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Égypt-actus
revue de presse sur l'actualité culturelle, archéologique, politique et sociale de l'Égypte
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Shia Oppression in Egypt: Now More than Before

Egypt, a home country of many scholars and place birth of civilizations, is threatening its brilliant history by targeting Egyptian Shia.

Home to the Fatimid Empire, one of the most important imperials that was established and led by Shia Muslim leaders, it is publicly fighting the Shia faith. Change of government in Egypt was meant to bring much needed democracy and freedom to the country. Shia Muslims, as any other Egyptian, hoped the new government would keep its promises for freedom and democracy. It would become a place where Shia could peacefully practice their faith. However, now, more than before Shia Muslims are being arrested, suppressed, and advertised as Non-Muslim.

Although the Egyptian Constitution, under Article 46, provides for freedom of belief and the practice of religious rites, Shia Muslims are a minority group that is not allowed to practice their faith in public or in private Islamic centers. Salafi's and government backed clerics speared hate messages among the public to the point where most Egyptians think Shia are not even Muslim even though they believe in the same God, Quran, practice Hadj, daily prayers and Ramadhan fasting. Every day, more and more pictures, webinars and ads are posted on the internet in display of the anti-Shi’ism is growth in Egypt.

 

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More : http://www.scoop.co.nz/stories/WO1304/S00091/shia-oppression-in-egypt-now-more-than-before.htm

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La vie de Mahomet à l’écran, versions Qatar et Iran, sunnite et chiite - Rue89

La vie de Mahomet à l’écran, versions Qatar et Iran, sunnite et chiite - Rue89 | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Le schisme de l’islam s’étend même au cinéma. Pas moins de deux versions de la vie du prophète Mahomet sont en préparation, sans doute en réponse au film d’un Egyptien-Américain de confession copte qui avait enflammé le monde musulman à l’automne dernier.

Les deux films en préparation sont très différents : l’un est financée avec un méga-budget par le Qatar (who else ?), l’autre avec des moyens plus modestes, par l’Iran. Il ne s’agit pas de concurrence cinématographique seulement, mais aussi théologique puisque le Qatar se positionne comme chef de file des musulmans sunnites, et l’Iran est le centre politique du monde chiite.

Selon le quotidien britannique The Guardian, le film produit par le Qatar aurait un budget d’un milliard de dollars, et a été confié, pour l’orthodoxie religieuse, au théologien sunnite égyptien Youssef Al Qaradawi, qui est déjà consultant auprès dela chaîne qatarie Al Jazeera.

Pour sa part, l’Iran a un petit coup d’avance puisque le film est déjà en cours de tournage, avec un budget de 30 millions de dollars seulement, et confié au réalisateur Majid Majidi. Selon le Guardian, en raison de la doctrine chiite plus « libérale », le film iranien montrera le prophète, mais pas son visage, alors que les sunnites interdisent toute représentation de Mahomet.

On attend donc avec impatience de pouvoir comparer les deux films.

 

http://www.rue89.com/2013/03/15/la-vie-de-mahomet-lecran-versions-qatar-et-iran-sunnite-et-chiite-240586

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Safwat Hegazy: Shia Islam is 'blasphemy'

Safwat Hegazy: Shia Islam is 'blasphemy' | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Salafi Preacher Safwat Hegazy said on Monday that Shia Islam “will never exist in Egypt,” reacting to the recent visit by Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad.

“Any country’s intervention in another country to spread its own doctrine means either that this country has a new religion to spread or that it believes the old religion is more valid,” he said.

In an interview with the satellite channel Al-Arabiya, Hegazy claimed that the World Federation of Muslim Scholars has researched Shia Islam within the Sunni world, alleging that “the research includes numbers that refer to what Iran does to turn Sunnis to Shias.”

“Were there Shias in Egypt 20 years ago?” he asked rhetorically, before claiming that there were no Egyptian Shias in 1973 and slamming Shia Islam as “blasphemous” and “wrong.”

Hegazy also accused Shias of being paid by Iran, without offering evidence, and said that Shias visit Egypt to perform “blasphemy.”

By contrast, Hegazy said that Wahhabism is a Sunni school and not a new religion. He also said that he would welcome the spread of the Hanbali school of Sunni Islam, since it was not a “blasphemous” one. (Egypt independent)

 

More : http://www.egyptindependent.com/news/safwat-hegazy-shia-islam-blasphemy

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Should Egypt fear Iran?

Should Egypt fear Iran? | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Two of the most important countries in the Middle East, Egypt and Iran, have begun using tourism as a tool for normalizing relations.

 

Flights have finally started up again after a break of 34 years and Iranian tourists have started to visit Egypt again. Many believe that these types of reciprocal visits will pave the way forward for the peoples of both countries to begin to understand one another and thus for the development of diplomatic relations.

 

At the same though, despite Tehran’s strong desires to see relations developed further with Egypt, the fact remains that there exists a serious anti-Iranian stance in Egyptian public opinion. Behind this public opinion is the idea that once relations improve between the two countries, Iran will use it as an opportunity to spread Shiism. Is there any real basis for this fear? There absolutely is. Though the exact numbers are not known, it is said that there are more than 10 million members of various Sufi orders throughout Egypt. It is also said that the majority of these people are not literate. And this fact creates mistrust in Iran, which sees spreading Shiism as an important part of its strategy to widen its spheres of influence.

 

For many centuries now, Iran has backed Shiism-related activities that promote its beliefs -- sometimes openly, sometimes secretly -- throughout a wide Islamic region, including of course Turkey. And Egypt, which was at one time the center of the Shiite Fatimid caliphate, has always been an important target for Iran (...) It is now feared that Iranian tourists could play the main role in helping the spread of Shiism throughout Egypt. Which is why it is being said that Egyptian officials are really only going to allow Iranian tourists to head to more designated touristic areas like Sharm el-Sheikh, Luxor and Aswan. At the same time, though, for an Egypt trying to bring in more tourism, and trying also to improve its diplomatic relations with Iran, it does not appear very possible to limit Iranian visitors to these touristic regions

 

More on: http://www.todayszaman.com/columnist-311872-should-egypt-fear-iran.html

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Shia-Sunni Friction Growing In Egypt

Shia-Sunni Friction Growing In Egypt | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Some of Egypt's leading Islamist parties are planning a demonstration this week in Tahrir Square to protest what they believe are warming relations between Iran and Egypt. Their concerns are not focused solely on a possible diplomatic rapprochement, but what they fear more -- creeping Shiism in Sunni lands.

Since the Egyptian revolution, Sunni animosity in Egypt toward Shia Muslims has increased and gone public in a country where, in the past, doctrinal differences between the two Islamic sects were barely mentioned.

Even at al Azhar, the mosque and university complex that is a seat for Sunni learning and where Shia jurisprudence is taught as part of the curriculum, there is far less tolerance than in the past.

"You can't trust the Shia because of taqiya," a scholar at Al Azhar told me in February when I was in Cairo. He was referring to a practice permitted in Shia Islam whereby followers may deny or otherwise obscure their religious beliefs if they feel they are under threat of persecution.

The dispensation of taqiya was particularly important historically because the Shia often lived as minorities in Sunni-dominated societies, as is the case in Egypt and much of the Arab world. The concept of taqiya does not exist in Sunni jurisprudence, but the practice of self-preservation is not unknown.

The Egyptian government under former President Hosni Mubarak considered Iran its enemy for different reasons. Since the 1979 Islamic revolution, Iran's regime articulated the grievances that many Arabs felt toward the United States and its support for dictators like Mubarak in their own countries.

 

Iran also stood with Syria as the bulwark against Israel's harsh treatment of Arabs, particularly Palestinians. Moreover, Mubarak often feared -- unjustifiably -- that Egypt's Islamists would embrace the Iranian model of a theocratic state.

 

Since the election of Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi, a leader in the Muslim Brotherhood, Iran has viewed the Islamist presidency as an opportunity, ignoring much of the criticism among Egypt's Islamists. But the reality is something different: instead of enhancing Muslim solidarity, the rise of Egypt's different strands of Islamism have served to confront Iran on political and theological grounds.(...)

 

More on: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/geneive-abdo/shiasunni-friction-growin_b_2859787.html

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Closer Iran-Egypt ties about tourism, not religion: Tourism ministry

Closer Iran-Egypt ties about tourism, not religion: Tourism ministry | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Egypt's tourism minister, Hisham Zaazou, has spoken about the ongoing rapprochement between Egypt and Iran, describing the deepening of relations between the two states as aimed at promoting tourism, and not political" or "religious. Al Ahramonline reported".

A recent visit by Iranian President Ahmadinejad to Cairo in February was considered by many observers to be a groundbreaking step in relations between Egypt, a majority Sunni nation, and the Shia state of Iran.

Promoting Iranian tourism in Egypt is not part of an Iranian "Shia-ization" scheme for the Middle East, and will not undermine Sunni values or dogmas, said Zaazou in an interview with Ahram's Arabic website.

(...) "We were keen to protect Egypt's national security and sovereignty during the negotiations, and all security risks were taken into consideration before signing the agreement," said Zaazou.(..)

The Fatimid area of Cairo holds religious sites and the graveyards of important Shia figures that could be a potential point of interest for Iranian tourists.

Ahmadinejad shed tears during a visit to the Sayyeda Zeinab Mosque in Old Cairo last month. Several Salafist groups held angry demonstrations, protesting the visit.

 

"Iran has normal relations and diplomatic missions with a lot of countries in the world except for the United States and Israel," said Zaazou, dismissing reports that rapprochement with Iran presents a security risk to Egypt.

Almost 10 million Iranian tourists visit Gulf countries and Europe each year, and Egypt should start benefiting from this significant flow of tourists, the minister of tourism said.

"Turkey alone receives almost 2 million Iranian tourists annually(...)

Ahmadinejad's visit to the Cairo was met by widespread discontent by some ultra-conservative groups that perceived the growing relations between the two countries as an "attack" on the Sunni sect.

The "Coalition of Muslims for the Defence of the Prophet's Companions and Family" has called for a million-man march on 15 March to protest what they called "normalisation with the Iranian entity."

In a press statement, the coalition demanded President Morsi re-freeze relations with Iran, as they could threaten Egypt's national sovereignty and spread the Shia sect in the predominantly

 

More on: http://en.trend.az/regions/met/arabicr/2126098.html

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