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Growing the Wealth

Growing the Wealth | Inequality, Poverty, and Corruption: Effects and Solutions | Scoop.it
Inclusive capitalism, when implemented correctly, can begin to address some of the fundamental problems with our economy while simultaneously improving workers’ well-being and the performance of businesses.
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Inequality, Poverty, and Corruption: Effects and Solutions
With growing gaps between rich and poor, social scientists are researching the effects on the health of a society.
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Chobani CEO To Donate At Least Half Of Wealth To Help Refugees

NEW YORK (AP) — Chobani founder and CEO Hamdi Ulukaya says he will join some of the world's richest individuals in pledging to give away at least half his wealth, which has been estimated at $1.41 billion.

The Turkish-born yogurt entrepreneur is making the commitment as part of The Giving Pledge, which was created by Berkshire Hathaway CEO Warren Buffett and Microsoft founder Bill Gates. The effort asks billionaires to commit to giving away more than half their wealth during their lifetimes or in their wills.

The group notes the pledge is a "moral commitment," rather than a legal contract. It says that by asking people to make public pledges, it hopes to generate conversations about philanthropy.

In an interview with The Associated Press, Ulukaya said he plans to devote his philanthropic efforts to helping refugees around the world. He said he has set up a website for a foundation, called Tent, which he plans to fund over time. He said Tent's activities will include raising awareness about refugee situations and helping provide relief on issues like education and health care.

The 43-year-old Ulukaya had already pledged last year to donate $2 million for refugees fleeing violence in his homeland, with initial donations being made to the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees. At the time, he said he wanted to bring attention to people caught up in fighting along the Iraq and Syria borders with Turkey, a region targeted by the militant Islamic State group.
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REPORT: Child Homelessness Surges To All-Time High

REPORT: Child Homelessness Surges To All-Time High | Inequality, Poverty, and Corruption: Effects and Solutions | Scoop.it
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — The number of homeless children in the U.S. has surged in recent years to an all-time high, amounting to one child in every 30, according to a comprehensive state-by-state report that blames the nation's high poverty rate, the lack of affordable housing and the impacts of pervasive domestic violence.

Titled "America's Youngest Outcasts," the report being issued Monday by the National Center on Family Homelessness calculates that nearly 2.5 million American children were homeless at some point in 2013. The number is based on the Department of Education's latest count of 1.3 million homeless children in public schools, supplemented by estimates of homeless pre-school children not counted by the DOE.

The problem is particularly severe in California, which has one-eighth of the U.S. population but accounts for more than one-fifth of the homeless children with a tally of nearly 527,000.

Carmela DeCandia, director of the national center and a co-author of the report, noted that the federal government has made progress in reducing homelessness among veterans and chronically homeless adults.
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Ebola teaches tough lessons about rapid research

Ebola teaches tough lessons about rapid research | Inequality, Poverty, and Corruption: Effects and Solutions | Scoop.it
Public-health officials make plans for how to speed up responses to tropical-disease outbreaks.

 

It was only in March — a full year after the Ebola outbreak was first reported — that large-scale tests of candidate vaccines got under way. Some of those trials have little chance of being completed because cases are now too rare: the US National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, which is testing a preventive vaccine, estimates that it would need to enrol more than 150,000 people in Guinea to show that its vaccine works.


Although trials of Ebola drugs and vaccines were set up at a breakneck pace compared with the years it normally takes to organize large clinical trials, the researchers behind them have been frustrated by delays. “We have said that we need to conduct trials in this outbreak, and we’ve largely failed, and that’s desperately disappointing,” says Trudie Lang, a global-health researcher at the University of Oxford, UK, who has been involved with clinical trials of Ebola treatments.

 

Similar concerns arose during the severe acute respiratory syndrome outbreak of 2003–04 and the 2009 H1N1 flu pandemic; after both events, researchers drafted study designs that could speed up future trials in outbreaks caused by respiratory pathogens. But there has not been a similar effort to coordinate trials for haemorrhagic diseases such as Ebola, which are less likely to spread to wealthy nations.



Via Krishan Maggon
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Krishan Maggon 's curator insight, Today, 12:27 AM

Nature 521, 405–406 (28 May 2015) doi:10.1038/521405a

 

Ebola teaches tough lessons about rapid researchErika Check Hayden
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Hold Bankers Accountable for Their Crimes

Hold Bankers Accountable for Their Crimes | Inequality, Poverty, and Corruption: Effects and Solutions | Scoop.it
Last week, Attorney General Loretta E. Lynch announced that five major banks were pleading guilty to criminal charges for what she described as a “brazen display of collusion” to manipulate the currency markets. The banks — Citigroup, JPMorgan Chase, UBS, Barclays and Royal Bank of Scotland Group — were hit with $5.6 billion in fines and penalties.

Sensibly, the banks were forced to plead guilty, not simply pay fines in settlements where they neither admitted nor denied the changes. But the charges still were brought against banks, not bankers. No banker was held accountable. The personal fortunes of the bankers who profited were not touched. Shareholders, not bankers, will pay the fines. The Justice Department would have us believe that criminal banks ran profitable criminal conspiracies without involving any bankers.
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'The Challenge of Journalism… Is to Survive in the Pressure Cooker of Plutocracy'

'The Challenge of Journalism… Is to Survive in the Pressure Cooker of Plutocracy' | Inequality, Poverty, and Corruption: Effects and Solutions | Scoop.it
The following remarks were made by Bill Moyers at the presentation of the Helen Bernstein Book Awards for Excellence in Journalism. The ceremony took place at the New York Public Library on May 26, 2015.

Thank you for allowing me to share this evening with you. I’m delighted to meet these exceptional journalists whose achievements you honor with the Helen Bernstein Book Award.

What happens to a society fed a diet of rushed, re-purposed, thinly reported “content?” Or “branded content” that is really merchandising — propaganda — posing as journalism?But I gulped when [New York Public Library President] Tony Marx asked me to talk about the challenges facing journalism today and gave me 10 to 15 minutes to do so. I seriously thought of taking a powder. Those challenges to journalism are so well identified, so mournfully lamented, and so passionately debated that I wonder if the subject isn’t exhausted. Or if we aren’t exhausted from hearing about it. I wouldn’t presume to speak for journalism or for other journalists or for any journalist except myself. Ted Gup, who teaches journalism at Emerson and Boston College, once bemoaned the tendency to lump all of us under the term “media.” As if everyone with a pen, a microphone, a camera (today, a laptop or smartphone) – or just a loud voice – were all one and the same. I consider myself a journalist. But so does James O’Keefe. Matt Drudge is not E.J. Dionne. The National Review is not The Guardian, or Reuters TheHuffington Post. Ann Coulter doesn’t speak for Katrina vanden Heuvel, or Rush Limbaugh for Ira Glass. Yet we are all “media” and as Ted Gup says, “the media” speaks for us all.
So I was just about to email Tony to say, “Sorry, you don’t want someone from the Jurassic era to talk about what’s happening to journalism in the digital era,” when I remembered one of my favorite stories about the late humorist Robert Benchley. He arrived for his final exam in international law at Harvard to find that the test consisted of one instruction: “Discuss the international fisheries problem in respect to hatcheries protocol and dragnet and procedure as it affects (a) the point of view of the United States and (b) the point of view of Great Britain.” Benchley was desperate but he was also honest, and he wrote: “I know nothing about the point of view of Great Britain in the arbitration of the international fisheries problem, and nothing about the point of view of the United States. I shall therefore discuss the question from the point of view of the fish.”

So shall I, briefly. One small fish in the vast ocean of media.

I look at your honorees this evening and realize they have already won one of the biggest prizes in journalism — support from venerable institutions: The New Yorker, The New York Times, NPR, The Wall Street Journal and The Christian Science Monitor. These esteemed news organizations paid — yes, you heard me, paid — them to report and to report painstakingly, intrepidly, often at great risk. Your honorees then took time — money buys time, perhaps its most valuable purchase — to craft the exquisite writing that transports us, their readers, to distant places – China, Afghanistan, the Great Barrier Reef, even that murky hotbed of conspiracy and secession known as Texas.

And after we read these stories, when we put down our Kindles and iPads, or — what’s that other device called? Oh yes – when we put down our books – we emerge with a different take on a slice of reality, a more precise insight into some of the forces changing our world.
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Full Planet, Empty Plates

Full Planet, Empty Plates | Inequality, Poverty, and Corruption: Effects and Solutions | Scoop.it

In this podcast from Carnegie Council, Lester R. Brown, president and founder of the Earth Policy Institute and founder and former president of Worldwatch Institute, reflects on the transition from an age of surpluses to an age of scarcity regarding the world's resources.


Via Flora Moon
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Key Sustainable Development Goals Ocean Health, Biodiversity

Key Sustainable Development Goals Ocean Health, Biodiversity | Inequality, Poverty, and Corruption: Effects and Solutions | Scoop.it
Wealth, gender inequality also key sustainable development goals facing societies worldwide, according to the UN Scientific Advisory Board.

Via Flora Moon
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Why a gender-sensitive approach is necessary in peacekeeping and security sector reform ( SSR) | European Year for Development

Why a gender-sensitive approach is necessary in peacekeeping and security sector reform ( SSR) | European Year for Development | Inequality, Poverty, and Corruption: Effects and Solutions | Scoop.it
There is still an urgent need to refocus attention on integrating gender perspectives and involving women in peacekeeping and SSR reform processes. This article considers some of the key reasons why this matters.

Via CoPeSeNetwork, Rob Duke
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Amazing Village Built Exclusively For People With Dementia

Amazing Village Built Exclusively For People With Dementia | Inequality, Poverty, and Corruption: Effects and Solutions | Scoop.it
Check out this amazing village built exclusively for people with dementia.

Via Rob Duke
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FIFA officials arrested on corruption charges, face U.S. extradition

FIFA officials arrested on corruption charges, face U.S. extradition | Inequality, Poverty, and Corruption: Effects and Solutions | Scoop.it
Swiss authorities are arresting several top FIFA officials on federal corruption charges in Zurich and plan to extradite them to the United States.

Via Rob Duke
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Rob Duke's curator insight, May 27, 1:34 PM

White Collar Crime or Real Politiks?

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Giant Solar Floating Farm Could Produce 8,000 Tons of Vegetables Annually

Giant Solar Floating Farm Could Produce 8,000 Tons of Vegetables Annually | Inequality, Poverty, and Corruption: Effects and Solutions | Scoop.it
Smart Floating Farms concept is a sustainable, solar-powered vertical farm that floats on pontoons, making it possible to grow food off a coast, in the open

   


Via Marianne PokeBunny Lenaerts
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America Will Die Old and Broke: The Systematic Right-Wing Plot to Ransack the Middle-Class

Through a quirk in state term limits combined with a terrible midterm election, the Nevada legislature has been taken over by amateurs and extremists. The legislature is now debating whether to dismantle the Nevada public employee pension system (PERS), a system that has gotten consistently high marks for transparency, responsibility and stewardship.

This attack on retirement benefits follows a very familiar pattern of fabricating data to destroy retirements that work and that people really like. It’s the same nonsense and lies used to destroy private pensions two decades ago, but this time it’s being done as part of a partisan wet dream of “limited government.” It’s a strategy as American as fast food and crumbling infrastructure.

This latest skirmish in the retirement wars perpetuates the biggest lie ever foisted on America—that we cannot afford retirement benefits.

Private pensions have indeed been systematically destroyed in recent decades, and replaced by “defined contribution” 401k plans. The conventional wisdom is that pensions are “too expensive,” but this is the heart of the lie. A great many private pensions were once over-funded, but a change in law allowed companies to “invest” the “excess” funding in other parts of their business. Once businessmen could legally raid the pension fund, the idea of private pensions was over. Many books have been written about the great pension theft. I recommend, for one, reading “Retirement Heist: How Companies Plunder and Profit from the Nest Eggs of American Workers.“ Spoiler alert: you will feel rage.

I’m no bystander in all this, because I’m a member of the Nevada pension system through my day job.  Even when I considered myself a Republican, I supported the pension system, just as my conservative friends and colleagues still do. But a lot has changed in a few years. Public pensions used to have bipartisan support, but the dysfunction and extremism that has turned Washington D.C .into a shit-show has spread to states like mine.

The attacks on benefits are always underhanded and dishonest, an effort to keep critics quiet, and this latest attempt is no exception, because it only targets future members of the pension system. It’s the same tactic used in the constant assault on Social Security — just take it from people who don’t have it yet. My favorite visual is the conservative who collects Social Security month after month (after month after month) then votes for politicians who will destroy those very modest benefits for his children — all while reciting the false narrative of “not saddling” those same children with debt.

A better idea (rather than stealing from our own children) would be to pay the reasonable levels of taxes necessary to fund the programs we all use. But “family values” conservatives are always delighted to burn the crops and salt the earth behind them, children be damned.
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Safe, affordable technology opens the way to automated transport

Safe, affordable technology opens the way to automated transport | Inequality, Poverty, and Corruption: Effects and Solutions | Scoop.it
Relying on top-notch, highly expensive vehicle parts to make automated transport a reality may provide sufficient guarantees for a large-scale deployment, but such an expensive setup might discourage investors.
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Transforming One Of LA's Most Notorious Neighborhoods, One Vacant Lot At A Time

Transforming One Of LA's Most Notorious Neighborhoods, One Vacant Lot At A Time | Inequality, Poverty, and Corruption: Effects and Solutions | Scoop.it
WATTS – For community stakeholders interested in transforming vacant lots, it may seem easier to clean up blighted areas than to change public opinion about the area of South Los Angeles widely known for its infamous riots. Yet, several community-based organizations are determined to do both.

Barbara J. Stanton grew up in a different kind of Watts, a place that had plenty of stores to shop along 103rd Street and a movie theatre before the riots or as locals call it -- Watts Rebellion -- broke out Aug. 11, 1965.
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The French Model: Will Climate Change Spark a World Wide Revolution? | Nomadic Politics

The French Model: Will Climate Change Spark a World Wide Revolution? | Nomadic Politics | Inequality, Poverty, and Corruption: Effects and Solutions | Scoop.it
Can we afford to ignore the growing impact of climate change on the stability of nations? Are we facing the potential of a global chaos that will make the French Revolution look like a playground squabble?
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California Set To Give Solar Panels To Low-Income Families For Free

California Set To Give Solar Panels To Low-Income Families For Free | Inequality, Poverty, and Corruption: Effects and Solutions | Scoop.it
California is the best state in the country if you want to go solar – but only if you’re rich enough. Due to the steep upfront costs of around $15,000, only those from middle- to upper-income families can afford to install solar arrays. A novel initiative is, however, looking to change that. This new project hopes to help disadvantaged communities see the sun in a different light.

Via Владимир Хлепитько
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Disgusted With Tory Government, Brits March in Force Against Austerity Madness

Disgusted With Tory Government, Brits March in Force Against Austerity Madness | Inequality, Poverty, and Corruption: Effects and Solutions | Scoop.it
Thousands are gathering in London on Wednesday, protesting the conservative Tory government's 'oppressive and draconian' austerity program.
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Smart Urban Villages: Efficient and sustainable community living

Smart Urban Villages: Efficient and sustainable community living | Inequality, Poverty, and Corruption: Effects and Solutions | Scoop.it
Smart Urban Villages is planning to create medium-density, sustainably designed housing communities with optional shared meals, mortgage-free long term leases and pools of shared vehicles to cut down on car ownership costs.

Via Flora Moon
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In Texas, the Race to Build in Harm's Way Outpaces Flood-Risk Studies and Warming Impacts

In Texas, the Race to Build in Harm's Way Outpaces Flood-Risk Studies and Warming Impacts | Inequality, Poverty, and Corruption: Effects and Solutions | Scoop.it
In Texas’s exurban counties, a population and building boom has outpaced efforts to cut flash-flood risks and dominates any impact so far from climate change.

Via Flora Moon
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Trade Is a Striking Example of the Political Power of the Affluent

Trade Is a Striking Example of the Political Power of the Affluent | Inequality, Poverty, and Corruption: Effects and Solutions | Scoop.it
The long-term trend toward reducing restrictions on trade reflects the preferences of the wealthy more than the poor or middle class.

Via Monica S Mcfeeters
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Joseph Stiglitz: ‘GDP per capita in the UK is lower than it was before the crisis. That is not a success’

Joseph Stiglitz: ‘GDP per capita in the UK is lower than it was before the crisis. That is not a success’ | Inequality, Poverty, and Corruption: Effects and Solutions | Scoop.it
Nobel prize-winner Joseph Stiglitz is the world’s foremost critic of economic and political inequality.

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Holdouts who REFUSE to sell their "nail houses" to developers

Holdouts who REFUSE to sell their "nail houses" to developers | Inequality, Poverty, and Corruption: Effects and Solutions | Scoop.it
Angry with Chinese homeowners who refuse to sell out, the country's eager and rapacious developers call their houses "stubborn nails" that can't be pounded into wood.

Via association concert urbain, Rob Duke
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Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from The FCPA News Wire
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Iraq - Parliamentary Office of Integrity investigating seven ministers for corruption

Iraq - Parliamentary Office of Integrity investigating seven ministers for corruption | Inequality, Poverty, and Corruption: Effects and Solutions | Scoop.it
Parliamentary Integrity: investigation with seven current ministers of corruption files [Baghdad-where] It revealed the Integrity Commission, the parliamentary investigation with seven ministers in the current government files of administrative...

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Bernie Sanders' Bold Idea to Make Wall Street Pay

Last week, Bernie Sanders, the Senator from Vermont and only announced challenger to Hillary Clinton for the Democratic nomination, took a strong stand for everyday people. He proposed a financial transactions tax (FTT), effectively a Wall Street sales tax, and to use the revenue to make public colleges tuition free.

While making college affordable to low and middle income families is important, the proposal for an FTT is a real game changer. There is no single policy that would have anywhere near as much impact in reforming the financial sector. A FTT would effectively impose a sales tax on stocks and other financial assets, so that speculators have to pay a tax on their trades, just like people who buy shoes or clothes.

There are three points people should understand about a FTT. The first is that it can raise an enormous amount of money. A FTT could be imposed at different rates. Sanders proposed following the rate structure in a bill put forward by Minneapolis Congressman Keith Ellison. Eleven countries in the European Union are working to implement a set of FTTs that would tax stock trades at a rate of 0.1 percent and trades of most derivative instruments at the rate of 0.01 percent.
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New Mathematics Could Neutralize Pathogens That Resist Antibiotics

New Mathematics Could Neutralize Pathogens That Resist Antibiotics | Inequality, Poverty, and Corruption: Effects and Solutions | Scoop.it
A “time machine” algorithm, backed by experimental data, reveals how to cycle drugs to reverse resistance
-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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