EFL Teaching Journal
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Rescooped by Lyudmila Anikina from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
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Highly trained, respected and free: why Finland's teachers are different

Highly trained, respected and free: why Finland's teachers are different | EFL Teaching Journal | Scoop.it
Welcome to a country where teaching is a highly prized profession. Finland’s teachers have kept the nation near the top of the influential Pisa performance rankings since they were first published in 2001, leading to an influx of educational tourists as other teachers have endeavoured to learn from the Finnish experience.

 

The high-level training is the basis for giving young teachers a great deal of autonomy to choose what methods they use in the classroom – in contrast to England, Krokfors says, where she feels teaching is “somewhere between administration and giving tests to students”. In Finland, teachers are largely free from external requirements such as inspection, standardised testing and government control; school inspections were scrapped in the 1990s.

 

“Teachers need to have this high-quality education so they really do know how to use the freedom they are given, and learn to solve problems in a research-based way,” Krokfors says. “The most important thing we teach them is to take pedagogical decisions and judgments for themselves.”

 

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Finland

 

 
Via Gust MEES
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Kati Pärkkä's curator insight, June 25, 2015 1:39 AM

Teachers' basic training is very qualified. To make sure that the quality of teaching stays on high level we should invest on in-service training of all teachers. The world and society is developing faster and faster every day...

Iva Golec's curator insight, August 3, 2015 9:43 AM
Welcome to a country where teaching is a highly prized profession. Finland’s teachers have kept the nation near the top of the influential Pisa performance rankings since they were first published in 2001, leading to an influx of educational tourists as other teachers have endeavoured to learn from the Finnish experience.

 

The high-level training is the basis for giving young teachers a great deal of autonomy to choose what methods they use in the classroom – in contrast to England, Krokfors says, where she feels teaching is “somewhere between administration and giving tests to students”. In Finland, teachers are largely free from external requirements such as inspection, standardised testing and government control; school inspections were scrapped in the 1990s.

 

“Teachers need to have this high-quality education so they really do know how to use the freedom they are given, and learn to solve problems in a research-based way,” Krokfors says. “The most important thing we teach them is to take pedagogical decisions and judgments for themselves.”

 

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Finland

 

Boutara Nour Eddine's curator insight, August 10, 2015 12:55 PM
Welcome to a country where teaching is a highly prized profession. Finland’s teachers have kept the nation near the top of the influential Pisa performance rankings since they were first published in 2001, leading to an influx of educational tourists as other teachers have endeavoured to learn from the Finnish experience.

 

The high-level training is the basis for giving young teachers a great deal of autonomy to choose what methods they use in the classroom – in contrast to England, Krokfors says, where she feels teaching is “somewhere between administration and giving tests to students”. In Finland, teachers are largely free from external requirements such as inspection, standardised testing and government control; school inspections were scrapped in the 1990s.

 

“Teachers need to have this high-quality education so they really do know how to use the freedom they are given, and learn to solve problems in a research-based way,” Krokfors says. “The most important thing we teach them is to take pedagogical decisions and judgments for themselves.”

 

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Finland

 

Rescooped by Lyudmila Anikina from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
Scoop.it!

Innovation and risk: Putting an end to the fear of failure

Innovation and risk: Putting an end to the fear of failure | EFL Teaching Journal | Scoop.it
In Silicon Valley, technology entrepreneurs who fail often start over and create successful companies on the second or third try. Failure is seen as a...

 

The most important skills set for the 21st century is creative problem-solving and critical thinking. Our world is changing fast and the traditional career paths of the 20th Century no longer guarantee lifetime employment or security. Entrepreneurs develop resilience to adapt to changing conditions. And the development of the Internet offers a new generation of graduates the unparalleled possibility of founding a new company with a low capital investment – creating the fabric of tomorrow’s economy.

 

 That will only happen in Europe if our society embraces well-reasoned risk-taking, failure and entrepreneurship. To start down that path, we need to free a new generation of students from the notion that they should follow the dictates of their parents’ generation, for whom success meant working for a large company or in government. The company man and the bureaucrat are yesterday’s heros. Tomorrow’s are the inventors, innovators and entrepreneurs. It is those individuals who can carry the European economy out of its current crisis and into a brighter future.

 


Via Gust MEES
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Gust MEES's curator insight, April 13, 2013 9:33 AM

 

The most important skills set for the 21st century is creative problem-solving and critical thinking. Our world is changing fast and the traditional career paths of the 20th Century no longer guarantee lifetime employment or security. Entrepreneurs develop resilience to adapt to changing conditions. And the development of the Internet offers a new generation of graduates the unparalleled possibility of founding a new company with a low capital investment – creating the fabric of tomorrow’s economy.

 

 That will only happen in Europe if our society embraces well-reasoned risk-taking, failure and entrepreneurship. To start down that path, we need to free a new generation of students from the notion that they should follow the dictates of their parents’ generation, for whom success meant working for a large company or in government. The company man and the bureaucrat are yesterday’s heros. Tomorrow’s are the inventors, innovators and entrepreneurs. It is those individuals who can carry the European economy out of its current crisis and into a brighter future.