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Get A Harvard Education on Your iPad | PadGadget

Get A Harvard Education on Your iPad | PadGadget | efficient gardening | Scoop.it
If you’ve been reading much tech news within the past year, you probably already know that Harvard, MIT, UC Berkley, and others have begun offering free online courses to anyone willing to enroll.
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Rescooped by Laura Stevenson-Wood from Conservation agriculture
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Smart, Innovative Farmers in the Dakotas

Smart, Innovative Farmers in the Dakotas | efficient gardening | Scoop.it
Smart, Innovative Farmers in the Dakotas Big Picture Agriculture By combining multi-species cover crops, mob grazing, and frequent rotations with conservation tillage, they are investing in their soil and the future, and are being rewarded with...

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vertical urban farm in san diego by brandon martella

vertical urban farm in san diego by brandon martella | efficient gardening | Scoop.it
a new high-rise building typology integrates an expansive farm and market into the american urban landscape in response to population growth and unsustainable food consumption.

Via Alan Yoshioka
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Rescooped by Laura Stevenson-Wood from Sustain Our Earth
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Bioclimatic House in the Canary Islands, Spain

Bioclimatic House in the Canary Islands, Spain | efficient gardening | Scoop.it

This bioclimatic house, by Estudio José Luis Rodríguez, is a self-sufficient structure integrated into the terrain of the Canary Islands, a landscape characterized by a continuous terracing of the extreme topography.

 

In response to this site, the design features a basalt stone wall that supports a light structure of plywood, galvanized steel walls and glass.

The building's orientation is determined by solar radiation; photovoltaic panels produce electricity, in order to achieve zero carbon emissions. The living area is connected to the outside with a space that is protected from sun and wind, while a wall located in the sleeping area to the north has a high thermal mass for passive temperature control.

The design also aims to reduce its ecological footprint on the use of materials and construction systems by using local materials (basalt wall insulation covered with volcanic lapilli, for example), environmentally certified materials and no harmful elements, such as VOC compounds in synthetic paints and varnishes.

 

View more images of this unique, contextural and contemporary green project at the link to ArchDaily's feature...


Via Lauren Moss, Susan Davis Cushing, SustainOurEarth
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What the study forgot to mention: Organic food can save the world from devastating climate change

What the study forgot to mention: Organic food can save the world from devastating climate change | efficient gardening | Scoop.it
In the wake of the release of the infamous "Stanford study," which claims there is no substantial difference between organic food and conventional food, many with a deeper understanding of how organic food production works are speaking out against...
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Urban farming, food security - Kuwait Times

Urban farming, food security - Kuwait Times | efficient gardening | Scoop.it
Kuwait TimesUrban farming, food securityKuwait TimesIt is no secret that Kuwait has very little arable lands, let alone sufficient natural fresh water to develop farming at commercial levels.

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The 40 Year Lightbulb: Firefly LED Lights Cut Energy Costs 90%

The 40 Year Lightbulb: Firefly LED Lights Cut Energy Costs 90% | efficient gardening | Scoop.it

 a better light to read your gardening books by

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Rescooped by Laura Stevenson-Wood from Aquaponics in Action
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Wind-Powered Aquaponic Dome Greenhouse

Wind-Powered Aquaponic Dome Greenhouse | efficient gardening | Scoop.it

Aquaponics does not need to be a stand-alone system, and so it is great to see it integrated with many other types of systems and technologies.  Aquaponics needs a constant source of power, and so pairing it with solar, wind, or any other sustainable energy source is a great idea.  This project, a huge Wind-Powered Aquaponic Dome Greenhouse for Vermont could be very interesting indeed.


Via Japan Aquaponics
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Rescooped by Laura Stevenson-Wood from Tracking the Future
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The Extremely Personal Computer: The Digital Future of Mental Health

The Extremely Personal Computer: The Digital Future of Mental Health | efficient gardening | Scoop.it

It's 2018, and you're not feeling your best. Yesterday, on the phone with Comcast, you forgot your social security number, and had to call your mom to get it. She grew concerned. Your nightstand is full of half-finished novels, because it's easier to start fresh than to keep track of where you left off. And the fatigue -- last Thursday, you slept clear through your alarm, until Agnes in 8J pounded on your ceiling with a basketball. You've been here before; you know you're depressed. And you know what you have to do.

You fire up your PC and dig out your biomonitor wrist strap. "Welcome back, kiddo," Regina, your therapist avatar, greets you. Regina has shiny red hair and glasses, and the Australian accent of a Bond girl. "Let's catch up."


Via Szabolcs Kósa
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Urban beekeeping keeps cities healthy | SmartPlanet

Urban beekeeping keeps cities healthy | SmartPlanet | efficient gardening | Scoop.it
Researcher Noah Wilson-Rich draws attention to the striking correlations between the survival of honey bees and the future health of cities.
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Q&A: The self-experimenter who intends to change medicine | SmartPlanet

Q&A: The self-experimenter who intends to change medicine | SmartPlanet | efficient gardening | Scoop.it
SmartPlanet speaks with Larry Smarr who has embarked on a computer-aided study of his own body, which may lead to profound changes in the way we pract...
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Backyard chickens would be step toward better self-sufficiency - McCook Daily Gazette

Backyard chickens would be step toward better self-sufficiencyMcCook Daily GazetteWhile most of us are harvesting fall household crops and thinking about cleaning up the garden for the year, "urban agriculture" proponents in one Nebraska town have...

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Japanese Scientists Developing Sugar Batteries That Store 20% More Energy Than Lithium Ion Cells

Japanese Scientists Developing Sugar Batteries That Store 20% More Energy Than Lithium Ion Cells | efficient gardening | Scoop.it
Researchers at the Tokyo University of Science have developed a way to make batteries using sugar.
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Indian Red Rice Revival Relies on Organic Farmers | Navara | Kerala | Ammini Ramachandran

Indian Red Rice Revival Relies on Organic Farmers | Navara | Kerala | Ammini Ramachandran | efficient gardening | Scoop.it
Increasingly rare Indian red rice known as navara is making a comeback in Kerala, India, thanks to the preservation efforts of organic farmers there.

 

When the mild winter arrives in south India around December or January, cool winds and pleasant temperatures replace the remnants of lashing rains from the northeastern monsoons. In the mountainous regions of central Kerala, the chill in the air signals the planting of medicinal Indian red rice, navara, a crop cultivated only once a year, usually between February and April. Navara, with its red bran layer is characteristic to Kerala.

Ayurveda, the traditional Indian medical system, calls it shastika rice and claims that it can restore imbalances in the human body. Navara rice is rich in antioxidants and polyphenols and has two or three times as much zinc and iron as white rice. It has the rare capability to enrich, strengthen, regenerate and energize the body. It is also used as baby food and replaces white rice on traditional days of partial fasting in many parts of India.

The red color, varying from light to dark red, is confined to the bran layer, but a touch of red remains on the grains even after milling. Navara grows fast compared to other varieties of rice; it takes around 60 to 72 days from planting to harvest, depending on the area of cultivation of and weather conditions. Navara rice is also resistant to insects and pests and can be stored for long time.

Bringing back a rare Indian red rice variety

Despite its medicinal properties, the cultivation of this rice variety is quite limited. Pure seeds have become difficult to find due to cross-pollination. Cultivating and preserving the seeds for this unusual variety is difficult.

Navara is a low-yield variety not well suited for commercial cultivation. The introduction of other, high-yielding varieties of rice in the 1960s and 1970s and the genetically modified varieties of the 1990s also adversely affected the cultivation of navara. Navara Eco Farm, a family owned farm in Chittur, Kerala, is pioneering the efforts to preserve navara rice. P. Narayanan Unny, the third-generation owner who took over the farm in 1995, has taken bold initiatives in his conservation efforts.

Unny decided to implement organic farming methods to preserve the crop’s medicinal properties. Converting to an organic methods was a challenge. After years of effort, he collected a sufficient quantity of navara seeds and gradually began cultivating only navara rice. Farm workers were taught organic farming skills, and the farm is mentoring neighboring farming communities and educating them the fundamentals of organic farming.

The cultivation of navara is a meditative process, passed down through generations. The rice fields are plowed, and farm workers sow the seeds and wait for a few days to replant the tender new shoots. Rice is traditionally farmed by hand; under cloudy or clear skies, men and women stoop in the deep mud and plant the rice, stalk by stalk. Soon the farm land is dotted with bright green bristles. Weeks later, the land is draped in vivid emerald, speckled with pools of reflective water. Slowly, the tall sheaves ripen, hanging in golden bunches.

When the leaves of the rice stalk start turning yellow, it is time for the harvest. Stalks are cut with iron sickles and tied in bundles to dry in farmyards and on roadsides. The whole farm becomes a large drying area. The languid air becomes heavy with dust and there is the constant sound of threshing as the grains are separated from the dried stacks. After threshing, the rice is ready for milling.

Historically the bran was removed from the grains by hand as people pounded them in ural (a stone or wooden trough) with ulakka (a long wooden or sometimes iron pole with a metal bottom). Two women would each pick up an ulakka, and together they would pulverize the grains. When one pole went in, other went up in the air; the two of them work in a synchronized motion. Now this laborious and time-consuming step is replaced by a special milling process that removes the hull without losing most of the bran.

Introducing organics

Unny’s long-term plan focused on organic farming methods, biodiversity and conservation. In 2006 the farm and its products were certified organic by the National Project on Organic Production, European Union and U.S. Department of Agriculture.

He formed two associations of navara and palakkadan matta farmers and applied for geographical indication certification. In 2007, these two rice varieties were the first agricultural products in India to be registered with a geographical indication. India’s agriculture ministry honored Unny with the Plant Genome Savior Community Recognition Award for his conservation efforts.


Via Giri Kumar
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Rescooped by Laura Stevenson-Wood from Aquaponics World View
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The Farming Technique That Could Revolutionize the Way We Eat

The Farming Technique That Could Revolutionize the Way We Eat | efficient gardening | Scoop.it

Aquaponics uses fish to create soil-less farms that can fit into cities much easier.


Via Jim Hall
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Rescooped by Laura Stevenson-Wood from Sustain Our Earth
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The Agrovoltaic system

The Agrovoltaic system | efficient gardening | Scoop.it

The entire structure fully integrates with the surrounding landscape and the visual impact on the agriculture environment is almost null, thanks to both the “structural lightness” and the reduced size of panels, which makes them similar to the foliage of a very rarefied  pergola. For these reasons, all the plants were excluded from the Environmental Impact Assessment


Via Roberto Bogge, Ian Lin, SustainOurEarth
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Rescooped by Laura Stevenson-Wood from resilience through self-reliance
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DIY 1000 watt wind turbine

"We built a 1000 watt wind turbine to help charge the battery bank that powers our offgrid home. It's a permanent magnet alternator, generating 3 phase ac, rectified to dc, and fed to a charge controller. The magnets spin with the wind, the coils are fixed, so no brushes or slip rings necessary."


Via Vivalist
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The Global Food Waste Scandal

TED Talks Western countries throw out nearly half of their food, not because it’s inedible -- but because it doesn’t look appealing. Tristram Stuart delves into the shocking data of wasted food, calling for a more responsible use of global resources.

 

No one should be surprised that more developed societies are more wasteful societies.  It is not just personal wasting of food at the house and restaurants that are the problem.  Perfectly edible food is thrown out due to size (smaller than standards but perfectly normal), cosmetics (Bananas that are shaped 'funny') and costumer preference (discarded bread crust).  This is an intriguing perpective on our consumptive culture, but it also is helpful in framing issues such as sustainability and human and environmental interactions in a technologically advanced societies that are often removed form the land where the food they eat originates. 

 

Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, TED, video, unit 5 agriculture.


Via Seth Dixon
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Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 29, 2013 6:13 PM

Ted explains it well how we all waste perfectly good food that people would like to eat. Also it was amazing how much food was in the dumpsters that was just a day or week old. That meat could feed hundreds of people that are struggling to eat and all that meet to waste. 

megan b clement's curator insight, December 16, 2013 1:51 AM

Ted talks about just how wasteful our planet is. How we just ignore the issue and act like it will  not affect us in the future. When he shows you video and pictures of massive piles of the ends of a loaf of bread or all the food that Stop and Shop throws out because it does not "look" good for the customer. How every little bit of help counts you can try to make a little bit of an effort to be less wasteful. We have so much unnecessary waste. Like when he uses the example of how many people throw away the ends of a loaf of bread then he shows the waste of the ends of bread in massive piles it makes you sick. Especially with all of the hungry people in the world we need to be more resourceful.

 

 

Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 21, 2:13 PM

No one should be surprised that more developed societies are more wasteful societies.  It is not just personal wasting of food at the house and restaurants that are the problem.  Perfectly edible food is thrown out due to size (smaller than standards but perfectly normal), cosmetics (Bananas that are shaped 'funny') and costumer preference (discarded bread crust).  This is an intriguing perceptive on our consumptive culture, but it also is helpful in framing issues such as sustainability and human and environmental interactions in a technologically advanced societies that are often removed form the land where the food they eat originates. 


Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, TED, video, unit 5 agriculture.

Rescooped by Laura Stevenson-Wood from Sustainable Technologies
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'Frozen air' could heat up renewable energy

'Frozen air' could heat up renewable energy | efficient gardening | Scoop.it
The journey to a cooler, greener planet may start with a breath of fresh air, suggests a battery technology under development that could rap...

Via Kalani Kirk Hausman
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plant based fish food

plant based fish food | efficient gardening | Scoop.it
Article about researchers substituting traditional fish food with Soy and protein supplements...
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Rescooped by Laura Stevenson-Wood from @FoodMeditations Time
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Planting rebellion: How to reclaim our seed culture

Planting rebellion: How to reclaim our seed culture | efficient gardening | Scoop.it
Photo by Edible Office. “In the course of getting a plate of food to our table, we’re paying a lot of attention to the farmer, the chef, the farmers market — all of that is as it should be, but we pay very little attention to the thing that starts...

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Rescooped by Laura Stevenson-Wood from Tracking the Future
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Ray Kurzweil at DEMOfall 2012

Well-known author, entrepreneur and futurist Ray Kurzweil talks about mapping the human brain, the continuing evolution of technology and continued rise of artificial intelligence from the DEMOfall 2012 show in Santa Clara, Calif.


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Next-gen toilets that could change the world | SmartPlanet

Next-gen toilets that could change the world | SmartPlanet | efficient gardening | Scoop.it
These innovative off-the-grid toilets take human waste and turn it into something more valuable, including hydrogen, electricity and even, clean water...
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Breakthrough: World’s most efficient solar panel | SmartPlanet

Breakthrough: World’s most efficient solar panel | SmartPlanet | efficient gardening | Scoop.it
N. Carolina’s Semprius and its German backer Siemens develop a prototype that converts more than a third of sunlight into electricity.

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Homemade Fresh Tomato Ketchup Recipe With Coconut Oil

Homemade Fresh Tomato Ketchup Recipe With Coconut Oil | efficient gardening | Scoop.it
Do you have a plethora of tomatoes this time of year? Why not try making your own homemade fresh tomato ketchup (with coconut oil)! Get the recipe below.

Via Dave Gatenby
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Honeycomb-Shaped ‘Beehive’ Solar Panels Could Energize Building Facades

Honeycomb-Shaped ‘Beehive’ Solar Panels Could Energize Building Facades | efficient gardening | Scoop.it

Inspired by the complex structure of honeycomb, an startup called SolarOr has developed a clear solar panel that can act as windows in new buildings.  

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