mahmoud Street is a showcase of Egyptian street art. Politics. Social justice. Mourning. This is where Egyptian artists come to speak their minds.

The artist Ganzeer has painted some of the most iconic artworks of the revolution, including one on Mohammad Mahmoud. "You have these skulls and, in the midst of the skulls, you have one of the protest signs that was freedom, social justice, right there and a pile of skulls, and who’s responsible? Just a soldier, you know. It’s not Mubarak, it’s not the officer, ranks and whatever; it’s not the people who are making the decisions. It’s just a soldier following orders," he said.

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Egypt Today: Up Against the Wall

Egypt Today: Up Against the Wall | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Mia Gröndahl — officially — is a Swedish journalist, writer and photographer. Unofficially, she is a fire-eater, a chef, a rose expert and everything in between. Almost two years ago, I met Gröndahl most randomly in Cairo’s posh suburb of Zamalek.

 

Two friends of mine were doing graffiti one Friday morning and all of a sudden this cab stops and out jumps this foreign woman who went straight to the wall and asked to photograph it.

 

Conversation began and I discovered that this was the very same Gröndahl of Gaza Graffiti, the only book seriously focusing on Palestinian graffiti. And now she was doing the same for Egyptian graffiti, with her newest book Revolution Graffiti: Street Art of the New Egypt, released last month.

 

At first glance, you would not think that this prolific author would be the kind of person attracted to the graffiti world. Having published several books, Gröndahl has a noticeable wild streak to those paying attention and, curiously, sits comfortably amid the eccentric world of graffiti artists.

 

The Middle East has been her home for the last 15 years. Her interest in region began as a child and, at one point, she even contemplated becoming an Egyptologist. She made regular trips to the region before moving permanently to Jerusalem in 1996. She remembers photographing her first graffiti, a wedding piece, in Gaza in 1993.

 

“I felt immediately that I was attracted to it and I just wanted to continue with my camera and do it,” she recalls. “But, you know when you went to Gaza back then, there were so many important things.

 

You didn’t go with the camera to cover graffiti; you went because there was something very serious happening.  And, I didn’t take it seriously, so I felt I couldn’t start.” 

 

 

By 2000, she had realized that graffiti was a key player in the political life of Palestinians. “A lot of the young people who did graffiti in Gaza did it for the core reason that graffiti is made,” she explains,  “to let people know that ‘I Exist’ and with the graffiti, also, ‘I Resist’.”

 

 

From 2000, Gröndahl seriously documented graffiti until the aftermath of the 2009 war on Gaza. Then, it was possible for different opinions and views, but, today, Hamas is the dominant and only voice. The walls, Gröndahl sadly reminisces, are no longer as rich as they used to be.

 

(Egypt today)

 

More : http://www.egypttoday.com/article/artId:1075/Up-Against-the-Wall/secId:4/catId:37

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Egyptian Project - Ya Sahbi (The Walls Of Cairo)

Photos: Jérôme Ettinger / Togezer Productions (Camera: iPhone 4), November 2012 @ Mahmoud Bassiony Street, Cairo, Egypt.
Music: Egyptian Project "Ya Sahbi" from "Ya Amar" (Six Degrees Records 2012)
Lyrics: Sayed Emam
Composers: Jérôme Ettinger, Camille Momper, Ragab Sadek, Salama Metwally

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Born of revolution: Egypt's enlivened art scene

Born of revolution: Egypt's enlivened art scene | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

The Egyptian revolution meant not only a resurgence of the political scene inEgypt and the Arab world, but also the birth of a new kind of art. From the earliest days of the revolution people witnessed the colouring of the streets with slogans, revolutionary words and even poetry in the art form known as graffiti. Months later, the art transformed into another genre: political memes.

Designers and visual artists monitoring the political scene take famous comic quotes or commentaries and develop them into graphics. This form of art spreads through the internet, and Tumblr is one site frequently used.

Tumblr is a social media website based on the sharing of images, although one can also share text and videos. On the World Wide Web, Tumblr is the hipster of social media websites. Unlike Facebook or Twitter, it is used primarily by those who are artistic or creative. With the spark of the revolution, Egyptian Tumblr underwent a huge change.

Before January 2011, people shared dim black and white images of Om Kalthoum and Abdel Halim. Afterwards, people began to share graffiti snapshots and political memes portrayed in drawings, illustrations and repetitive gifs.

The Bassem Youssef show proved a fertile ground for such memes to develop, in addition to the jokes created by protesters and citizens.

One visual artist, Mohamed Gaber, also known as @gue3bara, said that for his Morsillini illustration (shown here), “the most inspiring source was Morsi himself; a hilarious muppet that inspires me every time I watch him on TV”.  

This work was also inspired by a Japanese Manga character, a figure he combined with Morsi to produce Morsillini. His work depends on “strong graphics carrying political messages for political and social awareness.”

Gaber uses Flicker and Twitter to share his work instead of Tumblr. He considers it a good website for inspiration, but one of the drawbacks is that “you do not find its content listed in the search results”. He also considers Tumblr to be a closed society, while Twitter and Facebook enable him to archive his work.  He has been basing art on political themes since 2007, but some of his older work such as Be with the Revolution became popular after the revolution.

The political aspect of life has become an integral part of every citizen’s life since 2011, and it is only natural that it seeps into our art, self-expression, and everyday life.  People not only stumbleupon political works of art, but also seek them out. They share art on social media websites, hoping that visual artists can express their thoughts in a way that they are unable to do themselves- in images.

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Egypte: Ce que disent les murs...

Al Qarra - Un art, un témoignage, un moyen d’expression coloré et engagé… Depuis la révolution qui a conduit à la chute du régime Moubarak il y aura bientôt deux ans, la peinture de rue a recouvert les murs du Caire. Simples graffitis ou imposantes fresques murales, devenus le symbole d’une liberté durement acquise. 

Mohammed Khaled, étudiant à l’institut des beaux-arts du Caire, graffeur:

« Le graffiti s’est développé grâce à la révolution. Le contenu est essentiellement politique et il change en fonction des événements, quand quelque chose se passe, les gens dessinent ce sujet, et puis ils le discutent ».

Diaa Elsayed, graffeur:

« J’aime dessiner et exprimer mes opinions d’une manière compliquée, alors quand quelqu’un voit mon travail, il commence à réfléchir pour déchiffrer son message et ceci en raison du travail acharné que j’ai fait. »

Véritables baromètres de l’humeur de la rue, les murs diffusent des mots d’ordre, dénoncent la répression. La plupart retracent les grandes heures du soulèvement populaire, rendent hommage à ses héros, caricaturent, sans détour, puissants d’hier et d’aujourd’hui. La démarche a tendance à irriter les nouvelles autorités égyptiennes. Les œuvres les plus controversées sont régulièrement effacées, jamais pour bien longtemps.

Mohammed Khaled, graffeur :

« Si on efface un de mes dessins, je comprends alors qu’il a dérangé le gouvernement. Un de mes dessins à Zamalek, a été effacé deux ou trois fois, et à chaque fois qu’ils l’effacent, on ne se contente pas de le redessiner, mais on le développe. »

L’université américaine du Caire, dont les murs ont été largement utilisés par les peintres, a choisi de rendre hommage à cet art de rue si spontané. Elle lui dédie son calendrier 2013, orné des œuvres parmi les plus remarquables, dont certaines ont aujourd’hui disparu.

 

Par Jihane Boudraa

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Sur les murs du Caire, les graffitis racontent une révolution inachevée

Sur les murs du Caire, les graffitis racontent une révolution inachevée | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

En trois phrases peintes sur un mur du Caire, un graffiti résume deux ans de combats, d'espoirs, de désillusions: "2011: A bas Moubarak. 2012: A bas le pouvoir militaire. 2013: A bas le pouvoir des Frères musulmans".

Egypt-actus's insight:

Dans l'Egypte qui marque vendredi le deuxième anniversaire du début de la révolte qui fit chuter Hosni Moubarak, la peinture de rue est devenue le refuge de l'information et de l'art alternatifs.

A deux pas de la désormais célèbre place Tahrir, simples graffitis ou véritables fresques murales retracent les grandes heures du soulèvement populaire, rendent hommage à ses héros, décrivent des batailles de rue, caricaturent les puissants d'hier et d'aujourd'hui.

"Les graffitis sont apparus avec la révolution. Leur contenu est avant tout politique, mais il change en fonction des événements", raconte Mohamed Khaled, étudiant à l'institut des beaux-arts du Caire.

"Quand quelque chose se passe, les gens sortent et dessinent, et ensuite on en parle", ajoute-t-il.

Les murs de nombreux bâtiments donnent ainsi l'humeur de la rue "révolutionnaire", diffusent les mots d'ordre, dénoncent la répression.

Fin 2012, la présidence égyptienne en a fait les frais, peu après que le chef de l'Etat islamiste Mohamed Morsi eut décidé de se doter temporairement de pouvoirs exceptionnels.

Caricatures sur le mur du palais présidentiel

Armés d'escabeaux et de pots de peinture, les manifestants ont pris d'assaut le mur d'enceinte du palais pour le recouvrir de caricatures du président en pharaon, en pyromane ou en mouton.

Les partisans de M. Morsi et des employés du palais ont rapidement effacé les oeuvres irrévérencieuses, qui continuent toutefois de fleurir en d'autres endroits de la ville, faisant le bonheur des badauds comme des touristes.

La mort de 74 personnes lors d'affrontements à l'issue d'un match de football à Port-Saïd l'an dernier reste un thème récurrent des peintures murales, avec des portraits stylisés des victimes et des appels à ce que justice soit faite.

Les murs de blocs de béton utilisés par la police pour barrer certaines rues lors de manifestations sont mis à profit pour peindre des paysages en trompe-l'oeil, ou tournés en dérision avec des peintures enfantines.

L'université américaine du Caire, dont les murs ont été largement utilisés par les peintres, a rendu hommage à l'art de rue en publiant un calendrier 2013 orné des oeuvres parmi les plus remarquables, dont certaines ont aujourd'hui disparu.

"La créativité ne cesse de progresser, de même que les matériels et les produits utilisés, car les gens veulent s'exprimer", affirme Diaa el-Sayyed, qui a abandonné des études d'informatique pour se lancer dans cette forme d'art.

Cette liberté aurait été impensable du temps de Hosni Moubarak, mais elle continue d'irriter les nouvelles autorités, qui font régulièrement effacer ou recouvrir les graffitis les plus controversés.

Mais les rectangles de peinture blanche toute fraîche en disent tout aussi long que les oeuvres qu'ils sont sensés masquer, estiment certains.

"Si l'une de mes oeuvres est effacée, alors je sais qu'elle a provoqué quelque chose", estime Mohamed Khaled. 'AFP, via La Croix)

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Le visage féminin du street art en Egypte

Le visage féminin du street art en Egypte | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Suzeeinthestreet , un blog sur le thème du streetart en Egypte, dénonce le traitement médiatique de la participation des femmes à la révolution, depuis bientôt deux ans.

Parallèlement, les graffeuses égyptiennes, très engagées, font de plus en plus parler d'elles.

Selon la blogueuse, les femmes n'ont pas «expérimenté un "réveil" depuis la révolution, mais de toute évidence elles ont dû se battre plus durement.»

C'est le cas du collectif NooNeswa  F (pour femme) créé en mars 2012. Un an plus tôt, 17 manifestantes se voyaient imposer un «test de virginité», un «viol déguisé», précise le site du magazine français Le point .

La création de Nooneswa rendait ainsi hommage à Samira Ibrahim, première égyptienne à témoigner contre ces tests, et à porter plainte. Pour faire progresser l'égalité homme-femme, le collectif choisit de représenter figures féminines charismatiques en Egypte, à l'instar de l'actrice Soad Hosni.

 
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Le street art au féminin dans les rues du Caire

Le street art au féminin dans les rues du Caire | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Since the revolution began in 2011, Cairo has witnessed a blossoming of street art expressing voices from many segments of Egyptian society and social movements. The women’s movement, defined in broad terms, was among the first to express its messages of anti-harassment, anti-brutality and freedom of agency on the city’s walls.

Many of the images have gone as quickly as they’ve come due to weekly repainting projects by the Ministry of Interior, but luckily they were documented in time by savior photographers and will now live on forever on the interwebz.



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Keiser, le "Banksy égyptien"

Keiser, le "Banksy égyptien" | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Le samedi 25 janvier 2014, l'Egypte célébrera le troisième anniversaire de sa révolution ayant chassé Hosni Moubarak du pouvoir.

Une journée qui s’annonce sous haute tension, alors que le conflit fait rage les partisans des Frères musulmans et ceux de l’armée et que plusieurs explosions ont fait trembler aujourd’hui la capitale égyptienne.

C’est dans les rues de cette même ville que le graffeur "Keiseur" dégaine ses bombes à lui depuis trois ans, pleines de peinture celles-ci.

Considéré par certains comme le "Banksy égyptien", il signe les murs de la pointe de son art, laissant derrière lui des messages politiques, sociaux et souvent subliminaux.

 
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Graffiti in Cairo's Mohamad Mahmoud Street - "Homophobia is not Revolutionary"

Graffiti in Cairo's Mohamad Mahmoud Street - "Homophobia is not Revolutionary" | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it
Egypt-actus's insight:

Source : Ahmed Shihab-Eldin (Twitter)

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"Revolution Graffiti - Street Art of the New Egypt", by Mia Gröndahl

"Revolution Graffiti - Street Art of the New Egypt", by Mia Gröndahl | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

A visual celebration of the art and artists of the walls of the new Egypt, by the photographer of Gaza Graffiti and Tahrir Square 

The Egyptian Revolution that began on 25 January 2011 immediately gave rise to a wave of popular political and social expression in the form of graffiti and street art, phenomena that were almost unknown in the country under the old regime. Mia Gröndahl, the photographer ofGaza Graffiti: Messages of Love and Politicsand Tahrir Square: The Heart of the Egyptian Revolution, has followed and documented the constantly and rapidly changing graffiti art of the new Egypt from its beginnings, and here in more than 400 full-color images celebrates the imagination, the skill, the humor, and the political will of the young artists and activists who have claimed the walls of Cairo and other Egyptian cities as their canvas.

From the simplest hand-written messages, through stencils and martyr portraits, to the elaborate murals of Mohamed Mahmoud Street, the messages on the walls are presented in themed sections—Revolution & Freedom, Egyptian & Proud, Martyrs & Heroes, Cross & Crescent, Think & Think Again—punctuated by interviews with some of the individual artists whose work has broken fresh ground.

The American University in Cairo Press, 2013, 224 p.

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Alexandria Re-Imagined: The Revolution through Art, by Amro Ali

Alexandria Re-Imagined: The Revolution through Art, by Amro Ali | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

On 24 January 2011 – a day before the arc of Egyptian history would be altered – the film Microphone was screened. Microphone documents Alexandria’s pre-revolution underground scene of artists and musicians fighting a passive oppression that suffocates their ability to nurture their creativity. Khaled (played by Khaled Abol Naga), who has returned to Egypt from the US, wishes to aid the youth by providing them with a venue and funding for nurturing their talents. In one scene, Khaled is conversing with an official at the state’s cultural office to request support for his project. The dialogue proceeds as follows:

Egypt-actus's insight:

Official: What is this graffiti? Is our role to pollute the walls or to clean them?

Khaled: “Graffiti is an art, the whole world acknowledges it. We have to encourage the youth in their pursuits”

Official: “Is this not transgression against people and properties, and visual pollution?

Khaled: “What about the campaign posters littered around the country’s walls, isn’t that visual pollution as well?”

Official: “No, that is something and this is something else. Election campaigning is part of our democratic process”

To the dumbfound look of Khaled who - frustrated enough by red tape  - now is expected to digest a bureaucrat’s talk of “democracy” in Hosni Mubarak's Egypt 

Prior to the revolution, Alexandria’s walls were largely Soviet-esqe and barren. Artists who did attempt to paint the walls, like Aya Tarek (featured in the film) and Amr Ali (not the author of this piece), were often stopped by the police or reported by onlookers suspicious of their novel activity. Fatma Hendawy, a curator who started on the street scene before the revolution, notes that one way to circumvent these obstacles was to go through the Goethe Institute to use its diplomatic muscle to define joint German-Egyptian art projects. Yet as Fatma laments, such institutes inadvertently stump your creativity in order to cater to their bilateral agendas.

In the months following the 2011 Revolution, I took to cataloguing the artwork that blossomed and inspired me to believe that the public space was gradually being reclaimed by society. I am no artist; however, I take the position of the “public” and write on the art in the context of the socio-political dynamics and nuances that influence societal perceptions of street art. Specifically, this essay attempts to tell the story of the past two years purely through artwork from the streets of Alexandria. For Cairo, I highly recommend the large collection of Suzee Morayef who, on her blog, offers great analyses on street art that is prolific through the capital’s streets. Also Mona Abaza, professor of sociology at the American University in Cairo, has penned brilliant pieces on the artistic narration of the revolution.

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Street art: Gutsy graffiti captures evolution of Egypt uprising

Street art: Gutsy graffiti captures evolution of Egypt uprising | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it
Egypt-actus's insight:

In just three sentences on a large wall in Cairo, the artist sums up the evolution of the Egyptian revolt: "2011, Down with Mubarak's rule. 2012, Down with military rule. 2013, Down with Brotherhood rule."

Since the start of the popular uprising that toppled Hosni Mubarak, street art has become the newest form of alternative media, documenting events, struggles, highs and lows with political messages that are as gutsy as they are colourful.

The urban canvasses tell the story from the huge anti-Mubarak protests on January 25, 2011 to the strongman's resignation 18 days later, the electrifying sense of victory that followed to the disappointment and anger at the interim military rulers.

Painted scenes depict the bloody battles, stencils pay homage to activists who died and graffiti calls for the trials of those seen to have escaped justice.

On any given day, the walls in the streets surrounding Cairo's iconic Tahrir Square deliver the revolutionary headlines of the day and serve as a central mood monitor.

From scribbles in black spray paint to elaborate colourful murals, there are messages everywhere and it seems all surfaces -- walls, railings, traffic signs -- have become legitimate expression boards.

 

More : http://www.middle-east-online.com/english/?id=56607

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Making the city ‘home’: Redefining public art between the state, businesses and the people

Making the city ‘home’: Redefining public art between the state, businesses and the people | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it
Artist Omneia Naguib wants to “occupy the sky” by moving the familiar language of the street — imprints of political posters and common graffiti motifs — onto the grandiose billboard spaces typically reserved for those with power and money.
Egypt-actus's insight:

Protesters are placing eye patches, a symbol of their injuries, on the Qasr al-Nil lion statues, and pedestrians seek shadow underneath them or shower in a fountain in one of Cairo’s roundabouts. The domineering vision of the state and private corporations of what constitutes public art has opened up since the January revolution began.

Activists, residents and artists alike are all negotiating public space and art to send out their messages, connect more closely with their communities or simply feel at home.

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