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Education Is Harmful When You Measure the Wrong Things - Huffington Post

Education Is Harmful When You Measure the Wrong Things - Huffington Post | EFL Teaching Journal | Scoop.it
"Measure the wrong things and you'll get the wrong behaviors." This simple statement succinctly characterizes why the American education system continues beating its head against the wall.

 

Throughout education, an increasingly rigid, closed loop of assessment is systematically making schools worse: Define things children should know or be able to do at a certain age; design a curriculum to instruct them in what you've decided they should know; set benchmarks; develop tests to see if they have learned what you initially defined; rinse and repeat.

This narrow, mechanistic approach to education does not correspond to the reality of child development and brain science, but the metrics and assessment train charges down the track nevertheless.

 

So what's wrong with that, you might ask? Isn't school about teaching kids stuff and then testing them to see what they've learned? In a word, "No." It simply doesn't work, especially with young children.

As Boston College Professor Peter Gray wrote in a recent Psychology Today article:

Perhaps more tragic than the lack of long-term academic advantage of early academic instruction is evidence that such instruction can produce long-term harm, especially in the realms of social and emotional development.

  

"Direct instruction" does increase scores on the tests the instruction is aimed toward, even with very young children. This self-fulfilling prophecy is not surprising. But multiple studies also show that the gains in performance are fleeting -- they completely wash out after 1-3 years when compared to children who had no such early direct instruction.


Via Mark E. Deschaine, PhD, Gust MEES
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Gust MEES's curator insight, May 16, 2015 11:50 AM
Measure the wrong things and you'll get the wrong behaviors." This simple statement succinctly characterizes why the American education system continues beating its head against the wall.


Throughout education, an increasingly rigid, closed loop of assessment is systematically making schools worse: Define things children should know or be able to do at a certain age; design a curriculum to instruct them in what you've decided they should know; set benchmarks; develop tests to see if they have learned what you initially defined; rinse and repeat.

This narrow, mechanistic approach to education does not correspond to the reality of child development and brain science, but the metrics and assessment train charges down the track nevertheless.


So what's wrong with that, you might ask? Isn't school about teaching kids stuff and then testing them to see what they've learned? In a word, "No." It simply doesn't work, especially with young children.

As Boston College Professor Peter Gray wrote in a recent Psychology Today article:

Perhaps more tragic than the lack of long-term academic advantage of early academic instruction is evidence that such instruction can produce long-term harm, especially in the realms of social and emotional development.


Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, May 18, 2015 10:09 PM

Teaching and education are relational, thus hard to define and hard to measure. Perhaps, Paul Ricoueur's ideas about narrative work better where we use metaphors, myth, and poetic language.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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11 free tools for discovering research | Mendeley Blog

11 free tools for discovering research | Mendeley Blog | EFL Teaching Journal | Scoop.it
Finding research is often frustrating. You're always running into paywalls and the interfaces to most library databases look like they were designed sometime back in 1980.

Via Dennis T OConnor
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Rescooped by Lyudmila Anikina from Edumathingy
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The 6 Best Online Bibliography Tools

The 6 Best Online Bibliography Tools | EFL Teaching Journal | Scoop.it

If helping your students write papers is a part of your school day, you probably already know that there are enough issues to focus on without having to spend a lot of time teaching your students how to build a bibliography and correctly cite their sources. Your time is likely better spent helping create a focused, concise piece of work that uses excellent grammar and sentence structure.


Via Dennis T OConnor, Louise Robinson-Lay
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