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Teen sleep: Why is your teen so tired?

Teen sleep: Why is your teen so tired? | School Emma Collins | Scoop.it
Teen sleep cycles may not match family and school schedules. Help them synchronize.
Emma Collins's insight:

A- Teens fall asleep around 11 o clock at night or later.

 

A-Teens need nine or more hours of sleep to stay alert during the day.

Most teens don't get that amount of sleep due to homework, classes or online socializing. Most teens get about six hours of sleep.

 

S-  One suggestion is to turn the lights of in your teens room at night but turn them on again in the morning. Light helps wake teens up.

 

S- Another helpful hint is to have your teen stick to a schedule of waking up and falling asleep at a certain time even on the weekends.

 

S- Something else that may be helpful is to have your teen take a nap during the day. A reccommended time period for a nap is a half an hour. If our teen sleeps any longer than that, it may throw off their nightime sleeping schedule. 

 

S- Another suggestion is dont drink caffeine. Caffeine keeps you awake for awhile but then you crash and get even more tired then you were before.

 

S- Doing calm activities before bed can help relax you enough to fall asleep. Turn off computers, tv's and phones and read a book or take a warm shower before sleeping. Dont listen loud music because that will wake you up and make it hard for you to sleep.

 

 

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My Nose Made Me Buy It: How Retailers Use Smell (and Other Tricks) to Get You to Spend, Spend, Spend | TIME.com

My Nose Made Me Buy It: How Retailers Use Smell (and Other Tricks) to Get You to Spend, Spend, Spend | TIME.com | School Emma Collins | Scoop.it
Think you're using your head to make purchases? Think again.
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Concussions: What you should know

Emma Collins's insight:

http://elibrary.bigchalk.com/elibweb/elib/do/document?set=search&dictionaryClick=&secondaryNav=advance&groupid=1&requestid=lib_standard&resultid=19&edition=&ts=0213A98DA46D0F1F52FD812A078DCFC7_1389569728828&start=1&publicationId=&urn=urn%3Abigchalk%3AUS%3BBCLib%3Bdocument%3B212221048

 

 

D: Teens are at higher risk with concussions because their brains are stilll developing, so they have less protection and can be damaged easier than an adult's brain.

 

S: Doctors suggest small amounts of exercise to help with concussions, like walking or jogging slowly.

 

 

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Tips for sleepy teens

Emma Collins's insight:

http://elibrary.bigchalk.com/elibweb/elib/do/document?set=search&dictionaryClick=&secondaryNav=advance&groupid=1&requestid=lib_standard&resultid=20&edition=&ts=825FB7B94EDE9B40455D39EB04F770C1_1389818036653&start=1&publicationId=&urn=urn%3Abigchalk%3AUS%3BBCLib%3Bdocument%3B196023309 

 

 

 

A= amount of sleep needed

C=causes of tiredness

S= suggestions for improving sleep

 

A- Teens normally fall asleep around 11 o clock or later.

 

A- Teens need nine hours of sleep to be able to stay awake during the day

 

A- On weekends teens should go to bed earlier and wake up at any time under ten o clock. 

 

C- Teens can be tired from lack of sleep, too much studying, too much time watching tv or socializing online. 

 

S- Doctors suggest  having your teen learn to wake up on their own.

 

S- Another suggestion is having your teen keep a log of their amounts of sleep. This will help them see how little sleep they are getting and this may help them finish homework earlier.

 

S- Another suggestion is to have your teen wake up at 8 am on the weekends so they don't mess up their internal clock.

 

S- Another way is to keep your teens room dark when they go to sleep, but let light into the room when they wake up. Light in the morning will help wake teens up.

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High school athletes found more vulnerable to concussions

High school athletes found more vulnerable to concussions | School Emma Collins | Scoop.it
High school athletes are more at risk of concussions than their collegiate counterparts, a study finds.
Emma Collins's insight:

D=dangers

G=guidelines

S=suggestions

 

D: High school athletes can get concussions more often that college athletes.

D: The player's safety equipment does not protect the player against a concussion.

 

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