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Égypt-actus
revue de presse sur l'actualité culturelle, archéologique, politique et sociale de l'Égypte
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Une équipe d'archéologues allemands a découvert des pièces manquantes des célèbres Colosses de Memnon

Une équipe d'archéologues allemands a découvert des pièces manquantes des célèbres Colosses de Memnon | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

The Egyptian minister of antiquities announces that a team of German archaeologists has discovered missing pieces belonging to the famed Colossi of Memnon. The statues, dating to roughly 1350 BC, were damaged in an earthquake during the Roman era.

The colossi are some of Egypt's oldest touristic attractions, drawing tourists since ancient times. The twin statues, over 18 meters (60 feet) tall each, are of Pharaoh Amenhotep III, who was worshipped as a deity. The statues are the only remains of a large temple that was built in memorial of the pharaoh.

Minister of Antiquities Mohammed Ibrahim says Sunday the team made the discovery in cooperation with archaeologists from Egypt's Ministry of Antiquities. He said the pieces belong to the belt of one statue, and the base of the other.

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أعلن د. محمد إبراهيم وزير الآثار، اكتشاف كتل حجرية تمثل بعض الاجزاء المفقودة من التمثال الشمالي  من تمثالي  ممنون والذي يتصدرمدخل معبد امنحتب الثالث  بالبر الغربي بالأقصر، وهي عباره عن كتل  كوارتزية  تمثل الاجزاء المفقودة  من  زراع التمثال الأيمن واجزاء  من حزامه الملكي المزخرف.

أوضح  د. إبراهيم  أن الكشف  حققته البعثة الألمانية بالتعاون مع وزارة  الآثار ، مشيراً إلي أن هذه الأجزاء فقدت في العهد القديم علي إثر زلزال  أدي إلي انهيار معبد أمنحتب الثالث بالكامل، والذي لم  يتبق منه سوي تمثالي ممنون اللذان  كانا يتصدران مدخل الصرح الأول للمعبد  واللذان تم نحتهما باستخدام كتل من حجر الكوارتزيت جلبت خصيصا  من الجبل الأحمر بالقاهرة، الي أن وقع الزلزال  والذي أدي إلي تحطم وسقوط الأجزاء التي تم الكشف عنها مؤخراً، لافتا الي  أنه جاري الآن تنفيذ مشروع لإعادة الأجزاء المكتشفة من التمثال إلي أماكنها الأصلية باستخدام احدث طرق الترميم .

ومن جانبه أوضح علي الأصفر، رئيس قطاع الآثار المصرية أن ابعاد الكتل المكتشفة  تتراوح ما بين 88سم ارتفاعاً و  76سم عرضاً، مشيرا الي ان البعثة كشفت أيضاً عن  أجزاء من التاج الملكي وأجزاء أخري من قاعدة التمثالين، لافتا الي ان هذا الكشف يعد  من الاكتشافات الهامة التي تضاف إلي ما تم الكشف عنه في الفترة الماضية في ذات المنطقة من بينها الكشف عن 14 تمثال للملك امنحتب الثالث  عثر عليها في الجنوب من  تمثالي ممنون. 

كما أوضح عبد الحكيم كرار، مدير عام آثار منطقة الأقصر أن مشروع ترميم تمثالي ممنون ومعبد أمنحتب الثالث  يجري تنفيذه على يد فريق عمل مصري أوروبي برئاسة د. هوريج سوروزيان وذلك في إطار  مشروع ضخم لاجراء أعمال الحفائر  بالمناطق المحيطة بالتمثالين للكشف عن أي آثار تخص معبد أمنحتب الثالث الذي دمر بفعل أحد الزلازل الواقعة  قديماً.

 

https://www.facebook.com/notes/ministry-of-antiquitie-

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This week in 1900: Architect Hassan Fathy is born

This week in 1900: Architect Hassan Fathy is born | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Fathy’s search for an architectural identity was not only centered on how to build a house. He was concerned with how to transform people’s lives, economically, socially and culturally.

These ideas were implemented in his New Gourna project in Luxor, which he started after World War II. The old village of Gourna, located at the heart of archaeological sites on the hills, worried authorities due to residents’ repeated attempts to loot ancient Egyptian tombs.

Fathy proposed to use architecture to create new ways of living for these residents, offering them economic opportunities and, at the same time, initiating Egyptian-inspired architecture.

He said a house’s architecture should respect the “role of traditions.” For him, that meant respecting local realities and finding solutions that did not threaten them. One such reality in Upper Egypt, for example, meant that relatives preferred to have their houses close to each other. He argued — and here, he played the role of an anthropologist — that “the need for protection from nature and other men, both for themselves and for their cattle, is reflected in the way the houses and villages open inward toward the center and turn their backs on the outside world.”

 

Ahmed Zaki Osman / Egypt independent

More : http://www.egyptindependent.com/news/week-1900-architect-hassan-fathy-born

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"Le Caire dessiné et photographié au XIXe siècle", sous la direction de Mercedes Volait

"Le Caire dessiné et photographié au XIXe siècle", sous la direction de Mercedes Volait | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it
Egypt-actus's insight:

Editions A&J Picard, 2013, 400 pages

Depuis la grande expédition d'Egypte qui marqua les esprits, seuls des voyageurs aussi célèbres que Maxime Du Camp et Gustave Flaubert sont restés dans les mémoires, alors que d'autres sont complètement oubliés ou connus des seuls spécialistes. Pourtant leurs travaux restent des sources irremplaçables sur une ville en grande partie disparue. En effet, tout au long du XIXe siècle, beaucoup de monuments périrent faute d'entretien et à partir des années 1870, le khédive Ismaïl entreprit des travaux d'embellissement pour donner à la capitale de l'Egypte un aspect européen, au prix d'importantes démolitions. 
Tous ces voyageurs, architectes, peintres, "antiquaires", furent subjugués par l'architecture médiévale du Caire et par le décor géométrique de ses bâtiments civils ou religieux. Ils tentèrent à travers leurs dessins, photographies et relevés de faire connaître ces richesses artistiques que certains prévoyaient de publier dans des recueils, dont quelques-uns virent le jour. Ce livre a pour vocation de sortir de l'ombre ces passionnés qui offrent encore aujourd'hui des témoignages uniques assortis souvent de descriptions de dessins, de photographies ou d'écrits théoriques en règle générale peu accessibles. 
Un ensemble de spécialistes met ici en valeur ces documents tombés dans l'oubli et présente des synthèses de leurs oeuvres et de leurs apports à la connaissance du Caire médiéval.

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Hassan Fathy's New Gourna

Last January the Gezira Art Center hosted an exhibition and a series of events aboutarchitect Hassan Fathy and his work. Hassan Fathy is perhaps Egypt’s most renowned architect from the 20th century, but why?

The exhibition was beautifully curated and organized with images, text, models, video projection, as well as samples of Fathy’s mud bricks, the most essential element of his constructions. Fathy’s 1945 housing project for the relocation of the village of Gourna in Luxor was his most famous and internationally renowned project. The village which has fallen into disrepair (watch video above) is currently the focus of a UNESCO rehabilitation and documentation project. Gourna was not a project free of controversy nor was it a success, at least for the intended inhabitants of the village. Fathy left no mark on Egypt’s urban centers: Cairo and Alexandria don’t have examples of Fathy’s architecture, his ideas printed in his “Gourna, tale of two villages” (later published by the Chicago University Press with the condescending title “Architecture for the poor”) have failed to produce any practical solutions for Egypt’s urban and housing problems. Despite this underwhelming record, Fathy’s oeuvre is celebrated in the West as an example of “other/vernacular modernism” and is celebrated in Egypt mostly by his students as authentic modernity/spirited continuity with the past.

It is difficult to fully comprehend why Hassan Fathy overshadows his contemporary architects who had successful practices, built many buildings and engaged in current discourses (Ali Labib Gabr, Antoine Selim Nahas). Fathy also overshadows his colleague Ramses Wissa Wassef (who like Fathy engaged with the question of vernacular architecture and perhaps was more successful in balancing modern practicality with vernacular identity without falling in the trap of essentialism). Finally, one of Egypt’s most influential architects of the modern period, Mustafa Fahmy, will never make an appearance in a Western curriculum of the history of modern architecture nor in an Egyptian exhibit, yet Hassan Fathy might. How can this selective celebration of a figure with little impact on his community and profession be explained?

The legend, the myths

Fathy had interesting ideas about architecture, there is no denying this fact. But he wasn’t the only one with interesting ideas in 20th century Egyptian architecture. Fathy had a strong following of students, particularly in the 1970s when the notion of vernacular modernism was emerging in Western academia coinciding with proclamations of the failure/death of high-modernism along with the birth of post-modernism. Egypt, like many countries, particularly those who had recently experienced heavy-handed state-led development in post-revolution or post-independence “third world” societies, experienced high-modernism withdrawal.

Over the past couple of decades there have been numerous articles keeping the memory of Hassan Fathy alive. Nearly every six months there is a new piece regurgitating a long list of myths and stereotypes about Fathy as the ONLY architect worth remembering, as a founder of green-environmentally friendly architecture in Egypt, as the symbol of authenticity and culturally sensitive design, and as the humble architect who worked with people to realize his designs.

 

(CairObserver)

http://cairobserver.com/post/39866891829/hassan-fathy-architecture-for-the-rich#.UOnvXA-Ri5k.twitter

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Exposition : "Photographier la ville arabe au 19e siècle"‏ au Centre Canadien d'Architecture

Exposition : "Photographier la ville arabe au 19e siècle"‏ au Centre Canadien d'Architecture | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Du 30 janvier au 25 mai 2014, l’exposition Photographier la ville arabe au 19e siècle au CCA présente les débuts de la photographie au Moyen-Orient et en Afrique du Nord : une période durant laquelle les photographes, qu’ils soient amateurs, pèlerins, membres de missions scientifiques ou photographes commerciaux, voyagèrent vers ces régions et rapportèrent leurs impressions de voyage. Sous le commissariat de Jorge Correia, professeur associé à l’école d’architecture de l’Université de Minho (Escola de Arquitectura da Universidade do Minho – EAUM) au Portugal, l’exposition interprète la manière dont la ville islamique traditionnelle a été représentée par différents photographes européens (dont Francis Frith, Emile Béchard, Félix Bonfils et Maxime du Camp). (...)

Une cinquantaine de photographies tirée de la collection du CCA sont présentées et exposée sous la forme d’images individuelles, de planches détachées, d’albums et de portfolios, qui présentent les principales villes arabes du 19e siècle dont Le Caire et Damas. Parmi ces images, on reconnaîtra les toutes premières méthodes d’impression et de diffusion photographiques : papiers salés, papiers albuminés, tirages photomécaniques, plaques pour lanternes de projection et cartes stéréoscopiques. Il est à noter que ces photographies font partie d’un corpus plus important sur le Moyen-Orient. Leur acquisition au tout début de la formation de la Collection du CCA (dans les années 70 et 80), témoigne de leur valeur et pertinence pour l’institution. La sélection de photographies livre un portrait de la réalité urbaine et de l’organisation de la ville telles qu’elles existaient il y a un siècle et demi, et fait apparaître une nette distinction entre le territoire public – halal, ce qui est permis ou profane -, et le haram – le privé, l’interdit ou la sphère du sacré. Comme l’explique Correia, « cette dichotomie est présente à tous les niveaux de la culture islamique et donc dans l’organisation de la ville depuis ses frontières jusqu’à ses voies et à ses constructions».


Centre Canadien d’Architecture
1920, rue Baile
Montréal, Québec
H3H 2S6

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"Vocabulaire d'architecture égyptienne", par Franck Monnier

"Vocabulaire d'architecture égyptienne", par Franck Monnier | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it
Egypt-actus's insight:

Ce manuel se veut être un guide pour l’étudiant, le chercheur et l’égyptologue qui souhaitent employer avec toute la rigueur nécessaire les termes relatifs aux éléments de l’architecture égyptienne de la période prédynastique à la période romaine. Il se veut également utile à tous les passionnés qui, au travers de la lecture d’ouvrages abordant de près ou de loin ce type d’architecture, sont amenés à rencontrer des termes spécialisés dont il est souvent très difficile de trouver une définition claire et précise. 
Ce livre, agrémenté d’une centaine de photographies et d’une centaine de dessins explicatifs, compile près de 900 termes dont la recherche peut s’opérer intuitivement et de diverses façons. Ceux‑ci sont catégorisés suivant leur appartenance à un type particulier d’architecture, mais figurent également en ordre alphabétique dans plusieurs index : français/anglais, anglais/français et égyptien hiéroglyphique/français. Aux définitions s’adjoignent occasionnellement desdiscussions sur les termes correspondants, afin de juger de leur pertinence et ainsi fixer leur usage.

 

Editions Safran, 2013, 304 pages

 

Visualiser quelques pages en PDF : http://www.safran.be/pdf/PREC02.pdf

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Online course : The Art and Architecture of Ancient Egypt

Online course : The Art and Architecture of Ancient Egypt | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Sunday, January 13, 2013 9:00 am – Sunday, March 10, 2013

 

Where:Oriental Institute
1155 East 58th Street, Chicago, IL

 

Description:*This course does not require the participant 
The beauty and distinctiveness of ancient Egyptian art and architecture are among this great civilization’s most lasting legacies. Join us for an eight-week online course that provides an introduction to the history and development of ancient Egyptian art and architecture over a time span of 4,000 years. Use in-depth online tutorials, readings, and online discussions to explore a wide range of resources-from royal monuments to private art. We will investigate iconography, style, materials, and techniques within the broader context of their cultural significance in ancient Egyptian society.

Egypt-actus's insight:

Tuition is $295 for Oriental Institute members, $345 for non-members.

This asynchronous eight-week online course will begin on Sunday, January 13, 2013, and continue through Sunday, March 10, 2013. Preregistration is required. The registration deadline is Friday, January 4, 2013. Course participants must have a reliable Internet connection, a technical facility with computers and downloading software, as well as the ability to navigate the Internet as a learning tool. To register or to learn more about this online opportunity and its technical requirements, please contact the Oriental Public Education Office at 773.702.9507 or oi-education@uchicago.edu. 

Instructor:Megaera Lorenz 
Ms. Lorenz is a PhD candidate in Egyptology at the University of Chicago. She has excavated in Egypt and Sudan and has taught classes about ancient Egyptian language and history at the University of Chicago and Loyola University, Chicago.

https://oi.uchicago.edu/order/classes/Cost:$295 for Oriental Institute members, $345 for non-members WebsiteContact:Oriental Institute - Public Education Office
773-702-9507Calendars:OI, Arts, Featured - Arts, Short Courses, Workshops Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance. For events on the Student Events Calendar, please contact ORCSA at (773) 702-8787. 
Information on Assistive Listening Device  

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Last days : exhibition "Egypt in England"

Last days : exhibition "Egypt in England" | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it
From cinemas to cemeteries, factories to furnishings, a new exhibition at London's Wellington Arch explores the influence of Ancient Egypt on English architecture and interiors.
Egypt-actus's insight:

Ninety years ago, the British discovery of Tutankhamun's tomb triggered Egyptomania. Yet Egypt in England (7 November 2012 - 13 January 2013) shows that the Egyptian style first came into popularity following Napoleon's invasion of Egypt in 1798 and had been used before that in the 18th century gardens of wealthy English landowners. The exhibition traces the use of the style through to such 20th century commercial temples as cinemas and shops.

Photographs of Egyptian-style buildings and landmarks across England are on display alongside images of the buildings and the architectural sources from Ancient Egypt that inspired them. Vintage travel brochures illustrate the development of organised tourism to Egypt during the 19th century while a number of shabtis - the small decorative mummy-like figures placed in tombs and often taken home by early tourists as souvenirs - are also on display. Wedgwood ceramics are among the examples of the Egyptian style in the decorative arts.

 

Egypt in England is at The Quadriga Gallery, Wellington Arch from to 13 January 2013

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