Égypt-actus
Follow
Find tag "Iran"
374.3K views | +78 today
Égypt-actus
Égypt-actus
revue de presse sur l'actualité culturelle, archéologique, politique et sociale de l'Égypte
Curated by Egypt-actus
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

Egypt-Iran tourism plan still alive, says Egyptian minister

Egypt-Iran tourism plan still alive, says Egyptian minister | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Efforts to foster Iranian tourism to Egypt have not been cancelled, Tourism Minister Hesham Zaazou said Wednesday morning.

His comments follow outcry by Egypt's conservative Salafis over warming ties with Shia majority Iran that prompted the ministry on Sunday to suspend flights from Tehran until the second half of June.

The flights were part of an initiative to normalize ties between the two countries after more than three decades. Egypt and Iran severed ties after the 1979 Islamic Revolution when Egypt gave sanctuary to the deposed Shah and recognized Israel in a peace treaty.

Zaazou, who is in Qatar as part of a Cabinet delegation visit, said the government is assessing the visit of the first batch of Iranian tourists.

The two nations implemented a recently signed tourism convention with the first charter flight from Tehran on 30 March, which brought 45 Iranian visitors to Aswan.

 

MENA, via Egypt independent

More : http://www.egyptindependent.com/news/egypt-iran-tourism-plan-still-alive-says-egyptian-minister

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

Les Egyptiens, iranophobies ?

Les Egyptiens, iranophobies ? | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it
Ces derniers jours , le Caire a vécu au rythme des manifs salafistes anti iraniennes : le bureau de la protection des intérêts iraniens au Caire a été attaqué, les chaines et la presse soutenues par les Frères n'ont pas cessé de dénoncer l'arrivée des touristes iraniens en Egypte et tout ceci a fini par décider le président Morsi a suspendre les vols touristiques rétablis après 34 ans, seulement  10 jours après les avoir rétablis. Tout ceci amène le lecteur à se poser la question suivante : les Egyptiens, sont-ils iranophobes? IRIBPlus : http://french.irib.ir/info/afrique2/item/251517-les-egyptiens,-iranophobes
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

Should Egypt fear Iran?

Should Egypt fear Iran? | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Two of the most important countries in the Middle East, Egypt and Iran, have begun using tourism as a tool for normalizing relations.

 

Flights have finally started up again after a break of 34 years and Iranian tourists have started to visit Egypt again. Many believe that these types of reciprocal visits will pave the way forward for the peoples of both countries to begin to understand one another and thus for the development of diplomatic relations.

 

At the same though, despite Tehran’s strong desires to see relations developed further with Egypt, the fact remains that there exists a serious anti-Iranian stance in Egyptian public opinion. Behind this public opinion is the idea that once relations improve between the two countries, Iran will use it as an opportunity to spread Shiism. Is there any real basis for this fear? There absolutely is. Though the exact numbers are not known, it is said that there are more than 10 million members of various Sufi orders throughout Egypt. It is also said that the majority of these people are not literate. And this fact creates mistrust in Iran, which sees spreading Shiism as an important part of its strategy to widen its spheres of influence.

 

For many centuries now, Iran has backed Shiism-related activities that promote its beliefs -- sometimes openly, sometimes secretly -- throughout a wide Islamic region, including of course Turkey. And Egypt, which was at one time the center of the Shiite Fatimid caliphate, has always been an important target for Iran (...) It is now feared that Iranian tourists could play the main role in helping the spread of Shiism throughout Egypt. Which is why it is being said that Egyptian officials are really only going to allow Iranian tourists to head to more designated touristic areas like Sharm el-Sheikh, Luxor and Aswan. At the same time, though, for an Egypt trying to bring in more tourism, and trying also to improve its diplomatic relations with Iran, it does not appear very possible to limit Iranian visitors to these touristic regions

 

More on: http://www.todayszaman.com/columnist-311872-should-egypt-fear-iran.html

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

AP Interview: Egypt says Iranian tourists no risk

Egypt-actus's insight:

Egypt's tourism minister says Iranian tourists would help shore up Egypt's dilapidated tourism industry and would not pose security challenge to the nation.

Speaking to The Associated Press in Cairo on Thursday, Hesham Zazou says he does not worry that visiting Iranians would try to export a revolution to Egypt.

Preparations are under way to allow Iranian tourists visit at a time when the Egyptian government is looking to boost the tourism business back to pre-revolution levels when 14.7 million tourists visited Egypt in 2010.

Continued unrest since the 2011 uprising that forced longtime authoritarian president Hosni Mubarak to step down, have scared away tourists and investment.

Last year, the number of tourists climbed to more than 10 million, but most tourists go to beach resorts along the Red Sea.

 

Huff Post

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/huff-wires/20130328/ml-egypt-tourism/?utm_medium=referral&utm_hp_ref=homepage&ir=homepage&utm_source=t.co

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

Troubling parallels, hopeful differences: Iran, women, and the 'Arab spring'

Troubling parallels, hopeful differences: Iran, women, and the 'Arab spring' | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Despite parallels with Iran, Haideh Moghissi notes more hopeful prospects for the future of women’s rights and democracy in post-Arab spring regimes.

 

It is  hard not to inspired by the popular uprisings, that have come to be known collectively as the ‘Arab Spring.’ Yet, the swift turn in favour of Islamist parties, in Egypt and Tunisia, while not unexpected, is cause for concern. For Iranian women who lived through the establishment of the Islamic regime in Iran, what we are witnessing in relation to Tunisia and Egypt is distressingly familiar. Expressing concerns over emergent regimes  in Arab countries, Nobel laureate Shirin Ebadi called upon Arab women in March 2012 to Iran. We understood very well the hidden meaning of President Morsi’s statement after his electoral victory  – that the Muslim Brotherhood’s success reflected the second conquest of Egypt by Islam.”

 

The developments that have taken place in the region, so far  justify  our misgivings. Attempts at redefining women’s rights and status in the new constitutions and at rolling back of the reforms to family law achieved in previous decades, as well as intimidating tactics for pushing women out of public spaces speak to the challenges ahead for women in the Arab counties in which military regimes were overthrown  through a revolution.  

 

Not withstanding all of the foregoing, no one can truly anticipate the direction that the Arab uprisings will take in the near future. For a variety reasons, including the lessons learned from the revolution in Iran, as well as differences between the conditions and the major players in the Iranian and the Arab contexts, it is possible, and one should certainly remain hopeful, that the unfinished revolutions, particularly in Tunisia and Egypt will produce results more favourable to the democratic forces that started the uprisings.

 

More on: http://www.opendemocracy.net/5050/haideh-moghissi/troubling-parallels-hopeful-differences-iran-women-and-arab-spring?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+opendemocracy+(openDemocracy)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

Iran’s foreign minister works to woo Egypt in Cairo visit

Iran’s foreign minister works to woo Egypt in Cairo visit | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Iran’s foreign minister on Thursday met with top Egyptian officials during a visit to the Egyptian capital that raises questions about how Egypt, the United States’ biggest Arab ally, might recalibrate its formerly standoffish relationship with Iran, America’s biggest regional foe.

Ali Akbar Salehi met with Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi, Prime Minister Hesham Kandil, Lakhdar Brahimi, the U.N. envoy to Syria, and top officials at al Azhar University, the pre-eminent source of Sunni Islamic thought – a major event, given that Iran is governed by a Shiite Muslim theocracy.


At each stop, Salehi made the case for stronger Egyptian-Iranian relations, suggesting that better ties between the two nations would reduce U.S. involvement in the region. It was a charm offensive that reached out not just to leaders, but also to average Egyptians.

 

In an interview with “Good Morning Egypt,” a state television program, Salehi said that stronger relations could lead to trade deals and that together the two states could solve regional problems without “international interference,” an oblique reference to the United States.

“Rapprochement between Cairo and Tehran does not mean being against the interests of others,” Salehi added. “Each side has its own political vision.”
After meeting with Grand Sheikh Ahmed al Tayyeb at al Azhar, Salehi address the Sunni-Shiite divide that has been an increasingly influential division between Muslims. “We all in Iran, whether we are Sunni or Shiite, we love all the Prophet’s family. All Muslims whether they are Sunni or Shiite believe in the same God.”

He also addressed the region’s current greatest sectarian crisis, the civil war in Syria, which pits a largely Sunni rebel force against the government of President Bashar Assad, whose Alawite sect is a Shiite offshoot. Improving relations and eliminating foreign involvement, Salehi said, begins by seeking ways to solve the Syrian crisis together. Neither side offered specifics about their talks on Syria, however. (...)

 

More on:  http://www.modbee.com/2013/01/10/2526877/irans-foreign-minister-works-to.html

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

Iran: Les Iraniens reviendront en Egypte

Iran: Les Iraniens reviendront en Egypte | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it
Trente-quatre ans après la rupture des relations entre Le Caire et Téhéran, les touristes iraniens peuvent de nouveau visiter l’Egypte. En fait, le ministre égyptien du Tourisme, Hicham Zaazoue, s’est rendu cette semaine à Téhéran où il a signé avec le chef de l’Organisation iranienne du patrimoine culturel, de l’artisanat et du tourisme, Mohammad Sharif Malekzadeh, un accord pour promouvoir la coopération touristique entre les deux pays.

 

Cette visite fait suite à celle dernièrement au Caire du chef de l’Etat iranien, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad. Ce dernier avait annoncé lors de cette visite l’exemption des visas pour les Egyptiens qui visitent l'Iran à des fins commerciales ou touristiques. Pourtant, elle a provoqué une grande controverse dans les milieux touristiques. Zaazoue a exprimé, lors de sa rencontre avec le président iranien, l’espoir que les relations touristiques entre Téhéran et Le Caire seront davantage renforcées. « L’expansion des liens entre Téhéran et Le Caire assurera la paix, la sécurité et la fraternité », a, pour sa part, déclaré le président Ahmadinejad.

La visite du ministre égyptien en Iran a donné lieu à un grand débat en Egypte puisqu’elle est la première d’un haut responsable égyptien à Téhéran depuis des décennies dans le cadre d’une coopération et non en marge d'une réunion internationale. Les liens entre l’Egypte et l’Iran avaient été coupés après la signature par l’Egypte du traité de paix avec Israël en 1979. Les deux pays ont opéré un timide rapprochement après la révolution du 25 janvier 2011.

Les critiques sur la visite du ministre du Tourisme en Iran portent essentiellement sur la crainte d’une expansion du chiisime en Egypte. Adel Abdel-Razeq, expert touristique, explique : « J’étais parmi ceux qui ont appelé à une ouverture sur le marché iranien mais après la visite du chef de l’Etat iranien en Egypte et son refus de parler des califes bien guidés du prophète (Ndlr : les quatre califes bien guidés sont vénérés par les sunnites mais non par les chiites), j’ai changé d’avis. Je pense qu’il est un peu tôt pour renouer avec le marché iranien. Mieux vaut attendre un peu pour se rassurer sur les intentions de l’Iran ».

 

Plus: http://hebdo.ahram.org.eg/NewsContent/0/32/97/1908/Iran-Les-Iraniens-reviendront-en-Egypte.aspx

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

Salafis plan Tahrir demo to protest Iran, Shia relations

Salafis plan Tahrir demo to protest Iran, Shia relations | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Islamist movements and Salafi parties plan to organize a demonstration in Tahrir Square on 15 March to protest what they see as normalization in relations with Iran and Shia Muslims, and to pressure the president and Muslim Brotherhood to stop exchanging visits with Iran.

The Salafi Nour and Asala parties, the Jamaa al-Islamiyas Construction and Development Party and the Muslim Rebels, Sahaba and Omatuna movements, as well as the Hazemoun — a group supporting former presidential hopeful and Salafi Sheikh Hazem Salah Abu Ismail — plan to participate.

“We will escalate the matter if the Brotherhood keeps signing agreements with Iran,” said Yehia al-Sherbiny, coordinator of the Muslim Rebels movement.

Brotherhood member Karem Radwan said the group would face any Shia “tide,” the word often used to describe what some fear is the spread of Shia Islam in mostly Sunni Egypt.

“Our relations with Iran are political, not religious,” Radwan said.

 

More on: http://arabia.msn.com/news/middle-east/1346788/salafis-plan-tahrir-demo-protest-iran/

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

A warning to John Kerry on Middle East trip: Egypt could become the next Iran

A warning to John Kerry on Middle East trip: Egypt could become the next Iran | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

As Secretary of State John Kerry heads to Egypt March 2 he should be wary of one concerning possibility: Under the rule of Mohammad Morsi and the Muslim Brotherhood, Egypt is in danger of becoming a Sunni version of the Islamic Republic of Iran. Opposition leaders’ refusal to meet with Mr. Kerry over what they perceive to be as unprincipled US support for Mr. Morsi should serve as a wake-up call and warning to Washington.

 

Morsi’s first step after winning the June 2012 presidential election was to create an alliance with other Islamic groups, and sideline seculars and liberals who could derail the establishment of a religious state. Next, he gave himself immunity from legal prosecution and managed to quickly hoard more power than deposed dictator Hosni Mubarak ever dreamed of having. After a number of maneuvers, Morsi pushed forward a constitution drafted mostly by Brotherhood members and their allies, ignoring the protests of secular opponents, Christians, women, and liberals against the discriminatory language and key articles placed in the new constitution.

 

The new constitution sets the legal ground for creating what could become an Islamic state. It restricts the role of the judicial and legislative branches and stipulates that laws and their interpretations are subject to Islamic jurisprudence. It further gives legal-oversight power on “matters related to the Islamic sharia” to Al-Azhar University, the oldest and highest Sunni religious institution in Egypt.

 

The new constitution and its wide implications for personal freedom and social justice should concern the international community. It explicitly recognizes only the three Abrahamic religions (Islam, Christianity, and Judaism), and leaves other minorities, such as those of the Baha’i faith, without meaningful constitutional protection. Strict adherence to the concept of apostasy prevents Muslims from changing their religion, a crime punishable by death. Blasphemy laws restrict freedom of expression, especially on religious matters, with retributions as severe as death for comments related to the prophet Mohammed or the Koran.

According to Sunni jurisprudence, women are subject to male guardianship under which their personal freedoms, social life, and career choices are severely restricted. This restriction is not banned under Egypt’s new constitution. And because the new constitution fails to set a minimum age for marriage and does not criminalize sexual trafficking of minors, children, especially girls, could be forced into marriages at the age of nine with the approval of their male guardians.

During the last three decades, Iran, under the control of the Islamic Shiite clergy, was transformed into a religious state with endless human rights violations. In most cases, the world stood by watching. Egypt is learning from the Iranian experience. If the political conditions in Egypt remain the same, Egypt could soon follow Iran’s footsteps. 

 

More on: http://www.csmonitor.com/Commentary/Opinion/2013/0301/A-warning-to-John-Kerry-on-Middle-East-trip-Egypt-could-become-the-next-Iran?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+feeds%2Fcommentary+%28Christian+Science+Monitor+%7C+Commentary%29

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

With economy slumping and relations warming, Egypt courts Iranians tourists

Egypt's tourism minister flew to Tehran on Monday in a bid to lure Iranian tourists to help his country's ailing economy as relations between the two regional heavyweights continues to slowly improve.

Hesham Zazou is heading a 14-person delegation that will spend five days in Iran for meetings with tour operators, travel agents and officials centered on how to promote tourism to Cairo, an Egyptian diplomat traveling with the group said.

The head of Egypt's Civil Aviation Authority, Mohammed Ibrahim Sharif, said the visit by Zazou also aims to develop use of an Iranian-Egyptian accord allowing direct flights between the two countries. To date, he said, no carriers had applied for a license to operate under the agreement, which allows for 28 direct flights per week — 14 from each nation. (...)

The Egyptian efforts underline how much has changed since Mubarak was ousted in an uprising two years ago. His successor, President Mohammed Morsi, reached out with a visit to the Shiite Muslim nation just months after winning elections last year. It was the first such trip by an Egyptian leader in decades.

Egypt was once closely allied to Iran and its former ruling shah. The two countries severed relations after the 1979 Islamic Revolution. Relations soured even more after Egypt signed a peace treaty with Israel.

In a reciprocal first visit by President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad to Egypt earlier this month, he said that Iran will lift visa requirements for Egyptian tourists and businessmen.

He also said he anticipated that many of the eight to 10 million Iranians who holiday abroad every year will start coming to Egypt.

"I came from Iran to say that both people have to support each other, and we consider the progress and strength of Egypt as the progress and strength of Iran," Ahmadinejad told reporters in Cairo at the time.

However, the sight of Iranian women, should they choose to wear the traditional Shiite cloak known as a chador, is likely to anger Egypt's ultraconservative Salafis — Sunni Muslims who follow a doctrine similar to that of the Wahhabi movement in Saudi Arabia.

Saudi Arabia and Iran are regional arch foes. Saudis have accused Iran of trying to spread its variant of Islam in the predominantly Sunni Arab world. (Fox News)

 

More : http://www.foxnews.com/world/2013/02/25/with-economy-slumping-and-relations-warming-egypt-courts-iranians-tourists/?utm_medium=referral&utm_source=t.co

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

L'Egypte veut s'ouvrir à d'autres touristes, notamment iraniens

Egypt-actus's insight:

Confronté à une baisse des visiteurs occidentaux en raison des incertitudes politiques, le gouvernement égyptien cherche à attirer de nouveaux touristes, notamment iraniens.

Le ministre du Tourisme Hisham Zaazou effectuera à partir de lundi une visite à Téhéran pour «rétablir l'activité touristique en Egypte et découvrir des marchés nouveaux et diversifiés», indique dimanche le ministère dans un communiqué. Le président iranien Mahmoud Ahmadinejad a effectué au début du mois la première visite en Egypte d'un président iranien depuis la révolution islamique de 1979.

L'activité issue du tourisme représentait encore récemment plus de 10% du PIB égyptien. En 2010, 14,7 millions de touristes s'étaient rendus en Egypte. Ils n'étaient plus que 9,8 millions en 2011.

20 minutes, avec Reutershttp://www.20minutes.fr/ledirect/1107045/egypte-veut-ouvrir-a-autres-touristes-notamment-iraniens
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

Egypt clarifies relationship with Iran

Egypt clarifies relationship with Iran | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

The Minister of Foreign Affairs released a statement on Friday clarifying Egypt’s relationship with Iran.

Mohamed Kamel Amr said that Iran is “a regional power that no one can ignore, but there are determinants of the relationship and Egypt has fixed limitations and is committed to them”.

The statement outlined these limitations, of which there are three. The first is the policy of non-interference in another country’s internal affairs and no tolerance for another country interfering in internal Egyptian affairs.

The second limitation specifies “no sectarian activity in other countries”. The third limitation is specific to Egypt’s policy on security in the Gulf. Kamel Amr equated Gulf security to Egyptian security and added that “Cairo will not have relations with any party at the expense of the security of the Gulf and will not allow any side to tamper with the security of the Gulf”.

The foreign minister’s statement comes following growing concern from the United States over Iran’s recent activity, including its nuclear programme. US State Department spokesperson Victoria Nuland said on 4 February that Ahmedinejad’s recent visit to Cairo was an “opportunity for the Egyptian Government to give him the same strong messages… about their nuclear behaviour, about their terrorist behaviour, et cetera”.

Since President Mohamed Morsi’s inauguration last year, relations between Egypt and Iran seem to have grown stronger. Relations under the former Egyptian regime were almost non-existent, but both heads of state have recently made historic visits to each other’s country. (Daily news Egypt)

 

More : http://www.dailynewsegypt.com/2013/02/23/egypt-clarifies-relationship-with-iran/

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

Following Ahmadinejad's Visit To Cairo, Egyptian Exports To Iran Vanish

Following Ahmadinejad's Visit To Cairo, Egyptian Exports To Iran Vanish | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Unlike the rates of Egyptian exports to Iran throughout the past five years, Egypt's exports to the Iranian market vanished at the beginning of 2013 to record EGP 2 million; compared to EGP 29 million in January 2012; according to sources in Foreign trade Sector to "Amwal Al Ghad".

 

The great decline in Egyptian exports to Iran coincided with the Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad's visit to Cairo and his meeting with President Mohamed Morsi. The meeting targeted pushing the Egyptian exports to Tahran markets, which attained EGP 29 million in January 2012 and EGP 88 million at the same month in 2011.

 

This tenuous exporting value in January 2013 distributed on different sectors; they are textile, chemical products and fertilizers, besides books and some artistic works.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

Iran hopes to restore tourist flights to Egypt

Iran hopes to restore tourist flights to Egypt | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it
Egypt-actus's insight:

Iran says it hopes Egypt can resume tourist flights to the country to improve relations.

"We hope to witness more visits between the two nations," said Foreign Ministry spokesman Ramin Mehmanparast on Tuesday.

Egypt suspended tourist flights from Iran on Monday. It did not give a reason but the move followed an outcry from hard-line Sunni Muslims angered about visitors from the mostly Shiite country, only a week after direct flights between the two countries resumed for the first time in more than three decades.

 

Associated Presse

More : http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/M/ML_IRAN_EGYPT_TOURIST_FLIGHTS?SECTION=HOME&SITE=AP&TEMPLATE=DEFAULT

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

L'Egypte suspend les vols touristiques venant d'Iran jusqu'en juin

Egypt-actus's insight:

Le ministre égyptien du Tourisme Hisham Zazouz a décidé de suspendre les vols touristiques venant d'Iran jusqu'à la deuxième moitié du mois de juin, rapporte dimanche l'agence de presse officielle égyptienne MENA.

M. Zazouz a justifié cette décision par la volonté des autorités égytpiennes de réévaluer et révisier les expériences et les programmes touristiques de l'Iran.

Le 28 février dernier, Zazouz et le responsable de l'Organisation de l'héritage culturuel, de l'artisanat et du tourisme, Mohammad Sharif Malekzadeh, ont signé un accord à Téhéran afin de promouvoir la coopération dans le domaine du tourisme, accord permettant le lancement de vols directs entre les deux pays.

Le 31 mars, un avion iranien transportant des touristes était arrivé à l'aéroport international d'Aswan, en Egypte.

 

CRI online

Plus : http://french.cri.cn/621/2013/04/08/581s319767.htm

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

First Egypt flight in 34 years takes off to Iran

First Egypt flight in 34 years takes off to Iran | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

An Egyptian flight left Cairo airport on Saturday heading for the Iranian capital Tehran, the first between the two countries in 33 years.

The flight by a private Egyptian airliner, owned by the business tycoon Rami Lakah, took off with eight Iranians on board, marking the operation of a direct air route between the two countries.

The flight comes a month after Egyptian Tourism Minister Hesham Zazou visited Tehran where he agreed to operate charter flights aimed at ferrying Iranian tourists to Egypt.

The Egyptian official at the time said the Iranians would not be allowed to visit religious sites, a statement obviously aimed at allaying fears in Egypt about the possible spread of Shiism by Iranians in the mainly Sunni Muslim country. Cairo houses many places revered by Shiites, who are followers of a sect of Islam.

 

Gulf news

More : http://gulfnews.com/news/region/egypt/first-egypt-flight-in-34-years-takes-off-to-iran-1.1164620

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

Egyptians Wary of Influx of Iranian Tourists

Egyptians Wary of Influx of Iranian Tourists | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Egyptians are growing wary of the potential increased activities of the Iranian Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC) in their country, and the spread of the Shi’a doctrine there, through the door of tourism. These fears are mounting in light of Cairo and Tehran’s recent resumption of charter flights between the two countries, heralding the arrival of thousands of Iranians to visit Egypt for the first time in 30 years.

Alaa Hadidi, a spokesperson for the Egyptian government, told Asharq Al-Awsat that his government will meet with some of the political forces concerned about Iranian tourism, in order to allay their fears. He added, “There are no sectarian or political purposes behind Iranian tourism. Those coming here will mainly visit the beaches, especially on the Red Sea coast.”

Since 1979, Egypt’s strategy has contrasted with that of Iran with regards to the Middle East peace process and the security of the Gulf region, which led to the severance of relations between the two countries for nearly three decades. According to diplomatic sources in Cairo, although an agreement was signed in 2010 to resume charter flights between the two countries, the former Mubarak regime did not implement it at the time because of “pressure from his Western allies.”

 

Asharq Al-Awsat

More : http://www.aawsat.net/2013/03/article55296917

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

New regulations for Iranian, Iraqi tourist groups

New regulations for Iranian, Iraqi tourist groups | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

The Foreign Ministry announced new regulations for tourists from Iran and Iraq on Thursday.

 

Egypt would agree to welcome tourist groups restricted in size from 50 to 100 individuals from the two countries, said Ali al-Ashry, the assistant foreign minister for consular affairs and Egyptian expatriates.
In addition, only three Egyptian travel agencies would be allowed to coordinate the arrival and departure of tourist groups originating from these countries, and they would be under the supervision of the Ministry of Tourism.

 

Iranian tourists would be permitted to visit certain areas, such as Luxor, Aswan, Sharm al-Sheikh and Hurghada, Ashry said. Iraqi tourist groups would be permitted to visit Cairo.

 

More on: http://www.egyptindependent.com/news/new-regulations-iranian-iraqi-tourist-groups

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

Shia-Sunni Friction Growing In Egypt

Shia-Sunni Friction Growing In Egypt | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Some of Egypt's leading Islamist parties are planning a demonstration this week in Tahrir Square to protest what they believe are warming relations between Iran and Egypt. Their concerns are not focused solely on a possible diplomatic rapprochement, but what they fear more -- creeping Shiism in Sunni lands.

Since the Egyptian revolution, Sunni animosity in Egypt toward Shia Muslims has increased and gone public in a country where, in the past, doctrinal differences between the two Islamic sects were barely mentioned.

Even at al Azhar, the mosque and university complex that is a seat for Sunni learning and where Shia jurisprudence is taught as part of the curriculum, there is far less tolerance than in the past.

"You can't trust the Shia because of taqiya," a scholar at Al Azhar told me in February when I was in Cairo. He was referring to a practice permitted in Shia Islam whereby followers may deny or otherwise obscure their religious beliefs if they feel they are under threat of persecution.

The dispensation of taqiya was particularly important historically because the Shia often lived as minorities in Sunni-dominated societies, as is the case in Egypt and much of the Arab world. The concept of taqiya does not exist in Sunni jurisprudence, but the practice of self-preservation is not unknown.

The Egyptian government under former President Hosni Mubarak considered Iran its enemy for different reasons. Since the 1979 Islamic revolution, Iran's regime articulated the grievances that many Arabs felt toward the United States and its support for dictators like Mubarak in their own countries.

 

Iran also stood with Syria as the bulwark against Israel's harsh treatment of Arabs, particularly Palestinians. Moreover, Mubarak often feared -- unjustifiably -- that Egypt's Islamists would embrace the Iranian model of a theocratic state.

 

Since the election of Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi, a leader in the Muslim Brotherhood, Iran has viewed the Islamist presidency as an opportunity, ignoring much of the criticism among Egypt's Islamists. But the reality is something different: instead of enhancing Muslim solidarity, the rise of Egypt's different strands of Islamism have served to confront Iran on political and theological grounds.(...)

 

More on: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/geneive-abdo/shiasunni-friction-growin_b_2859787.html

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

Closer Iran-Egypt ties about tourism, not religion: Tourism ministry

Closer Iran-Egypt ties about tourism, not religion: Tourism ministry | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Egypt's tourism minister, Hisham Zaazou, has spoken about the ongoing rapprochement between Egypt and Iran, describing the deepening of relations between the two states as aimed at promoting tourism, and not political" or "religious. Al Ahramonline reported".

A recent visit by Iranian President Ahmadinejad to Cairo in February was considered by many observers to be a groundbreaking step in relations between Egypt, a majority Sunni nation, and the Shia state of Iran.

Promoting Iranian tourism in Egypt is not part of an Iranian "Shia-ization" scheme for the Middle East, and will not undermine Sunni values or dogmas, said Zaazou in an interview with Ahram's Arabic website.

(...) "We were keen to protect Egypt's national security and sovereignty during the negotiations, and all security risks were taken into consideration before signing the agreement," said Zaazou.(..)

The Fatimid area of Cairo holds religious sites and the graveyards of important Shia figures that could be a potential point of interest for Iranian tourists.

Ahmadinejad shed tears during a visit to the Sayyeda Zeinab Mosque in Old Cairo last month. Several Salafist groups held angry demonstrations, protesting the visit.

 

"Iran has normal relations and diplomatic missions with a lot of countries in the world except for the United States and Israel," said Zaazou, dismissing reports that rapprochement with Iran presents a security risk to Egypt.

Almost 10 million Iranian tourists visit Gulf countries and Europe each year, and Egypt should start benefiting from this significant flow of tourists, the minister of tourism said.

"Turkey alone receives almost 2 million Iranian tourists annually(...)

Ahmadinejad's visit to the Cairo was met by widespread discontent by some ultra-conservative groups that perceived the growing relations between the two countries as an "attack" on the Sunni sect.

The "Coalition of Muslims for the Defence of the Prophet's Companions and Family" has called for a million-man march on 15 March to protest what they called "normalisation with the Iranian entity."

In a press statement, the coalition demanded President Morsi re-freeze relations with Iran, as they could threaten Egypt's national sovereignty and spread the Shia sect in the predominantly

 

More on: http://en.trend.az/regions/met/arabicr/2126098.html

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

A warning to John Kerry on Middle East trip: Egypt could become the next Iran

As Secretary of State John Kerry heads to Egypt March 2 he should be wary of one concerning possibility: Under the rule of Mohammad Morsi and the Muslim Brotherhood, Egypt is in danger of becoming a Sunni version of the Islamic Republic of Iran. Opposition leaders’ refusal to meet with Mr. Kerry over what they perceive to be as unprincipled US support for Mr. Morsi should serve as a wake-up call and warning to Washington.

Morsi’s first step after winning the June 2012 presidential election was to create an alliance with other Islamic groups, and sideline seculars and liberals who could derail the establishment of areligious state. Next, he gave himself immunity from legal prosecution and managed to quickly hoard more power than deposed dictator Hosni Mubarak ever dreamed of having. After a number of maneuvers, Morsi pushed forward a constitution drafted mostly by Brotherhood members and their allies, ignoring the protests of secular opponents, Christians, women, and liberals against the discriminatory language and key articles placed in the new constitution.

The new constitution sets the legal ground for creating what could become an Islamic state. It restricts the role of the judicial and legislative branches and stipulates that laws and their interpretations are subject to Islamic jurisprudence. It further gives legal-oversight power on “matters related to the Islamic sharia” to Al-Azhar University, the oldest and highest Sunni religious institution in Egypt. (Nesreen Akhtarkhavari | Christian Science Monitor, via Yahoo news)

 

More : http://news.yahoo.com/warning-john-kerry-middle-east-trip-egypt-could-160753073--politics.html;_ylt=A2KJNF9L8DBREFQAJpn_wgt.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

L'Iran et l'Égypte signent un protocole d'entente sur le tourisme

L'Iran et l'Égypte signent un protocole d'entente sur le tourisme | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

Mercredi, le ministre du Tourisme égyptien Hisham Zazouz et le chef de l'Organisation iranienne du Patrimoine culturel, de l'Artisanat et du Tourisme Mohammad Sharif Malekzadeh ont signé un accord dans la capitale iranienne de Téhéran pour promouvoir la coopération touristique, selon l'agence de presse semi-officielle Fars. M. Zazouz a exprimé l'espoir que les relations touristiques entre Téhéran et Le Caire seront renforcées davantage, ajoutant que le peuple égyptien est intéressé par la civilisation iranrienne.

Toujours mercredi, le président iranien Mahmoud Ahmadinejad a rencontré M. Zazouz, soulignant l'importance de l'amélioration des relations bilatérales entre la République islamique et l'Egypte dans tous les domaines, notamment dans le secteur du tourisme.

 

M. Ahmadinejad a déclaré que l'expansion des liens entre Téhéran et Le Caire assurera « la paix, la sécurité et la fraternité », ajoutant que la coopération touristique entre les deux pays contribuera au renforcement des bilatérales dans les domaines économique, commercialet et scientifique entre les deux pays. (...)

 

Plus:http://www.afriquinfos.com/articles/2013/2/28/liran-legypte-signent-protocole-dentente-tourisme-218413.asp

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

Tourism minister to visit Iran in bid for tourism boost

The tourism minister is visiting Iran Sunday in an attempt to boost tourism and restore relations after 30 years of cut relations between the two countries.

 

President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad visited Egypt earlier this month. He is the first Iranian president to visit Egypt since the Iranian Islamic Revolution in 1979, and has called for a strategic alliance with Cairo.

 

The revolution that toppled President Hosni Mubarak in January 2011 adversely affected Egyptian tourism.

 

Before the revolution, tourism accounted for more than 10 percent of the gross domestic product, with 14.7 million incoming tourists in 2010, generating US$12.5 billion in revenue. The following year, 9.8 million tourists came, generating US$8.8 billion.




Almasry Alyoum (Egypt.com)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

Egypt seeks tourism boost after Ahmadinejad visit

Egypt seeks tourism boost after Ahmadinejad visit | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it
Egypt's tourism minister is heading to Tehran, the government said on Sunday, as Cairo tries to halt sliding visitor numbers and thaws relations with Iran after a 30-year freeze.

Minister Hisham Zaazou will visit the Iranian capital from Monday under a drive "to restore tourism activity into Egypt and discover new and diverse markets", the Tourism Ministry said in a statement.

 

Last month President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad became the first Iranian leader to visit Egypt since Tehran's 1979 Islamic revolution, and called for a strategic alliance with Cairo.

 

Egypt's tourism sector has suffered since a popular uprising toppled president Hosni Mubarak in 2011. Waves of riots and instability have driven many tourists away.(...)

 

Egypt's tourism sector has suffered since a popular uprising toppled president Hosni Mubarak in 2011. Waves of riots and instability have driven many tourists away.

 

Tourism used to account for more than a tenth of Egypt's gross domestic product (GDP) before the uprising. In 2010, around 14.7 million visitors came to Egypt, generating around $12.5 billion, but this slumped to 9.8 million people in 2011, bringing in $8.8 billion.

 

More on: http://uk.news.yahoo.com/egypt-seeks-tourism-boost-ahmadinejad-visit-163251867.html

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Egypt-actus
Scoop.it!

Al-Azhar in response to Iranian news agency: We have only one face

Al-Azhar in response to Iranian news agency: We have only one face | Égypt-actus | Scoop.it

In response to a report that the news conference held after Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejads meeting with Al-Azhars grand sheikh had been unscheduled, Al-Azhar said Wednesday that it has “only one face and one discourse, and transparency is our priority, and it is not true that the press conference came as a surprise to anyone.” (...)

During the news conference, the senior Al-Azhar cleric told Ahmadinejad that he should not seek to meddle in Gulf states affairs, nor attempt to spread the Shia Islam in the region. The statements, which amounted to a public scolding of the visiting leader, drew much media attention both at home and abroad — highlighting the many ideological divisions between the two unlikely bedfellows.

 

The Iranian news agency Fars on its Arabic-language website published what it described as previously “unpublished details on the Iranian presidents talks with Al-Azhar scholars,” which gave an account that differed from the one circulated in Egyptian media.

 

Fars cited Ahmed Mousavi, chairperson of the Iranian Hajj and Pilgrimage Organization, as saying that Ahmadinejad was not scheduled to hold a news conference after the Iranian delegations meeting with Tayyeb, adding that such conferences in which the Iranian president was to take part had been scheduled in advance.

 

According to London-based Asharq Al-Awsats Thursday issue, Al-Azhar said, “There was nothing but complete honesty and transparency, and the conference was held in that spirit, and President Ahmadinejad shook hands firmly with Hassan al-Shafie.”

 

Mousavi added that during the conference, Al-Azhar officials “were trying to bring up the problems between Shias and Sunnis, and the Syrian issue, prompting us to threaten to leave the press conference if controversial issues were discussed in public.”

 

In its response statement, Al-Azhar said the Iranian president wanted to visit the Islamic institution, and he was well-received by the grand sheikh and a group from the Al-Azhar Supreme Council of Scholars. The response said that after the meeting the Iranian president and his delegation, they were told Tayyeb does not take part in news conferences and that his senior adviser, Shafie, would be present on his behalf at the conference, which the Iranian president and his delegation did not mind at all.(...)

 

The Iranian president was disappointed by the choice of Shafie because Iran is seeking to spread Shia doctrine in Egypt,” a source from Al-Azhar said.

The source added that Ahmadinejad had a private conversation with Shafie in which the senior Al-Azhar adviser said, “We regret to continuously hear insults to the companions of [Prophet Mohamed] and Prophet Mohameds wives. This is altogether rejected.”

 

More on: http://arabia.msn.com/news/middle-east/1317338/alazhar-response-iranian-news-agency/

more...
No comment yet.