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Housing Patterns

Housing Patterns | EGHS Geography | Scoop.it
See the big picture of how suburban developments are changing the country's landscape, with aerial photos and ideas for the future

Via Seth Dixon
Heather Ramsey's insight:

Cities can develop in many ways, and this webpage shows the different patterns that can be seen from the air in suburban areas around the country. Boulder, CO is featured as the author explains several suburban settlements. Many of these patterns can be found around the Denver Metro area.

 

Did you know that the streets in Denver were originally set up to run parallel and perpendicular to Cherry Creek? Because of the angle of the creek, the streets in downtown Denver do not run exactly north/south/east/west. As more and more people settled in Colorado, they set up large homesteads surrounding the town. One homesteader named Henry Brown decided that the roads on his homestead would be laid out directly north and south/east and west. Henry Brown is the reason why the Capitol Hill neighborhood of Denver (which sits on his old homestead) has a different street grid than the downtown area.

 

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Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, December 10, 2013 4:13 PM

A very interesting article on changes in landscape, while looking though this I came aross so many little things i never noticed about the topical layout of housing. The main thing that is apparent is density, how closely each house is put together, the amount of land each has as well as the view from the property. Its aslo interesting to see how the design of the area can be made for easy access or be desigend to keep people out with only one enctancte and exit. All of these charasticts make up how the land is desired as well as econimcly priced, which then determins who will be able to live there.

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 15, 2013 8:53 PM

Having the streets interconnected allows for easy  traveling throughout the area.  when there is more density in an area it means there are more houses , more people.  The sprawl has the center on the place and the streets go out around it. The way the streets are made are for different reasons,.

megan b clement's comment, December 16, 2013 12:57 AM
This article talks about twenty different housing patterns and how we base these housing patterns around our society or enviroment. How looking at housing patterns can tell you what kind of neighborhood one lives in from the sky. Looking down and seeing a golf course with lush grass and big backyards shows you that this neighborhood is very expensive. Or Canal houses that utilize every inch of the waters edge to financially make them able to charge higher prices for the homes because each house has a water view and is on the waters edge.
EGHS Geography
Hot topics and current events relevant to Geography students at Emily Griffith High School in Denver, CO.
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Emily Griffith High School | Denver Public Schools

Emily Griffith High School | Denver Public Schools | EGHS Geography | Scoop.it

My name is Heather Ramsey and I am a Social Studies teacher at Emily Griffith High School in Denver, CO.

 

We are an alternative school that focuses on retrieving students aged 17 to 21 who left high school before earning a diploma.

 

A big focus at our school is student engagement, and my goal is to use technology as a resource to help me engage my students. “Scooping” and sharing content is a way in which I can promote literacy with Social Studies students. I include questions in my scoops so that students can respond to the content and practice writing skills for credit toward their course.

 

I hope you enjoy the content as much as I enjoy finding it. A big thank you to other curators for the excellent content they provide!

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Why Do We Move? Did the Reasons Change Over Time? | Random Samplings - US Census Bureau Blog

Why Do We Move? Did the Reasons Change Over Time? | Random Samplings - US Census Bureau Blog | EGHS Geography | Scoop.it
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If you’re on the beach, this map shows you what’s across the ocean

If you’re on the beach, this map shows you what’s across the ocean | EGHS Geography | Scoop.it
The map above shows the countries that are due east and west from points along the coasts of North and South America. Many small island nations are (perhaps unfairly) excluded for ease of reading. Many thanks to Eric Odenheimer for sharing the map with Know More.

Via Michael Miller
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Rescooped by Heather Ramsey from Mr. D's AP US History
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The Most Popular Baseball Team by County

The Most Popular Baseball Team by County | EGHS Geography | Scoop.it
In honor of Opening Day, Facebook released data on the most popular Major League teams in every county.

Via AP US History
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Thematic Maps - Geography - U.S. Census Bureau

Thematic Maps - Geography - U.S. Census Bureau | EGHS Geography | Scoop.it
Thematic maps created by the Geography Division of the US Census Bureau
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23 Photos Of People From All Over The World Next To How Much Food They Eat Per Day

23 Photos Of People From All Over The World Next To How Much Food They Eat Per Day | EGHS Geography | Scoop.it
Photographers Peter Menzel and Faith D’Aluisio, who also happen to be married, traveled around the world and met people from all walks of life.

During their time with these people, they asked them to pose for photographs with their daily diets in front of them. The craziest part about the entire project is the caloric intake difference between people of different walks of life.
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Why 'Brain Drain' Can Actually Benefit African Countries

Why 'Brain Drain' Can Actually Benefit African Countries | EGHS Geography | Scoop.it
A new study reveals that the farther African migrants move, the more they increase exports in their home countries.
Heather Ramsey's insight:

This is an interesting, although less-commonly heard analysis of the impacts of emigration.

 

Here is an opposing opinion: nyti.ms/1oK6dM4

 

For students: Summarize and contrast the opinions of the authors in the two articles linked in this post.

 

Bonus: Evaluate the opinions of each author. Be sure to explain your thinking.

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The Internet Is Obsessed With Maps — Here's Why It's Gone Too Far

The Internet Is Obsessed With Maps — Here's Why It's Gone Too Far | EGHS Geography | Scoop.it

"The internet is obsessed with maps. They're used to convey everything from prison populations to regional economies to every state's favorite college. But they aren't always the best way to explain information.

Slate's Ben Blatt discussed some examples of bad maps — and why people like them so much, concluding that "people tend to be very trusting of maps."

But poorly made maps are only on the rise..."


Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/the-internets-maps-obsession-2014-5#ixzz31t8J8yWD


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 13, 9:25 PM

This may seem like the wrong place to be saying this, but any cartophile with an abiding love for a truly fantastic map will know that there are an amazing number of horrible maps out there.  This is a nice, thoughtful article explaining some reasons for the problem and how to become a more discerning consumer of maps and visual information. 

Whitney Souery's curator insight, May 29, 12:20 PM

If this is the only way to get people interested in thinking geographically, then I think it shouldn't stop.However, if we were to work and improve the geographic thinking of US citizens, it would probably be best to map these topics on a global scale rather than simply emphasizing the well known geography of the US. With that said, Americans obsession with mapping "trivial" topics does inspire an interest in geography. 

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 18, 11:40 AM

unit 1 bad bad maps

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Ranchers Wary As U.S. Considers Brazilian Beef Imports

Ranchers Wary As U.S. Considers Brazilian Beef Imports | EGHS Geography | Scoop.it
The U.S. wants to allow imports of fresh beef from Brazil, but the country's livestock has a history of foot-and-mouth disease. American ranchers worry about the risk and lower beef prices.
Heather Ramsey's insight:
For students: How does the topic of this article serve as an example of economic interdependence and globalization?
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Here's Why Americans Are Fleeing the Suburbs

Here's Why Americans Are Fleeing the Suburbs | EGHS Geography | Scoop.it
The young increasingly want to live in cities (RT @APforStudents: #aphumangeo #apecon #apush RT @Time: Here's why Americans are fleeing the suburbs http://t.co/X331kcEDee)...

Via Mr. David Burton
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How to move a town two miles east

How to move a town two miles east | EGHS Geography | Scoop.it
A 20-year project to move a town in Lapland two miles from its current location in the Arctic Circle is about to begin.
Heather Ramsey's insight:

This is quite an undertaking! The process of moving the town of Kiruna will span a generation. Can you imagine growing up during the transition? It's an excellent example of how the way we change our landscape can affect us over time.

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Made In The USA: Childless Chinese Turn To American Surrogates

Made In The USA: Childless Chinese Turn To American Surrogates | EGHS Geography | Scoop.it
Growing numbers of Chinese have hired American surrogates, allowing a couple to get around China's ban on the procedure and its birth limits. It also guarantees a coveted U.S. passport.
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Urban Risk Assessments: Understanding Disaster and Climate Risk in Cities

Urban Risk Assessments: Understanding Disaster and Climate Risk in Cities | EGHS Geography | Scoop.it
The Urban Risk Assessment presents a flexible approach that project and city managers can use to identify feasible measures to assess a city’s risk to natural disasters and climate change.
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Threats of the World's Coral Reefs


Via dilaycock
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dilaycock's curator insight, June 4, 11:04 PM

Nice summary.Useful discussion starter.

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Nation's largest ocean desalination plant goes up near San Diego; Future of the California coast?

Nation's largest ocean desalination plant goes up near San Diego; Future of the California coast? | EGHS Geography | Scoop.it
With technology improving and the drought worsening, momentum is gathering for more desalination projects along the California coast. But high costs and environmental impacts loom large
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Rescooped by Heather Ramsey from Mr. D's AP US History
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The Best Map Ever Made of America's Racial Segregation

The Best Map Ever Made of America's Racial Segregation | EGHS Geography | Scoop.it
Drawing on data from the 2010 U.S. Census, the map shows one dot per person, color-coded by race. That's 308,745,538 dots in all.

 

White: blue dots; African American: green dots; Asian: red; Latino: orange; all others: brown

Last year, a pair of researchers from Duke University published a report with a bold title: “The End of the Segregated Century.” U.S. cities, the authors concluded, were less segregated in 2012 than they had been at any point since 1910. But less segregated does not necessarily mean integrated–something this incredible map makes clear in vivd color.

The map, created by Dustin Cable at University of Virginia’s Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service, is stunningly comprehensive. Drawing on data from the 2010 U.S. Census, it shows one dot per person, color-coded by race. That’s 308,745,538 dots in all–around 7 GB of visual data. It isn’t the first map to show the country’s ethnic distribution, nor is it the first to show every single citizen, but it is the first to do both, making it the most comprehensive map of race in America ever created.


Via Seth Dixon, AP US History
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Whitney Souery's curator insight, May 28, 6:41 PM

We can use maps to think spatially,make connections, and find patterns. Maps can also be used as a way to compare change over time, as in this particular case where maps from the present were compared with maps from over fifty years ago when racial segregation was plainly obvious. Now, however, when we compare past maps with those of the present, the change over time factor becomes clearly evident, revealing why maps are so useful in determining continuities or changes.

Rescooped by Heather Ramsey from Mr. D's AP US History
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The 5 U.S. Counties Where Racial Diversity Is Highest—and Lowest

The 5 U.S. Counties Where Racial Diversity Is Highest—and Lowest | EGHS Geography | Scoop.it
Why are Alaska's Aleutian Islands so ethnically mixed? And other questions from a new map of U.S. populations.

Via Kristen McDaniel, AP US History
Heather Ramsey's insight:

For students:

 

What factors do you think should be considered when interpreting the map of racial diversity above? What conclusion can you draw when you compare the map above to this map of population density in the U.S. (linked below)?

 

http://www.census.gov/geo/maps-data/maps/pdfs/thematic/us_popdensity_2010map.pdf

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Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, April 30, 2:01 PM

The article in itself is interesting, bu the links to five different maps of diversity could be the start of some fascinating classroom discussions.  

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Study: Americans Less Fearful Of Storms Named After Women

Study: Americans Less Fearful Of Storms Named After Women | EGHS Geography | Scoop.it
People are less likely to seek shelter or otherwise prepare for storms given female names, researchers say. As a result, such storms result in nearly twice as many deaths as those with male names.
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Rescooped by Heather Ramsey from AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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Colorado River Reaches the Sea of Cortez

Colorado River Reaches the Sea of Cortez | EGHS Geography | Scoop.it

"When the Minute 319 'pulse flow' began in March 2014, it was not clear whether the effort would be enough to reconnect the Colorado River with the Sea of Cortez. Some hydrologists thought there might be just enough water; others were less optimistic. It turns out the optimists were right, though just barely. For the first time in sixteen years, the Colorado River was reunited with the Sea of Cortez on May 15, 2014."


Via Seth Dixon, Mike Busarello's Digital Textbooks
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 28, 5:57 PM

California has had three consecutive years of below average rainfall and most reservoirs are far below their designed capacity; amid a drought this severe and wildfires, it is startling to hear of a project to restore some of the Colorado River Basin's natural patterns and ecology.  


Tags: physicalremote sensing, California, water, environmenturban ecology.

Kate Buckland's curator insight, June 7, 7:43 PM

Parallels with the Murray River...

Rescooped by Heather Ramsey from AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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CH 2: The End of the Population Pyramid

CH 2: The End of the Population Pyramid | EGHS Geography | Scoop.it
This is a surfer’s dream: catching a great wave, far from the shore, and riding it for long beautiful moments as it stretches further and further gathering momentum until the very end, when it breaks right at the beach. This is how my generation, born in the 1970s (when the Beach Boys released their iconic Surf’s Up album), should feel, as we are riding on a “global demographic wave” which keeps extending further and further.  

Via Mr Ortloff, Mike Busarello's Digital Textbooks
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Rescooped by Heather Ramsey from Southmoore AP Human Geography
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Rethinking the Demographic Transition Model: Stage 5? Maybe so! | Newgeography.com

Rethinking the Demographic Transition Model: Stage 5? Maybe so! | Newgeography.com | EGHS Geography | Scoop.it

Eighty-two years after the original development of the four stage Demographic Transition Model (DTM) by the late demographer Warren Thompson (1887-1973), the cracks are starting to show on the model that for many years revolutionised how we think about the geography of our global population.


Via Mr. David Burton
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Sally Egan's curator insight, September 8, 2013 7:41 AM

Well explained this is an update on the Demographic Transition Model, taking into account the prospect of negative population growth.

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Historic "Pulse Flow" Brings Water to Parched Colorado River Delta

Historic "Pulse Flow" Brings Water to Parched Colorado River Delta | EGHS Geography | Scoop.it
A binational agreement called Minute 319 brings life to Colorado River Delta after five decades of withdrawal.
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Farmers And Frackers Wrangle For Water In Shadow Of Calif. Drought

Farmers And Frackers Wrangle For Water In Shadow Of Calif. Drought | EGHS Geography | Scoop.it

California's drought has developed an interesting relationship between farmers and oilers: California oil wells produce more water than oil, and Chevron filters that water and sells it to a local water district. Interest in the technology is growing in the Central Valley, but high costs and uneasy relations between oil and agriculture might get in the way.

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A Map of Baseball Nation

A Map of Baseball Nation | EGHS Geography | Scoop.it

"Fans may not list which team they favor on the census, but millions of them do make their preferences public on Facebook. Using aggregated data provided by the company, we were able to create an unprecedented look at the geography of baseball fandom, going down not only to the county level, as Facebook did in a nationwide map it released a few weeks ago, but also to ZIP codes."


Via Seth Dixon
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Brian Altonen's curator insight, April 25, 7:51 PM

Anything can be mapped.  

 

This mapping did not fully account for hybridization--for example when a friend in Texas is a Boston Red Sox fan.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 28, 10:43 AM

unit 1 & 3

Greg Russak's curator insight, April 29, 12:53 PM

Maps and baseball - a good combination!

Rescooped by Heather Ramsey from AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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Map - The 47% of the US where nobody lives

Map - The 47% of the US where nobody lives | EGHS Geography | Scoop.it

A Block is the smallest area unit used by the U.S. Census Bureau for tabulating statistics. As of the 2010 census, the United States consists of 11,078,300 Census Blocks. Of them, 4,871,270 blocks totaling 4.61 million square kilometers were reported to have no population living inside them. Despite having a population of more than 310 million people, 47 percent of the USA remains unoccupied.

 

Green shading indicates unoccupied Census Blocks. A single inhabitant is enough to omit a block from shading


Via Mathijs Booden, Mike Busarello's Digital Textbooks
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Building a better home for refugee children and families | IKEA Foundation

Building a better home for refugee children and families | IKEA Foundation | EGHS Geography | Scoop.it

"Every year, millions of children lose almost everything—their homes, belongings and families—in natural disasters and conflicts. Many stay in camps for years."

Heather Ramsey's insight:

See also:    http://www.ikeafoundation.org/ikea-flat-pack-solutions-are-making-a-big-difference-to-refugees/

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