Égypt-actus
408.5K views | +11 today
Follow
Égypt-actus
Égypt-actus
revue de presse sur l'actualité culturelle, archéologique, politique et sociale de l'Égypte
Curated by Egypt-actus
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

Le ministère des Biens religieux impose le même prêche du vendredi dans toutes les mosquées d'Egypte

Le ministère des Biens religieux impose le même prêche du vendredi dans toutes les mosquées d'Egypte | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

The country’s mosques are the scene of one of the episodes of the conflict between the Ministry of Religious Endowments, which represents the state, and some clerics who represent the Muslim Brotherhood’s position of opposing “the coup and defending legitimacy.”

The Brotherhood’s tools inside the mosques do not differ from their tools outside: a harsh discourse that incites the masses against the current regime and that also calls on crowds to gather. Mosques sometimes act as outposts for Muslim Brotherhood snipers. Some have said that this is what happened to the Fatah Mosque when the Rabia al-Adawiya Square sit-in was broken up on Aug. 14, 2013.

The tools of the regime, on the other hand, are represented by the decision to enforce the laws, after they were amended to impose stiffer penalties. The authorities have dispatched clerics from the Ministry of Religious Endowments to the mosques that slipped from government control. Lately, the ministry has imposed harsh penalties for whoever deviates from its religious discourse.

As is usual in most conflicts between the two sides, human rights activists and those not affiliated with either side criticize both the Muslim Brotherhood and the authorities’ decisions.




more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

L'avenir de l'Islam politique : les leçons de la Turquie et de l'Egypte

L'avenir de l'Islam politique : les leçons de la Turquie et de l'Egypte | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it
Islamist parties can either hold on to their rigid ideological base trying to mold their societies to fit within their singular vision, or accept their role as an influential force in a democratic pluralistic regime, within which the rule of law must guarantee the protection of rights for everyone, including Islamists.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

Mursi says Egypt, Pakistan are pillars of Islamic world

Mursi says Egypt, Pakistan are pillars of Islamic world | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it
Egypt-actus's insight:

Egypt and Pakistan are pillars of the Islamic world that play a vital role for the Islamic nation and the region as a whole, Egyptian President Mohamed Mursi said on Monday.

Pakistan’s National University for Science and Technology awarded Mursi an honorary doctorate in philosophy during his visit to Islamabad. 

Mursi said that this visit is proof of the long historic ties between the two countries and marks a step in improving their ties.

"We are looking forward to making use of the opportunities available in different sectors in Pakistan," the Pakistani new agency reported Mursi as saying.

Egypt values the U.S. $500 million worth of investments which Pakistan gave to Egypt, the president added.

Pakistani President Asif Ali Zardari urged Mursi to take joint steps to support the Egyptian-Pakistani ties with a focus on trade and investment relations.

Pakistan's government and people value the relationship with their Egyptian brothers, a Pakistani news agency reported Zardari as saying.

 

This content is from :Aswat Masriya

 http://en.aswatmasriya.com/news/view.aspx?id=b55f9396-76ae-4a2e-a38a-dbfd65b7ef6b 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

Hookahs, hash and the Muslim Brotherhood

Hookahs, hash and the Muslim Brotherhood | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it
Um Salma’s tiny café is tucked in a maze of alleys in the Sayeda Aisha slum, home to the tomb of Aisha, the Prophet Mohamed’s youngest wife.

Pushing through the café’s saloon-style doors, a haze of acrid hash smoke assaults the senses. Inside, a dozen-odd workers sitting on wooden stools cluster around water pipes.

The water gurgles with each puff on the hookah’s long, slender hose. Traditional Egyptian music — the kind you can imagine a woman belly-dancing to, evoking the Sahara — rasps from an ageing cassette player.

 

Under the glare of neon bulbs, patrons banter about the slum’s latest news.

And they get utterly, convincingly high.

These men are a community, they say, but political discussions are "haram,"  or forbidden. Politics breeds divisions. Shared hits of Um Salma’s hash builds bonds.

 

Sixty-years-old, widowed and strictly religious in a gray-brown scarf draped over her hair and chest, Um Salma is an unlikely guardian of one of Egypt’s oldest pastimes. Although she enables an illegal activity, she is by no means an outcast here.

 

Her café “Dulab” — the Arabic word for a cabinet where prized possessions are kept from prying eyes — is one of this ancient city’s many sanctuaries for hash-smokers.

 

Despite Egypt’s conservative Muslim government and its harsh drug penalties, Um Salma’s guests don’t fear law enforcement as they smoke the sticky brown resin, or its sister schwag known here as “bango.”  They say they have an understanding with local police, who rarely bother them.

 

From the 19th-century laborers who shocked Napoleon with their unabashed love for the intoxicant, to contemporary elite professionals — including, it is rumored, former Egyptian President Anwar Sadat — Egypt is perennially up in smoke. (...)

 

Egypt traces its hash habit to roughly the 12th century, according to a Columbia University report. Back then, Muslim Sufi mystics smoked the drug to reach spiritual ecstasy.

 

Today, it is more popular among the vast working poor like those at Um Salma’s, who inhale pipes and joints to unwind amid the crescendo of political and economic turmoil.(...) Drug prevention workers and rehabilitation therapists in the capital say there are likely 10 million, but perhaps as many as 15 million, casual users.

 

There’s a deep irony to Egypt’s widespread drug use. Using hash or other drugs is a serious criminal offense here. Trafficking illicit substances is punishable by death, while possession of small quantities can draw life sentences, for addicts and infrequent users alike.

 

Egypt is one of 32 countries that have laws mandating the death penalty for some drug offenses, though it ranks below places like Iran, China and Saudi Arabia for the number of offenders executed. (...)

 

According to Amnesty International, over the last decade Egypt saw a marked decrease in the number of criminal executions. Because Egypt’s prisons are run by the highly secretive interior ministry, there are no statistics available. (...)

 

Egypt-actus's insight:

Drug prevention workers say lax law enforcement since Egypt’s uprising two years ago has contributed to an increase in drug use and general flouting of the nation’s substance laws. Citizens smoke openly in the streets. (...)

The authorities themselves are rumored to be involved in the trade. (...)

 

Even with Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood controlling the presidency, a long-standing belief that Islam doesn’t explicitly forbid hash is warding off appeals by more conservative Islamists to crackdown on the habit.(...) . The Muslim holy book, does in fact include prohibitions on alcohol use — but does not mention hash as either forbidden or tolerated. (...)

 

And while Islamists may oppose its use, hash-smoking and addiction should not be criminalized, some Brotherhood leaders say. They think rehabilitation is the way to treat what they see as a deepening social problem.

 

More on: http://www.globalpost.com/dispatch/news/regions/middle-east/egypt/130221/hookahs-hash-muslim-brotherhood-Egypt-political-risk-conflict-zones

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

Campaigners call for counseling sessions for converts to Islam

Campaigners call for counseling sessions for converts to Islam | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

In recent years, Egypt has witnessed an increase in cases of disappearance among Coptic girls. According to the Association of Victims of Abduction and Enforced Disappearances (AVAED), 500 cases were reported in 2012 and 10 already in January 2013.

 

 

In many cases, members of the Salafist movement declare that the disappeared girl has converted to Islam and married a Muslim man. Her family would be asked to stop searching for her despite that in many cases the girl would be underage and should enjoy protected rights under Egyptian law and the international Convention on the Rights of the Child.

In the case of the disappearance of Sara Abdel-Malik, who came to be known as the ''Dabaa girl," a 13-year-old girl was reportedly kidnapped in Matrouh last September. Several Salafists said Abdel-Malek was not kidnapped but that she made a decision to convert to Islam and marry. While her family considered her abducted, especially as she is underage, several Salafists argued she was mature enough to make life decisions and refused that she be returned to her family.

Such cases have Coptic activists worried about the state and future of religious freedoms in Egypt, especially after Sharia (Islamic law) has moved to the centre of public debate and taken a more prominent positition in Egypt's constitution. (Ahram Online)

 

More : http://english.ahram.org.eg/NewsContent/1/64/65094/Egypt/Politics-/Campaigners-call-for-counseling-sessions-for-conve.aspx

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

Holier than thou: extremism against Islam

Holier than thou: extremism against Islam | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Statements from three popular Egyptian religious preachers have left the Egyptian public in an uproar.

One of the statements justifies sexually assaulting female protesters, another calls for murdering leaders of parties in opposition to President Mursi, yet another calls on the president to crack down heavily on protestors – before private citizens take matters into their hands. The irony of this situation is that from a religious perspective, the uproar against these statements is far more justifiable than the statements themselves.

Ahmed Mohammed Abdullah justified the sexual assault of female protestors with a detailed “analysis,” including demographics: “they are going there to get raped”; 90% of them are Christian, and the rest are widows without husbands to keep them in line. How he knew any of this is unclear – but even if it were all true, how any of it would be justification for sexual assault is even more unclear. Moreover, he ridiculed statements from the opposition that attacking women is a “red line” that must not be crossed.

Rape is ‘forbidden’ in Islam

The insensitivity and inappropriateness of Abdullah’s statements aside, given Egypt’s increasingly difficult sexual harassment problem, they are also in direct contradiction to Islamic law , which considers rape, assault and sexual harassment as forbidden, sinful and criminal, with the harasser responsible for the harassment. Considering that these are basic tenets of Islamic law, one wonders how he might be brought to account by the law for essentially perverting the perception of Islam in the public arena. (...)

A more peaceful view

In contrast, Grand Mufti Ali Gomaa has said that peaceful demonstrations are a right in Islam, though they should avoid harming people, property, and national interests. While some protests have resulted in violence, much of this violence was due in part by the heavy-handed response of the police – and in any case, the opposition leadership’s ability to command the protest movement is tenuous at best, and non-existent at worst. Even if the protestors were guilty of crimes, it is down to the state authorities responsible for maintaining law and order that have the authority to consider issuing legal verdicts – not private muftis (even if they are qualified), let alone unqualified TV personalities. (...)

 

More on: http://english.alarabiya.net/views/2013/02/12/265851.html

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

Jeannette Bougrab : "L'islamisme modéré c'est comme la lapidation avec des petits cailloux"

L'INVITE" de TV5MONDE présenté par Patrick SIMONIN le 07.02.13: La fille de Harki devenue présidente de la Haute autorité contre les discriminations, puisministre témoigne face à l'actualité : les émeutes en Tunisie, la montée de l'islamisme....

 

Lien proposé par Françoise Autier.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

Lectures et usages féministes de l’islam

Lectures et usages féministes de l’islam | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Cet ouvrage, qui constitue à certains égards un manifeste, bat en brèche l’idée selon laquelle féminisme et islam seraient incompatibles. Onze auteures, qui se réclament pour la plupart du féminisme islamique et dont certaines sont des figures de proue de ce mouvement intellectuel, expliquent comment le Coran peut être la source de revendications visant à remettre en question l’ordre patriarcal, et ce, dans différents contextes (France, Malaisie, Égypte, Iran, Syrie). Au regard des publications académiques existant sur ce sujet en langue française [1], le but ici est clairement d’initier un large public à cette démarche. Les auteures écrivent pour une partie d’entre elles à la fois en tant que participantes au mouvement et en tant qu’universitaires en sciences humaines et sociales.


Paris, La Fabrique, 2012. 234 p

Egypt-actus's insight:

Zahra Ali, militante et sociologue qui a coordonné l’ouvrage, synthétise, dans une introduction utile et pédagogique, les trois « domaines » dans lesquels les féministes islamiques travaillent : premièrement, elles révisent la jurisprudence islamique (fiqh) et l’exégèse coranique (tafsir) afin de réfuter les lectures « masculines et sexistes » des textes (p. 24). Deuxièmement, elles mettent en lumière le rôle des femmes dans l’histoire de l’islam et des sociétés musulmanes et cherchent à constituer un savoir par les femmes sur les femmes. L’une des contributrices, Asma Lamrabet, médecin marocaine exerçant à Rabat et auteure de plusieurs ouvrages relevant du féminisme islamique, insiste à cet égard sur le double apport de cette relecture historique permettant de contrer tant les interprétations « patriarcales » que l’image monolithique et anhistorique de l’islam circulant dans les « sociétés occidentales ». Troisièmement, les féministes islamiques élaborent une pensée féministe autour des « principes fondamentaux de justice et d’égalité » participant d’une réforme de la pensée musulmane orthodoxe.


Plus : http://www.laviedesidees.fr/Lectures-et-usages-feministes-de-l.html?lang=fr

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

Grand mufti approves death penalty for 'Innocence of Muslims' producers

Grand mufti approves death penalty for 'Innocence of Muslims' producers | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it
Egypt's Grand Mufti Ali Gomaa has approved a death sentence delivered in absentia for seven Coptic Egyptian expats accused of producing and acting a movie deemed insulting to Islam.
Egypt-actus's insight:

The declaration was made Tuesday by a judge at the Cairo Criminal Court.

Egypt's State Security Court had sentenced the defendants in November to death and referred the verdict to the mufti for approval. (...)

Five of the defendants live in the United States, one in Australia and another in Canada.

Prosecutors accused them of provoking sectarianism, blasphemy and endangering national unity and social peace. They had also been accused of posting an Internet invitation to divide Egypt into several states along ethnic and religious lines

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

Selon l’Evêque titulaire d’Andropoli, l’Egypte ne peut devenir islamiste comme le Mali

Selon l’Evêque titulaire d’Andropoli, l’Egypte ne peut devenir islamiste comme le Mali | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it
Egypt-actus's insight:

(Agence Fides) – « L’avenir de l’Egypte ? En ce moment, personne ne le connaît, pas même le Président Mursi ». Deux ans après la révolution du 25 janvier 2011, alors que de nouveaux affrontements de rue ont lieu entre la police et les manifestants anti-gouvernementaux, l’Evêque de Curie d’Alexandrie des Coptes catholiques, S. Exc. Mgr Youhanna Golta, dessine pour l’Agence Fides les contours du moment délicat que vit le grand pays africain. Selon l’Evêque, « si le gouvernement et les Frères musulmans tentent de réprimer les manifestations de protestation organisées ces jours-ci, l’Egypte connaîtra à nouveau le cauchemar de la guerre civile ». En qualité de représentant des Eglises catholiques présentes en Egypte, l’Evêque a participé à l’Assemblée constituante appelée à rédiger la nouvelle Charte constitutionnelle. Il confirme aujourd’hui à Fides les raisons qui l’ont porté, comme les autres représentants chrétiens, à se retirer de cet organisme : « Les travaux avaient bien commencé mais à un certain moment, il est devenu évident que les Frères musulmans et les salafistes voulaient imposer une Constitution islamiste. Nous avons discuté avec leurs responsables mais ils n’ont rien voulu savoir. Nous avons compris que notre fonction était seulement décorative et nous sommes partis ». Ces derniers jours, les représentants chrétiens se sont également retirés officiellement de ce qu’il est convenu d’appeler « dialogue national », convoqué par le Président Mursi afin de tenter de renouer les contacts avec les partenaires sociaux et les groupes d’opposition. « Pour dialoguer – remarque Mgr Golta – il faut que quelqu’un sache écouter ce que dit l’autre. Le Parti « Egypte forte » fondé par l’ancien responsable des Frères musulmans Abdel Moneim Abul Fotouh, a lui aussi quitté le dialogue national. Et nous demeurons également en contact avec les représentants de l’Université Al-Azhar. Seule une minorité du peuple a appuyé par son vote au référendum l’entrée en vigueur de la nouvelle Constitution ». Selon l’Evêque, un match géopolitique décisif pour le Moyen-Orient et au-delà se joue actuellement en Egypte. « L’Egypte n’est pas le Mali. Il se trouve à la croisée de l’Europe, de l’Asie et de l’Afrique. Plus de dix millions de chrétiens y vivent. Son économie se base sur le tourisme et le commerce. C’est pourquoi, il n’est pas possible d’accepter de devenir un pays islamiste. Mais il existe des stratégies internationales qui conçoivent également une division de l’Egypte. Et ce serait le peuple qui en ferait les frais. Personnellement – poursuit Mgr Gopta – j’aime mes frères et sœurs musulmans. J’ai dédié également mes études et mon doctorat à la culture islamique. Mais pour nous tous, le pari ouvert est si l’on va vers un pays fanatique ou vers un pays civil ». Pour l’Evêque, le problème de fonds est celui du rapport entre la politique et la religion. « Ceux qui veulent être religieux ne peuvent prétendre obliger ex legge les gens à prier, à ne pas boire d’alcool ou à suivre toutes les pratiques liées à leur religion. Dans les pays arabes, seule la séparation de la religion et de la politique pourra permettre l’avènement de la démocratie ». (GV) (Agence Fides 25/01/2013)

---------------------

 

Portrait de Monseigneur Youhanna Golta : http://hebdo.ahram.org.eg/arab/ahram/2010/2/24/visa0.htm

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

Egypte: le choc des civilisations, par Alexandre Buccianti

Egypte: le choc des civilisations, par Alexandre Buccianti | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Deux ans après la révolution qui a renversé celui qui était surnommé «le dernier Pharaon», l’Egypte est le théâtre d’un grand choc des civilisations : la culture de la vallée fertile du Nil face aux us et coutumes des dunes du désert arabique. Le choc dépasse, en effet, la dimension politique – islamistes et anti-islamistes – pour atteindre ce qui constitue l’essence même de la civilisation égyptienne, sa culture.


Egypt-actus's insight:

Extraits

 

Ceux qui vont descendre ce vendredi 25 janvier place Tahrir et ailleurs en Egypte ne cherchent pas tant à arracher le pouvoir aux Frères (Ikhwan) musulmans qu’à les empêcher de « ikhwaniser » la vallée du Nil.

Et ce n’est pas le voile islamique ou la dévotion religieuse qui sont en jeu. La majorité des opposantes aux Ikhwan sont voilées et la plupart des opposants sont musulmans pratiquants. Mais il s’agit d’un autre islam. Un islam ouvert et tolérant, reflétant la culture millénaire de l’Egypte face à l’islam wahhabite et taliban.

La vraie bataille est donc d’ordre culturel : d’un côté, les modernistes et les « libres penseurs », de l’autre les fondamentalistes et les adeptes de la « pensée unique ». Les premiers ont déclenché la révolution mais les seconds en ont profité. Ils ont remporté les élections législatives et présidentielles sans oublier le référendum contesté sur la Constitution. Avec leurs alliés salafistes, les Ikhwan estiment que leur heure est arrivée. (...)

Le président Morsi a bien tenté l’approche « dialogue » qu’il affectionne en se réunissant en septembre avec des artistes au risque de se faire critiquer par des cheikhs salafistes. Comme avec les hommes politiques de l’opposition, le raïs les a entendus mais n’a tenu aucun compte de leurs revendications.

Dès qu’ils en ont l’occasion, les islamistes et le gouvernement effacent les graffitis, cette invention remontant aux Pharaons, pour parfois les remplacer par des versets du Coran. Les cheikhs de nombreuses mosquées vouent les artistes aux gémonies dans leur prêche du vendredi. Les artistes et les journalistes sont poursuivis en justice par des avocats Ikhwan quand ce n’est pas par la présidence elle-même.

Pour l’instant, seuls des blogueurs relativement inconnus ont été condamnés à des peines de prison. Mais l’épée de Damoclès reste suspendue sur la tête de tous les partisans de la liberté d’expression et de création. Une épée qui pourrait commencer à décapiter si les islamistes remportent les élections législatives prévues dans deux mois. Rien n’empêchera alors un Parlement dominé par les islamistes et doté d’une Constitution sur mesure, de forger un arsenal législatif répressif. Pour les artistes et autres créateurs, c’est une raison de plus pour descendre dans la rue et manifester contre les islamistes le 25 janvier.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

Egypt's al-Azhar University Issues Book Teaching Kids the Killing of Sinners

This video footage is taken from a televised show on Al-Tahrir TV channel (Egypt) showing a guest quoting passages from a book - titled 'al-Iqnaa' (The Persuasion) - issued by al-Azhar University (one of the world's oldest universities & the most prestigious Islamic school) being taught to Egyptian high-school students that calls for the killing of sinners - such as apostates, those who don't pray, adulterers, and those who have a punishment set for them - as well as their eating.

The talk show host was very surprised and warned that this could be fertile ground for religious zealots who form Saudi-like committees for the Promotion of Virtue and Prevention of Vice to carry out such acts on Egyptian citizens.

As the Muslim Brotherhood became increasingly powerful in Egypt, such insane Wahhabi writings have made their way even into the most prestigious religious institutions in that country.

Source: Al Tahrir TV (Egypt)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

Islam politique: A l’épreuve des faits, par Chaïmaa Abdel-Hamid

Islam politique: A l’épreuve des faits, par Chaïmaa Abdel-Hamid | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

 Deux ans après les révolutions du Printemps arabe, la colère populaire ne s’est pas éteinte. Après s’être emparés du pouvoir, les islamistes ont certes commis de nombreuses erreurs, mais pour certains observateurs, la barre peut encore être redressée.

Egypt-actus's insight:

Extrait

 

En Egypte, des grèves ont été organisées, des journaux ont cessé de paraître, et la crainte d’une insurrection généralisée reste vive. Des centaines de personnes ont été blessées au cours d’affrontements dans les rues du Caire devant le palais présidentiel. Le politologue Yousri Al-Azabawy, du Centre des Etudes Politiques et Stratégiques d’Al-Ahram (CEPS), explique qu’en Egypte, on parle de plusieurs islam politiques, ayant plus d’un noyau. En plus des Frères musulmans au pouvoir, on retrouve aussi le courant très important des salafistes qui ont fait eux aussi leur entrée dans la vie politique après la révolution.

La question qui s’impose est de savoir si cet islam politique, dans sa forme actuelle, peut répondre positivement à l’attente de démocratie. Le politologue explique que tous les critères du changement démocratique utilisés jusque-là par les islamistes ne peuvent faire avancer les choses : « A commencer par leurs discours, les islamistes utilisent un ton fort et violent. C’est la pire des périodes du discours islamique. Celui-ci porte sur ce qu’on appelle l’identité imaginée, c’est-à-dire que leur vision ne se limite pas à eux-mêmes mais à l’image de l’Etat. Outre le discours, ils sont aussi poussés par leur rêve de restaurer le califat islamique. Ils veulent islamiser les connaissances, c’est-à-dire donner un caractère islamique à la littérature, à l’art et aux sciences ».Et d’ajouter : « le plus grave, c’est qu’ils ont prouvé qu’ils ne croient pas à la démocratie mais à l’idée d’al-choura », cette dernière étant une conception plus islamique de la démocratie, jugée trop occidentale. (...)

Pour la grande majorité des islamistes aussi, on est bien loin de parler d’un échec. Il s’agit dans le fond d’un complot des « felouls » (éléments de l’ancien régime) et de certains membres de l’opposition qui veulent profiter de l’occasion pour faire chuter les islamistes. Pour Hani Salaheddine, dirigeant médiatique au sein de la confrérie, « le président Morsi a insisté et plusieurs fois invité l’opposition à un dialogue mais c’est toujours elle qui refuse le rapprochement ». Il poursuit : « Cette opposition est faible et a échoué à convaincre la rue de ses projets, et donc elle a commencé à agiter l’épouvantail économique pour prouver l’échec du président Morsi ». Un avis partagé par Tareq Al-Zomor, président du bureau politique au parti islamiste Al-Benaa wa Al-Tanmiya, qui a expliqué que « cette opposition ne vise dans le fond qu’à faire chuter le régime, mais elle est bien faible pour le faire ». Reste que Mohamad Morsi doit mener de sérieuses réformes économiques pour redresser la barre. Baisse de la croissance, des investissements étrangers, des revenus du tourisme, hausse du chômage et du déficit budgétaire, dépréciation de la livre égyptienne… Un défi lourd à lever, alors que le gouvernement vient d’être remanié touchant des portefeuilles importants comme le ministère de l’Intérieur ou celui des Finances. Il faut donc attendre... Mais ce qui est certain, c’est qu’il n’existe pas d’alternative à cette force politique. Alors, il serait important de reconnaître que si les islamistes ont réussi à s’emparer du pouvoir après les révolutions arabes, cela n’est qu’un reflet de l’échec de tous les autres projets. (Al-Ahram Hebdo)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

"Sharia and the Making of the Modern Egyptian", by Reem A. Meshal

"Sharia and the Making of the Modern Egyptian", by Reem A. Meshal | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

The American University in Cairo Press, 2014, 304 pages

 

The origins of citizenship and individual rights in the Sharia courts of sixteenth-century Cairo 

In this new study, the author examines sijills, the official documents of the Ottoman Islamic courts, to understand how sharia law, society, and the early-modern economy of sixteenth- and seventeenth-century Ottoman Cairo related to the practice of custom in determining rulings. In the sixteenth century, a new legal and cultural orthodoxy fostered the development of an early-modern Islam that broke new ground, giving rise to a new concept of the citizen and his role. Contrary to the prevailing scholarly view, this work adopts the position that local custom began to diminish and decline as a source of authority. These issues resonate today, several centuries later, in the continuing discussions of individual rights in relation to Islamic law.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

La référence islamique, une constante dans les pays arabes

Les constitutions – notamment celle qui vient d'être approuvée en Égypte, et celle qui est encore en discussion en Tunisie –, sont scrutées en raison de la montée des revendications identitaires au sein des sociétés elles-mêmes. La question qui s'y pose est la suivante : comment concilier aspirations démocratiques – et donc respect des libertés – et identité musulmane ou arabo-musulmane ? « La Tunisie a réussi dans une certaine mesure l'articulation entre l'identité islamique (de l'État et du peuple) et la modernité. Le problème aujourd'hui, c'est justement la remise en cause de ce processus de modernisation et de ses acquis, et de l'identité nationale fondée entre autres sur l'islam », avance Asma Nouira, professeur de sciences politiques à l'université Al Manar de Tunis.

En Égypte, comme en Tunisie, les défenseurs des libertés redoutent que la balance ne penche dorénavant un peu plus en faveur de « l'identité ». En Égypte, l'islam conserve indéniablement une place importante dans le nouveau texte, pourtant censé « désislamiser » celui des Frères musulmans : l'article 2 continue à proclamer que l'islam est la religion de l'État et que les principes de la charia islamique sont la source principale de la législation. Seul a disparu l'article 219 qui donnait une définition quelque peu extensive des principes de la charia. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

Élection du pape François : le monde musulman espère renouer le dialogue avec l'Église

Élection du pape François : le monde musulman espère renouer le dialogue avec l'Église | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Le monde musulman a espéré jeudi avoir de meilleures relations avec le Vatican sous le nouveau pape François, après des années de rapports difficiles avec Benoît XVI, critiqué pour des positions jugées hostiles à l'islam. L'Organisation de la coopération islamique (OCI), qui regroupe 57 pays, de même que l'institution d'al-Azhar au Caire, le plus important centre théologique sunnite, ont exprimé des voeux en ce sens.

 

"Nous espérons de meilleures relations avec le Vatican après l'élection du nouveau pape, pour le bien de l'humanité tout entière", a déclaré Mahmoud Azab, conseiller pour le dialogue interreligieux du grand imam d'al-Azhar, Ahmad al-Tayyeb. Mahmoud Azab a toutefois laissé entendre que le nouveau chef de l'Église catholique serait jugé sur pièces. "Dès qu'apparaîtra une nouvelle orientation, nous reviendrons au dialogue avec le Vatican qui avait été suspendu début 2011", a-t-il souligné.

 

Le pape Benoît XVI avait entretenu des relations difficiles avec les musulmans(...) Le dialogue avec al-Azhar avait repris en 2009, avant d'être de nouveau rompu après un appel du pape à protéger les minorités chrétiennes, après un attentat-suicide contre une église d'Alexandrie en Égypte dans la nuit du 31 décembre 2010 au 1er janvier 2011. Al-Azhar avait vu dans ces déclarations sur les chrétiens d'Orient des "attaques répétées contre l'islam".

Inquiétudes

"Un rétablissement de bonnes relations entre le monde musulman et le Vatican dépend de la personnalité du nouveau pape, de sa pensée et de sa vision pour le rapprochement entre les religions et les peuples", estime Ali Bakr, spécialiste des mouvements islamistes du centre d'études stratégiques d'al-Ahram au Caire. À la suite des soulèvements arabes de 2011, les islamistes sont devenus la première force politique dans plusieurs pays de la région, aggravant le sentiment d'insécurité des minorités chrétiennes. C'est notamment le cas en Égypte, pays le plus peuplé du monde arabe avec plus de 80 millions d'habitants, où un membre des Frères musulmans, Mohamed Morsi, a été élu à la présidence en juin 2012. L'Égypte compte la plus vaste communauté chrétienne du Moyen-Orient, les Coptes, dans leur immense majorité des orthodoxes mais dont une petite partie est liée à l'Église de Rome.

 

Les craintes des chrétiens d'Orient sont particulièrement vives face à la progression des salafistes, tenants d'un islam rigoriste et d'une application stricte de la charia (la loi islamique). Chaabane Abdel Alim, un dirigeant du principal parti égyptien de cette obédience, al-Nour, a toutefois assuré, au lendemain de l'élection du pape François :

"En tant que salafistes, nous ne sommes pas contre le dialogue (avec le Vatican), au contraire nous l'accueillons favorablement."

 

Georges Fahmi, un chercheur de confession copte du centre al-Badaël (les alternatives) d'études politiques au Caire, affirme quant à lui que le nouveau pape devrait "faire prévaloir les valeurs communes de l'islam et du christianisme" pour favoriser "un retour au dialogue".

 

http://www.lepoint.fr/monde/election-du-pape-francois-le-monde-musulman-espere-renouer-le-dialogue-avec-l-eglise-14-03-2013-1639994_24.php

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

Political Islam in Name Only -Asharq Alawsat Newspaper

Political Islam in Name Only -Asharq Alawsat Newspaper | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Several politicians and analysts are trying to look closely and accurately into the state of confusion, tension, and failure that has characterized the experience of the ruling political groups and parties in Tunisia, Egypt, and Libya, ever since the outbreak of the Arab Spring revolutions. 

(...) these political groups (...) have failed to accommodate different segments of society and represent them all, particularly at a highly sensitive time following on from the violent and impassioned uprisings.

These groups were once part of the opposition category themselves; practicing their activities in secret under the severe oppression of the previous regimes. As a result, once in power they took on a retaliatory form, further intensifying the state of fragmentation and fuelling mistrust within society.

 

Islam’s discourse on politics in general is somewhat shallow. While we can find dozens of volumes and books on purity, worship, and other issues, there are very few books on "political fiqh", and a clear lack of scholarly consensus.

 

This means that we must use much discretion when talking about political Islam; no one alone can claim a full understanding, and no one should be able to impose this understanding upon others.(...)

 

When one chooses to represent religion in the political domain, he must entail a greater moral responsibility because a huge amount of harm can be caused by his failure. Numerous examples of this can be seen in Tunisia, Egypt, and Libya, with a prevailing atmosphere of disappointment and frustration. (...)

 

The same applies to what is happening now in Egypt under President Mursi's government, with Prime Minister Hisham Qandil. A large section of the Egyptian people unanimously believe that Qandil has failed to manage the country's affairs, and also that the position of prime minister requires someone of greater expertise. Furthermore, they believe his incompetent handling of the economic situation could prove the biggest danger of all.

 

Nevertheless, the man continues to cling to his position out of "stubbornness and arrogance", ignoring the demands of many Egyptians and describing them as a mob or corrupt remnants. In reality, this behavior is reminiscent of the style adopted by the very regimes the Arab Spring revolutions rose against in the first place.

 

Egypt-actus's insight:

Prophet Mohammed’s approach is a far cry from those who currently claim to be following in his footsteps in the name of political Islam. Mohammed did not advocate revenge, slander or suspicion, nor did he label others as traitors (...)

 

Yet modern-day political Islam continues to generate social ills such as division and sedition, and this situation is exacerbated by specific groups claiming the exclusive right to speak, understand, and judge in the name of religion. The cost of this will not be paid by the current governments or regimes; it is the generations to come who will truly suffer.

 

More: http://www.asharq-e.com/news.asp?section=2&id=32999

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

"Changer l'islam - Dictionnaire des réformateurs musulmans des origines à nos jours", par Chebel Malek

"Changer l'islam - Dictionnaire des réformateurs musulmans des origines à nos jours", par Chebel Malek | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it
Egypt-actus's insight:
Format KindleTaille du fichier : 508 KBNombre de pages de l'édition imprimée : 288 pagesEditeur : Editions Albin Michel (1 février 2013)

On parle sans cesse de « réformer l’islam », comme si l’islam avait toujours été figé. Cette vision des choses arrange autant les pourfendeurs d’un islam « rétrograde » que les fondamentalistes d’un islam « éternel ». Mais le fait est que l’islam n’a jamais cessé de se réinventer et de se remettre en question à travers la voix de penseurs, de théologiens et de mystiques qui se sont heurtés à l’establishment clérical et politique. Avec ce dictionnaire, Malek Chebel nous présente les grandes figures de l’histoire de la réforme en islam, dont la diversité est souvent surprenante : en effet, le monde islamique a connu des réformes libérales et modernistes, aussi bien doctrinales que philosophiques, mais aussi des retours obsédants vers un « islam des origines », pur et anhistorique. On rencontrera donc aussi bien des universitaires progressistes comme Mohammed Arkoun que les fondateurs d’idéologies contemporaines telles que l’islamisme, le wahhabisme et le salafisme, qui sont toutes les produits d’une confrontation à la modernité et à la mondialisation. L’ouvrage ne se limite pas au monde arabe mais inclut également l’Inde, la Turquie, l’Indonésie, l’Asie centrale, l’Iran, le Pakistan et jusqu’à l’Amérique.Tout en prenant sans ambiguïté parti pour une réforme libérale, Malek Chebel nous donne à saisir toute la complexité des multiples courants de pensée qui ont agité l’islam, tant sur le plan politique que religieux. Un livre de notre temps.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

Les clefs de la révolution arabe

Les clefs de la révolution arabe | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Au-delà de la logique révolutionnaire, il y a la complexité de la démocratie elle même. Aujourd'hui dans le monde, la division de leurs opinions publiques rend les régimes démocratiques de moins en moins gouvernables. L'existence de désaccords sur les fondamentaux s'exprime sur des questions centrales, qu'elles soient de société comme le droit au mariage pour tous, ou sur la place et le rôle de l'Etat dans la gestion de l'économie. Mais l'existence d'une culture démocratique rend ces divisions plus ou moins gérables. Le respect de la personne et des idées de l'autre est la base même de la démocratie. Et il existe des institutions capables d'imposer un principe d'ordre qui s'impose à tous. Aux Etats-Unis, par exemple, personne ne conteste les décisions de la Cour suprême. Mais « l'esprit des lois » est une conquête tardive et fragile. En Tunisie et en Egypte, le respect de la différence chez l'autre existe d'autant moins qu'il n'existe pas de culture démocratique ni d'équilibre institutionnel. Seule l'armée, en Egypte, peut apparaître comme garante de l'impartialité de l'Etat. L'armée n'a pas cette centralité et cette force dans la société tunisienne.

A cette absence de culture et d'institutions démocratiques s'ajoute une dimension de nature culturelle et idéologique liée à l'islam lui-même. Les partis religieux sont portés par une foi qui ne distingue pas entre ce qui appartient à Dieu et ce qui appartient à César. Dire qu'il y a une incompatibilité entre islam et démocratie est une simplification abusive de la réalité. L'expérience de la Turquie ou celle de l'Indonésie constituent un démenti à cette affirmation. Mais, à l'inverse, nier qu'il puisse exister un problème d'ajustement entre islam politique et progrès démocratique serait se voiler pudiquement la face. Il n'existe pas à la tête de l'islam l'équivalent d'un pape, une autorité de référence qui puisse s'élever contre les dérives autoritaires et fondamentalistes. De même qu'hier ,au lendemain des attentats du 11 septembre 2001, il n'y a pas eu de grandes manifestations des musulmans pour condamner les actes terroristes, les Frères musulmans en Egypte ou le parti Ennahda en Tunisie ne s'élèvent pas avec force et clarté aujourd'hui contre les dérives extrémistes en leur sein. Un silence retentissant qui sonne comme une forme, sinon de soutien, tout du moins de compréhension. (Dominique MoÏsi/Les Echos)

 

Plus : http://www.lesechos.fr/economie-politique/monde/debat/0202557755425-les-clefs-de-la-revolution-arabe-537096.php

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

Iran's Ahmadinejad kissed and scolded in Egypt

Iran's Ahmadinejad kissed and scolded in Egypt | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it
Egypt-actus's insight:

"Mahmoud Ahmadinejad was both kissed and scolded on Tuesday when he began the first visit to Egypt by an Iranian president since Tehran's 1979 Islamic revolution.

The trip was meant to underline a thaw in relations since Egyptians elected an Islamist head of state, President Mohamed Mursi, last June. But it also highlighted deep theological and geopolitical differences.

Mursi, a member of the Sunni Muslim Brotherhood, kissed Ahmadinejad after he landed at Cairo airport and gave him a red carpet reception with military honours. Ahmadinejad beamed as he shook hands with waiting dignitaries.

But the Shi'ite Iranian leader received a stiff rebuke when he met Egypt's leading Sunni Muslim scholar later at Cairo's historic al-Azhar mosque and university."

(Reuters, via Aswat Masriya)


More : http://en.aswatmasriya.com/news/view.aspx?id=90819505-0d6b-4825-ac38-75832f8ae70c

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

Egypte: Morsi rattrapée par l’exaspération populaire (analyse)

Egypte: Morsi rattrapée par l’exaspération populaire (analyse) | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Des milliers de personnes défilaient ce vendredi au Caire, sous la pluie, pour protester contre le président islamiste Mohamed Morsi, accusé de trahir les idéaux de la révolution qui lui a permis d'accéder au pouvoir. Pour Hassane Zerouki, journaliste à la rubrique internationale de l'Humanité, "les Égyptiens attendent autre chose que l’aumône" de la part des Frères musulmans désormais au pouvoir.

Egypt-actus's insight:

L’Égypte est-elle au bord du chaos? Certainement pas. Mais le vent de colère qui souffle sur le pays des pharaons est un signe qui ne trompe pas dans la mesure où il est l’expression d’un désaveu populaire envers le président Morsi et le Parti de la justice et de la liberté (PJL), l’aile politique de la confrérie des Frères musulmans. Instrumentalisant jusqu’à l’absurde l’islam à des fins politiques, promettant, sous le slogan « l’islam est la solution », l’amélioration des conditions sociales d’existence du plus grand nombre, les islamistes sont en train de faire la démonstration que l’on ne peut gouverner un pays de 80 millions d’habitants à coups de slogans politico-religieux.

Six mois après l’élection de Mohamed Morsi, les Égyptiens n’ont constaté aucun changement. Pire, la situation économique et financière s’est dégradée. Quant à l’économie islamique, cette « troisième voie entre le capitalisme et le socialisme » prônée par les Frères musulmans, elle s’est avérée un slogan creux. En réalité, l’économie islamique n’est rien d’autre qu’une somme de recettes éculées du néolibéralisme qui a démontré ailleurs son incapacité à sortir des pays du cercle du sous-développement.

Malgré l’argent du Qatar – deux milliards de dollars octroyés – dont elle dépend de plus en plus, l’Égypte de Morsi a dû faire appel au FMI, lequel conditionne son aide de 4,8 milliards de dollars à l’acceptation de sévères mesures d’austérité budgétaire. Mieux, non seulement Mohamed Morsi a déclaré qu’il s’y conformerait mais il a assuré, selon le Monde diplomatique du mois de février, devant une délégation d’hommes d’affaires américains, « qu’il ne reculerait pas devant des réformes structurelles draconiennes afin de redresser l’économie ». Et pour y parvenir, il est prêt à remettre en cause les libertés et des acquis syndicaux obtenus au lendemain de la chute du président Moubarak. (L'Humanité)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

Egypt court sentences 7 to death for anti-Islam film

Egypt court sentences 7 to death for anti-Islam film | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it
Egypt-actus's insight:

A Cairo criminal court has sentenced seven people to death for an offensive film following the approval of the Mufti (Sunni Islamic scholar). 

The film, which insults Islamic Prophet Mohamed, prompted violent clashes across the region last year.

The defendants are: Morris Sadek Gerges Abdel Shahid (lawyer from the National Coptic Association), Morcos Aziz Khalil (television presenter of a religious program), Fekry Abdel Maseeh Zaqlama (doctor), Nabil Adeeb Beseda Moussa (member of the National American Association), Nicola Bassili Nicola (studied at Cairo University), Nahed Mahmoud Metwaly (doctor who lives in Australia) and Nader Farid Nicola.

The court also sentenced Terry Jones, American pastor of Dove World Outreach Center, to five years in jail for contempt of religion. 

Egypt's former Attorney General had referred the defendants to court on charges of contempt of religion, insulting Prophet Mohamed, inciting violence and sectarian strife and plotting against Egypt. 

 

This content is from :Aswat Masriya  
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

EgyptAir reviews in-flight movies after Islamist complaint -

EgyptAir reviews in-flight movies after Islamist complaint - | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it
Egypt-actus's insight:

(Reuters) - Egypt's national airline said on Thursday it will analyse its onboard movies to make sure they respect "Egyptian values and customs", following a complaint by a Muslim Brotherhood member who took offence at a film screened during one of its flights.

EgyptAir said the film had been turned off at the request of Ahmed Fahmy, the speaker of Egypt's upper house of parliament and a leading member of the Muslim Brotherhood's Freedom and Justice Party. In a statement, EgyptAir said he had "expressed reservations about one of the scenes" in the movie.

The statement did not name the film, but local media identified it as "Arees Mama", or "Mother's Suitor", a decades-old movie starring the Egyptian actress Nelly. Al-Masry Al-Youm, a newspaper, said Fahmy had taken offence at scenes of intimacy.

Fahmy could not immediately be reached for comment.

The case is likely to fuel concerns about the extent to which the Muslim Brotherhood, which propelled President Mohamed Mursi to power in an election last year, could use its new position of power to curb freedom of expression.

 

More : http://en.aswatmasriya.com/news/view.aspx?id=28029c00-d152-448a-9dee-f147f6c20de5

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

Les dissidents des Frères Musulmans forment une « Association de prédication »

Les dissidents des Frères Musulmans forment une « Association de prédication » | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

L’ancien  leader des FM Kamal el Halabawi, a confirmé à Sky News Arabia qu’il formera avec d’autres membres dissidents du FM une « association pour la prédication», afin de combler le  vide en matière de prédication en Egypte, les partis islamiques étant actuellement occupés à faire de la politique. Ce groupe inclura également des membres démissionnaires et des jeunes ayant récemment quitté les FM.

L’association est en cours d’identification des membres et des points de contacts dans différents gouvernorats.  Une demande d’’enregistrement a été déposée et elle portera probablement le nom de « l’Association pour la Construction et le Développement ».

Le travail de cette association couvrira 3 axes: la prédication, l'éducation et le développement. D’après El Halabawi, il n’a y a pas eu de contacts entre les fondateurs de l’association et les FM, ou le Parti de la Liberté & Justice, concernant ses activités.

 

Cette association ne s'engagera dans aucune activité politique (appartenance à un courant ou parti politique). Chaque membre serait libre d’adhérer à n’importe quel parti, même s’il est non-islamique.

Egypt-actus's insight:

Interrogé sur le fait de savoir si l’association répondrait positivement à une demande émanant d’un parti communiste, pour organiser une formation sur les principes et les concepts de l'Islam modéré pour ses membres, El Halabawi a déclaré qu’il accepterait une telle invitation, même si elle venait de la part de l'Eglise.


D’après lui, cette association comblerait le vide créé depuis que les partis islamistes s’occupent de politique et ont abandonné l’appel à la religion.   

El Halabawi s’est montré inquiet par l’apparition de différentes formes d'extrémisme religieux, dont notamment les accusations d’apostasie. Selon lui, l’explication de l'islam modéré serait importante pour faire face à l’extrémiste de tels groupes, qui croient que seule leur compréhension de la religion est correcte.

 

Ce type de fanatisme a été observé en Afghanistan et en Iraq, et ses adeptes ont franchi un pas supplémentaire vers la mise en application de leurs idéologies. Le plus dangereux de celles-ci étant les conséquences civiles qui résultent d’une accusation d’apostasie: sentence de mort et dépossession de tout (argent, biens, famille, etc.). Cependant, il a exclu que l’Egypte puisse devenir comme l’Afghanistan ou l’Iraq.

Le leader des FM Hani Salah el Din a affirmé que tout appel religieux était apprécié. Le FM encourage ce type d’intervention mais émet des réserves sur le timing de la mise en place de cette association. Il est surpris de voir sur les chaînes satellites plusieurs personnalités de cette association s’exprimer sur des questions politiques, alors que c’est ce qu’ils reprochent, soi-disant, aux FM!

 

Pour Salah el Din, la prédication est la pierre angulaire de la confrérie, qui se classe en tête des groupes islamiques dans ce domaine, avec des centaines de milliers « d’activistes » en Egypte et dans le monde entier. Il a également lancé un appel aux membres de la confrérie qui s’en sont éloignés à cause des activités politiques du groupe, en leur rappelant que la politique est partie intégrante de la religion.

 

Traduction par Randa CHART

 

أكد القيادي السابق بجماعة الإخوان المسلمين كمال الهلباوي، أنه، وعدد كبير من أعضاء الجماعة المنشقين عنها، بصدد تأسيس جمعية دعوية لملء “الفراغ الدعوي” في مصر بعد انشغال الأحزاب الإسلامية بالسياسة على حساب الدعوة.

وبالإضافة إلى الهلباوي ستضم الجمعية الجديدة عددًا من قيادات الإخوان المستقيلين منهم الدكتور محمد حبيب، ومختار نوح ومحمود بسيوني.

كما ستضم عددا كبيرا من شباب الإخوان الذين تركوا الجماعة أو أقيلوا منها مؤخرا.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

Égypte : l’islam n’est plus la solution

Egypt-actus's insight:

Les islamistes au pouvoir, au Caire, qui clamaient que la foi serait « la solution » aux problèmes des Égyptiens, se tournent désormais vers le FMI, alors que s’approfondissent les difficultés du pays. (...)

À la veille des élections législatives et présidentielle, les islamistes égyptiens clamaient que « l’islam est la solution » (al-islam houa el-hal en arabe), instrumentalisant jusqu’à l’absurde la religion à des fins politiques ! L’instauration de la charia était présentée comme la solution divine devant résoudre les problèmes auxquels étaient confrontés la grande masse des Égyptiens. Aujourd’hui, force est de constater que le Parti de la justice et de la liberté a vite mis au rancard son fameux slogan, pour se tourner vers le dieu FMI et celui de l’argent. (L'Humanité)

more...
No comment yet.