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Housing Patterns

Housing Patterns | EGHS Geography | Scoop.it
See the big picture of how suburban developments are changing the country's landscape, with aerial photos and ideas for the future

Via Seth Dixon
Heather Ramsey's insight:

Cities can develop in many ways, and this webpage shows the different patterns that can be seen from the air in suburban areas around the country. Boulder, CO is featured as the author explains several suburban settlements. Many of these patterns can be found around the Denver Metro area.

 

Did you know that the streets in Denver were originally set up to run parallel and perpendicular to Cherry Creek? Because of the angle of the creek, the streets in downtown Denver do not run exactly north/south/east/west. As more and more people settled in Colorado, they set up large homesteads surrounding the town. One homesteader named Henry Brown decided that the roads on his homestead would be laid out directly north and south/east and west. Henry Brown is the reason why the Capitol Hill neighborhood of Denver (which sits on his old homestead) has a different street grid than the downtown area.

 

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Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, December 10, 2013 1:13 PM

A very interesting article on changes in landscape, while looking though this I came aross so many little things i never noticed about the topical layout of housing. The main thing that is apparent is density, how closely each house is put together, the amount of land each has as well as the view from the property. Its aslo interesting to see how the design of the area can be made for easy access or be desigend to keep people out with only one enctancte and exit. All of these charasticts make up how the land is desired as well as econimcly priced, which then determins who will be able to live there.

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 15, 2013 5:53 PM

Having the streets interconnected allows for easy  traveling throughout the area.  when there is more density in an area it means there are more houses , more people.  The sprawl has the center on the place and the streets go out around it. The way the streets are made are for different reasons,.

megan b clement's comment, December 15, 2013 9:57 PM
This article talks about twenty different housing patterns and how we base these housing patterns around our society or enviroment. How looking at housing patterns can tell you what kind of neighborhood one lives in from the sky. Looking down and seeing a golf course with lush grass and big backyards shows you that this neighborhood is very expensive. Or Canal houses that utilize every inch of the waters edge to financially make them able to charge higher prices for the homes because each house has a water view and is on the waters edge.
EGHS Geography
Hot topics and current events relevant to Geography students at Emily Griffith High School in Denver, CO.
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Emily Griffith High School | Denver Public Schools

Emily Griffith High School | Denver Public Schools | EGHS Geography | Scoop.it

My name is Heather Ramsey and I am a Social Studies teacher at Emily Griffith High School in Denver, CO.

 

We are an alternative school that focuses on retrieving students aged 17 to 21 who left high school before earning a diploma.

 

A big focus at our school is student engagement, and my goal is to use technology as a resource to help me engage my students. “Scooping” and sharing content is a way in which I can promote literacy with Social Studies students. I include questions in my scoops so that students can respond to the content and practice writing skills for credit toward their course.

 

I hope you enjoy the content as much as I enjoy finding it. A big thank you to other curators for the excellent content they provide!

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Map - The 47% of the US where nobody lives

Map - The 47% of the US where nobody lives | EGHS Geography | Scoop.it

A Block is the smallest area unit used by the U.S. Census Bureau for tabulating statistics. As of the 2010 census, the United States consists of 11,078,300 Census Blocks. Of them, 4,871,270 blocks totaling 4.61 million square kilometers were reported to have no population living inside them. Despite having a population of more than 310 million people, 47 percent of the USA remains unoccupied.

 

Green shading indicates unoccupied Census Blocks. A single inhabitant is enough to omit a block from shading


Via Mathijs Booden, Mike Busarello's Digital Textbooks
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Building a better home for refugee children and families | IKEA Foundation

Building a better home for refugee children and families | IKEA Foundation | EGHS Geography | Scoop.it

"Every year, millions of children lose almost everything—their homes, belongings and families—in natural disasters and conflicts. Many stay in camps for years."

Heather Ramsey's insight:

See also:    http://www.ikeafoundation.org/ikea-flat-pack-solutions-are-making-a-big-difference-to-refugees/

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California's Drought

California's Drought | EGHS Geography | Scoop.it
California has had three consecutive years of below average rainfall and most reservoirs are far below their designed capacity; for a state with a growing population with limited water resources th...
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How To Weather the Zombie Apocalypse - weather.com

How To Weather the Zombie Apocalypse - weather.com | EGHS Geography | Scoop.it
Imagine a world absent of traditional society. A widespread outbreak has wiped out the majority of the population. The government has failed, and there is no unified system of order. Oh yeah, and the planet is crawling with flesh-eating reanimated corpses, otherwise known as zombies.
Heather Ramsey's insight:

This was published by the Weather Channel a few years ago, but it goes along with some of the topics we discuss when planning post-apocalyptic settlements in Geography class.

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27 Magical Photos That Prove Why Getting The Airplane Window Seat Is Absolutely Necessary.

27 Magical Photos That Prove Why Getting The Airplane Window Seat Is Absolutely Necessary. | EGHS Geography | Scoop.it
I'm NEVER falling asleep on an airplane again!

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Plane Search Shows World's Oceans Are Full of Trash

Plane Search Shows World's Oceans Are Full of Trash | EGHS Geography | Scoop.it
Before Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 went missing, sea trash was not a global headliner.
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The World's Most Densely Populated Cities

The World's Most Densely Populated Cities | EGHS Geography | Scoop.it
The growth of these cities will create a host of environmental and health problems.

 

By 2210, the global population is expected to grow from just more than 7 billion to 11.3 billion — with 87 percent of the population living in urban areas, according to a new working paper by researchers from NYU’s Marron Institute.

Most of these individuals will be in what’s now the developing world — creating a host of environmental and health problems.

If projections are correct, these new urban dwellers will require the world’s existing cities to expand six-fold to accommodate triple the residents, Richard Florida wrote in The Atlantic. Plus, the world will need 500 new “megacities” of 10 million or more, he wrote.


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Lola Ripollés's curator insight, March 25, 3:42 PM

Pointed out in the latest report on Construction Industry 

Trends by Accenture, the rise of the Megacities will empower construction whilst raising many environmental and health problems.

Valerie Bauwens's curator insight, March 28, 1:46 AM

Or will there be a natural come back to the country side?

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 2, 2:42 PM

 Cairo, Egypt has a population density of 9,400 residents per square kilometer. THese numbers are crazy think about it compared to MA or RI and our major cities.

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Is That Someone's House? What Astronauts Can See Looking Down

Is That Someone's House? What Astronauts Can See Looking Down | EGHS Geography | Scoop.it
A mysterious dark spot in downtown Tokyo. A flock of dancing dots in the Pacific. A town that's half orange, half green. Astronaut puzzlers seen from space.
Heather Ramsey's insight:

Very awesome!

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Do massive dams ever make sense?

Do massive dams ever make sense? | EGHS Geography | Scoop.it
A new report argues that large dams are a risky investment - expensive and failing to deliver promised benefits. Why?
Heather Ramsey's insight:

For students: SUMMARIZE the opinion of the researchers discussed in this article. Do you agree or disagree? Explain your position.

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Google Maps sails down the Colorado River (pictures) - CNET

Google Maps sails down the Colorado River (pictures) - CNET | EGHS Geography | Scoop.it
Google Maps sails down the Colorado River (pictures)
CNET
Google loaded its Street View trekker onto a raft and set sail down the country's most endangered river: the Colorado River.

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Interactive map: Prevalence of baby names in the USA

Interactive map: Prevalence of baby names in the USA | EGHS Geography | Scoop.it

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Map of each state's favorite music artist(s)

Map of each state's favorite music artist(s) | EGHS Geography | Scoop.it
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Made In The USA: Childless Chinese Turn To American Surrogates

Made In The USA: Childless Chinese Turn To American Surrogates | EGHS Geography | Scoop.it
Growing numbers of Chinese have hired American surrogates, allowing a couple to get around China's ban on the procedure and its birth limits. It also guarantees a coveted U.S. passport.
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Urban Risk Assessments: Understanding Disaster and Climate Risk in Cities

Urban Risk Assessments: Understanding Disaster and Climate Risk in Cities | EGHS Geography | Scoop.it
The Urban Risk Assessment presents a flexible approach that project and city managers can use to identify feasible measures to assess a city’s risk to natural disasters and climate change.
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Composite Then and Now Photos of the 1906 San Francisco Earthquake

Composite Then and Now Photos of the 1906 San Francisco Earthquake | EGHS Geography | Scoop.it

Since 2010, San Francisco photographer Shawn Clover has been working on a striking series of then and now composite photos of the 1906 San Francisco earthquake. . . .

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Why It's a Big Deal That Half of the Great Lakes Are Still Covered in Ice

Why It's a Big Deal That Half of the Great Lakes Are Still Covered in Ice | EGHS Geography | Scoop.it
What happens when it all melts? Read on.
Heather Ramsey's insight:

For students: Read the article closely, then DISCUSS the potential economic and environmental impacts of the issue discussed in the article. Take care to put together a thorough and thoughtful answer.

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Can You Identify These Cities From Their Light Signatures?

Can You Identify These Cities From Their Light Signatures? | EGHS Geography | Scoop.it

"The light that a city emits is like its glowing fingerprint. From the orderly grid of Manhattan, to the sprawling, snaking streets of Milan, to the bright contrast of Kuwait’s ring-roads, each city leaves its own pattern of tiny glowing dots. See if you can ID these cities based on the way they shine."


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 12, 6:59 PM

This short quiz of 16 cities combines several analytic components of geography that you won't see in more standard map quizzes for regional geography;  this draws on some similar skills similar to the map quiz that was based on identifying the city based on Starbucks locations.  Some recognition of local spatial patterns from previous map analysis can make this quiz easier but there are still some cities that you haven't ever looked at from space before.  Things to consider as you attempt this quiz:  Which of the four possible selections can you rule out out?  What enabled you to eliminate those selections (e.g.-coastal, scale, size, grid pattern, transportation systems, density, etc.)?  What does to layout of the city tell us about the planning and historical origins of the city?  Is there one urban model that best helps us explain the configuration of this city?     


Tags: urbanmodels, planning, density, urbanism, unit 7 citiestrivia.

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, April 14, 8:00 AM

Geography education

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15 Famous Landmarks Zoomed Out To Show Their Surroundings

15 Famous Landmarks Zoomed Out To Show Their Surroundings | EGHS Geography | Scoop.it

This collection of photographs of majestic landmarks around the world do a great job of just how important framing, perspective and lighting are to a photograph. All of these photo pairs are of the same object, but the changes in perspective can make them seem more or less grand.

Aside from the composition of these images, some of them also show just how misleading photography can be. Most of us probably imagine that the Taj Mahal is surrounded by pristine gardens because it’s always photographed from the same angle. But the squalid garbage dumps behind it tell another tale. Of course, not all of these photos reduce the landmarks’ grandeur. The Acropolis, the Arc de Triomphe and New York City’s Central Park all arguably look even better or at least look great in a different way in their second photos. The zoomed-out photos of the Acropolis and the Arc only serve to highlight how those landmarks are focal points of their cities.


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Generation Missing out on School in Wartime Syria

Generation Missing out on School in Wartime Syria | EGHS Geography | Scoop.it
Along with some 20 other Syrian children, 13-year-old Anas braves rain, mud and cold to attend class in a tent pitched along Lebanon's border with Syria, the home of a Syrian refugee family that serves as a classroom for four hours each day. There are no benches and no blackboard. There are...
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Population rising faster in South and West, census data show

Population rising faster in South and West, census data show | EGHS Geography | Scoop.it

WASHINGTON - Population growth in Southern and Western states, led by Texas, California and Florida, accounted for more than 80% of new residents nationwide over the last three years,...

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Get ready to feel pinched by supermarket prices

Get ready to feel pinched by supermarket prices | EGHS Geography | Scoop.it
Milk, meat and vegetables are all getting more expensive, a trend that’s not going to reverse any time soon

Via Mike Busarello's Digital Textbooks
Heather Ramsey's insight:
For students: Make a prediction about how consumers will react to higher prices at the supermarket. (Think beyond how this will affect consumer's attitudes about the prices...) DISCUSS some additional impacts of rising food prices.
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California farmers: How the state feeds a nation

California farmers: How the state feeds a nation | EGHS Geography | Scoop.it
You know how the rest of the country likes to make fun of California, but how much would they miss us if we were gone? You can certainly bet the weeping and wailing would be off the charts at dinner time.
Heather Ramsey's insight:

This is a humorous look at California's invaluable contribution to our country's food supply.

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World's Most Dangerous Job - Human Planet - BBC - YouTube

“ On the Indonesian island of Java, men mine sulphur from inside Ljen Volcano. It's crater is filled with a mix of highly toxic gases, that have claimed the li...”


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Young Coloradans fueling drop in driving, study finds

Young Coloradans fueling drop in driving, study finds | EGHS Geography | Scoop.it
The Colorado Public Research Interest Group analyzed federal highway data to conclude Coloradans are driving about 11 percent per person less than a decade ago.
Heather Ramsey's insight:

For students:

Where do you fit into COPIRG's study? How do you get around? Do you use public transit by choice or out of necessity? If you had a choice, would you want to pay for a car and all the things that go with having one, or would you continue to walk/bike/take the bus?

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This Map Shows How To Get Anywhere You Want In America Without Taking A Plane

This Map Shows How To Get Anywhere You Want In America Without Taking A Plane | EGHS Geography | Scoop.it
Here's how you could hack together a national transportation network. Hope you brought a good book.

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Marianne Riddile's curator insight, March 11, 6:09 AM

Interesting.  These bus routes might work for motorhomes too!