Microbes, plant immunity, and crop science
46.5K views | +0 today
Follow
 
Scooped by Nicolas Denancé
onto Microbes, plant immunity, and crop science
Scoop.it!

Cellular Microb. (2012): Consequences of flagellin export through the type III secretion system of Pseudomonas syringae reveal a major difference in the innate immune systems of mammals and the mod...

Cellular Microb. (2012): Consequences of flagellin export through the type III secretion system of Pseudomonas syringae reveal a major difference in the innate immune systems of mammals and the mod... | Microbes, plant immunity, and crop science | Scoop.it

Bacterial flagellin is perceived as a microbe (or pathogen)-associated molecular pattern (MAMP or PAMP) by the extracellular pattern recognition receptors, FLS2 and TLR5, of plants and mammals, respectively. Flagellin accidently translocated into mammalian cells by pathogen type III secretion systems (T3SSs) is recognized by nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat receptor NLRC4 as a pattern of pathogenesis and induces a death-associated immune response. The nonpathogen Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1, expressing a Pseudomonas syringae T3SS, and the plant pathogen P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000 were used to seek evidence of an analogous cytoplasmic recognition system for flagellin in the model plant Nicotiana benthamiana. Flagellin (FliC) was secreted in culture and translocated into plant cells by the T3SS expressed in Pf0-1 and DC3000 and in their ΔflgGHI flagellar pathway mutants. ΔfliC and ΔflgGHI mutants of Pf0-1 and DC3000 were strongly reduced in elicitation of reactive oxygen species production and in immunity induction as indicated by the ability of challenge bacteria inoculated 6 h later to translocate a type III effector-reporter and to elicit effector-triggered cell death. Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression in N. benthamiana of FliC with or without a eukaryotic export signal peptide, coupled with virus-induced gene silencing of FLS2, revealed no immune response that was not FLS2 dependent. Transiently expressed FliC from DC3000 and Pectobacterium carotovorum did not induce cell death in N. benthamiana, tobacco, or tomato leaves. Flagellin is the major Pseudomonas MAMP perceived by N. benthamiana, and although flagellin secretion through the plant cell wall by the T3SS may partially contribute to FLS2-dependent immunity, flagellin in the cytosol does not elicit immune-associated cell death. We postulate that a death response to translocated MAMPs would produce vulnerability to the many necrotrophic pathogens of plants, such as P. carotovorum, which differ from P. syringae and other (hemi)biotrophic pathogens in benefitting from death-associated immune responses.

 

Hai-Lei Wei, Suma Chakravarthy, Jay N. Worley, Alan Collmer

more...
No comment yet.
Microbes, plant immunity, and crop science
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Nicolas Denancé
Scoop.it!

Phytopathol.: Characterization of the Xanthomonas translucens Complex Using Draft Genomes, Comparative Genomics, Phylogenetic Analysis, and Diagnostic LAMP Assays

Prevalence of Xanthomonas translucens, which causes cereal leaf streak (CLS) in cereal crops and bacterial wilt in forage and turfgrass species, has increased in many regions in recent years. Because the pathogen is seedborne in economically important cereals, it is a concern for international and interstate germplasm exchange and, thus, reliable and robust protocols for its detection in seed are needed. However, historical confusion surrounding the taxonomy within the species has complicated the development of accurate and reliable diagnostic tools for X. translucens. Therefore, we sequenced genomes of 15 X. translucens strains representing six different pathovars and compared them with additional publicly available X. translucens genome sequences to obtain a genome-based phylogeny for robust classification of this species. Our results reveal three main clusters: one consisting of pv. cerealis, one consisting of pvs. undulosa and translucens, and a third consisting of pvs. arrhenatheri, graminis, phlei, and poae. Based on genomic differences, diagnostic loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) primers were developed that clearly distinguish strains that cause disease on cereals, such as pvs. undulosa, translucens, hordei, and secalis, from strains that cause disease on noncereal hosts, such as pvs. arrhenatheri, cerealis, graminis, phlei, and poae. Additional LAMP assays were developed that selectively amplify strains belonging to pvs. cerealis and poae, distinguishing them from other pathovars. These primers will be instrumental in diagnostics when implementing quarantine regulations to limit further geographic spread of X. translucens pathovars.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nicolas Denancé
Scoop.it!

MPMI: mlo-Based Resistance: An Apparently Universal “Weapon” to Defeat Powdery Mildew Disease (2017)

MPMI: mlo-Based Resistance: An Apparently Universal “Weapon” to Defeat Powdery Mildew Disease (2017) | Microbes, plant immunity, and crop science | Scoop.it
Loss-of-function mutations of one or more of the appropriate Mildew resistance locus o (Mlo) genes are an apparently reliable “weapon” to protect plants from infection by powdery mildew fungi, as they confer durable broad-spectrum resistance. Originally detected as a natural mutation in an Ethiopian barley landrace, this so-called mlo-based resistance has been successfully employed in European barley agriculture for nearly four decades. More recently, mlo-mediated resistance was discovered to be inducible in virtually every plant species of economic or scientific relevance. By now, mlo resistance has been found (as natural mutants) or generated (by induced mutagenesis, gene silencing, and targeted or nontargeted gene knock-out) in a broad range of monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous plant species. Here, we review features of mlo resistance in barley, discuss approaches to identify the appropriate Mlo gene targets to induce mlo-based resistance, and consider the issue of pleiotropic effects often associated with mlo-mediated immunity, which can harm plant yield and quality. We portray mlo-based resistance as an apparently universal and effective weapon to defeat powdery mildew disease in a multitude of plant species.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nicolas Denancé
Scoop.it!

Curr. Biol.: Activation of a Plant NLR Complex through Heteromeric Association with an Autoimmune Risk Variant of Another NLR (2017)

Curr. Biol.: Activation of a Plant NLR Complex through Heteromeric Association with an Autoimmune Risk Variant of Another NLR (2017) | Microbes, plant immunity, and crop science | Scoop.it
When independently evolved immune receptor variants meet in hybrid plants, they can activate immune signaling in the absence of non-self recognition. Such autoimmune risk alleles have recurrently evolved at the DANGEROUS MIX2 (DM2) nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat (NLR)-encoding locus in A. thaliana. One of these activates signaling in the presence of a particular variant encoded at another NLR locus, DM1. We show that the risk variants of DM1 and DM2d NLRs signal through the same pathway that is activated when plant NLRs recognize non-self elicitors. This requires the P loops of each protein and Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR)-domain-mediated heteromeric association of DM1 and DM2d. DM1 and DM2d each resides in a multimeric complex in the absence of signaling, with the DM1 complex shifting to higher molecular weight when heteromerizing DM2 variants are present. The activation of the DM1 complex appears to be sensitive to the conformation of the heteromerizing DM2 variant. Autoimmunity triggered by interaction of this NLR pair thus suggests that activity of heteromeric NLR signaling complexes depends on the sum of activation potentials of partner NLRs.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nicolas Denancé
Scoop.it!

F1000Research Article: Introducing the Brassica Information Portal: Towards integrating genotypic and phenotypic Brassica crop data.

The Brassica Information Portal (BIP) is a centralised repository for Brassica phenotypic data. Trait data associated with Brassica research and breeding experiments conducted on Brassica crops, used as vegetables, for livestock fodder and biofuels, is hosted on the site, together with information on the experimental plant materials used, as well as trial design. BIP is an open access and open source project, built on the schema of CropStoreDB, and as such can provide trait data management strategies for any crop data. A new user interface and programmatic submission/retrieval system helps to simplify data access for scientists and breeders. BIP opens up the opportunity to apply big data analyses to data generated by the Brassica Research Community. Here, we present a short description of the current status of the repository.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nicolas Denancé
Scoop.it!

Mol. Plant: Brassica rapa Genome 2.0: A Reference Upgrade through Sequence Re-assembly and Gene Re-annotation (2017)

Mol. Plant: Brassica rapa Genome 2.0: A Reference Upgrade through Sequence Re-assembly and Gene Re-annotation (2017) | Microbes, plant immunity, and crop science | Scoop.it
Empty description
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nicolas Denancé
Scoop.it!

TiPS: Multiscale Phenotyping and Decision Strategies in Breeding for Resistance (2017)

TiPS: Multiscale Phenotyping and Decision Strategies in Breeding for Resistance (2017) | Microbes, plant immunity, and crop science | Scoop.it
Advances in biotechnology have rendered tracking of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) a much easier task, making phenotyping, and not genotyping, the main bottleneck to integrating quantitative host plant resistance into breeding programs. The relevance of phenotyping methods is conditioned by their ability to predict the performance of a genotype at the field scale. Components of resistance represent the keystone hierarchy level between resistance expression in the field (the breeder’s scale) and QTLs (the geneticist’s scale). We describe approaches for upscaling processes to identify components of resistance that best predict field resistance, and for decision making for selection in breeding programs. We further highlight avenues for future research considering specific processes: disease transmission, defoliation, disease escape, polyetic processes, and interactions between components of resistance.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nicolas Denancé from Plant and Seed Biology
Scoop.it!

Genome editors take on crops

Genome editors take on crops | Microbes, plant immunity, and crop science | Scoop.it
The global population is expected to rise from 7.3 billion to 9.7 billion by 2050 ( 1 ). At the same time, climate change poses increasing risks to crop production through droughts and pests ( 2 ). Improved crops are thus urgently needed to meet growing demand for food and address changing climatic conditions. Genome-editing technologies such as the CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat)/Cas (CRISPR-associated protein) system ( 3 ) show promise for helping to address these challenges, if the precision of genome editing is improved and the technology is approved and accepted by regulators, producers, and consumers.

Via Loïc Lepiniec
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nicolas Denancé from Systems Biology of Plants & Microbes Interactions
Scoop.it!

The plant perceptron connects
environment to development | Nature

The plant perceptron connects <br/>environment to development | Nature | Microbes, plant immunity, and crop science | Scoop.it
"Plants cope with the environment in a variety of ways, and ecological analyses attempt to capture this through life-history strategies or trait-based categorization. These approaches are limited because they treat the trade-off mechanisms that underlie plant responses as a black box. Approaches that involve the molecular or physiological analysis of plant responses to the environment have elucidated intricate connections between developmental and environmental signals, but in only a few well-studied model species. By considering diversity in the plant response to the environment as the adaptation of an information-processing network, new directions can be found for the study of life-history strategies, trade-offs and evolution in plants."

Via Peyraud Rémi
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nicolas Denancé from Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education)
Scoop.it!

CRISPR, microbes and more are joining the war against crop killers

CRISPR, microbes and more are joining the war against crop killers | Microbes, plant immunity, and crop science | Scoop.it
Agricultural scientists look beyond synthetic chemistry to battle pesticide resistance.

Via Mary Williams
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nicolas Denancé from ECOLOGIE BIODIVERSITE PAYSAGE
Scoop.it!

Oser le génie végétal en rivière de montagne – Retour d'expérience sur les ouvrages Géni'Alp | Sciences Eaux & Territoires, la revue d'Irstea

Oser le génie végétal en rivière de montagne – Retour d'expérience sur les ouvrages Géni'Alp  | Sciences Eaux & Territoires, la revue d'Irstea | Microbes, plant immunity, and crop science | Scoop.it
Encore peu utilisées sur les cours d'eau dynamiques comme les rivières de montagne, les techniques de génie végétal représentent pourtant une solution écologique et économique pour la protection des berges. En s'appuyant sur le retour d'expérience de plusieurs chantiers pilotes en France et en Suisse, cet article s'intéresse à la capacité des techniques de génie végétal à résister sur des rivières de montagne associant contraintes climatiques, végétation et hydrologie particulière avec d'importantes contraintes physiques liées à l'eau et au transport solide.
Auteurs :  EVETTE, André ; FROSSARD, Pierre-André ; VALÉ, Nicolas ; LEBLOIS, Solange ; RECKING, Alain
Crédit photo : L'ouvrage de génie végétal Géni'Alp sur le Bens à Saint-Hugon : pendant les travaux. © A. Matringe

Via agrodoc_ouest
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nicolas Denancé from Pathogens, speciation, domestication, genomics, fungi, biotic interactions
Scoop.it!

Inferring Recent Demography from Isolation by Distance of Long Shared Sequence Blocks

Inferring Recent Demography from Isolation by Distance of Long Shared Sequence Blocks | Microbes, plant immunity, and crop science | Scoop.it
Recently it has become feasible to detect long blocks of nearly identical sequence shared between pairs of genomes. These IBD blocks are direct traces of recent coalescence events and, as such, contain ample signal to infer recent demography. Here, we examine sharing of such blocks in two-dimensional populations with local migration. Using a diffusion approximation to trace genetic ancestry, we derive analytical formulae for patterns of isolation by distance of IBD blocks, which can also incorporate recent population density changes. We introduce an inference scheme that uses a composite likelihood approach to fit these formulae. We then extensively evaluate our theory and inference method on a range of scenarios using simulated data. We first validate the diffusion approximation by showing that the theoretical results closely match the simulated block sharing patterns. We then demonstrate that our inference scheme can accurately and robustly infer dispersal rate and effective density, as well as bounds on recent dynamics of population density. To demonstrate an application, we use our estimation scheme to explore the fit of a diffusion model to Eastern European samples in the POPRES data set. We show that ancestry diffusing with a rate of σ ≈ 50–100 km/√gen during the last centuries, combined with accelerating population growth, can explain the observed exponential decay of block sharing with increasing pairwise sample distance.

Via Pierre Gladieux
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nicolas Denancé
Scoop.it!

GMR: Mapping and validation of Xanthomonas citri subsp citri genes regulated by putative plant-inducible promoter box (PIP-box) (2016)

Citrus canker, caused by the Gram-negative bacterium Xanthomonas citri subsp citri (Xac), is a major disease affecting citriculture worldwide, because of the susceptibility of the host and the lack of efficient control methods. Previous studies have reported that some genes of phytopathogenic bacteria possess a consensus nucleotide sequence (TTCGC...N15...TTCGC) designated the “plant-inducible-promoter box” (PIP box) located in the promoter region, which is responsible for activating the expression of pathogenicity and virulence factors when the pathogen is in contact with the host plant. In this study, we mapped and investigated the expression of 104 Xac genes associated with the PIP box sequences using a macroarray analysis. Xac gene expression was observed during in vitro (Xac grown for 12 or 20 h in XAM1 induction medium) or in vivo (bacteria grown in orange leaves for 3 to 5 days) infection conditions. Xac grown in non-induction NB liquid medium was used as the control. cDNA was isolated from bacteria grown under the different conditions and hybridized to the macroarray, and 32 genes differentially expressed during the infection period (in vitro or in vivo induction) were identified. The macroarray results were validated for some of the genes through semi-quantitative RT-PCR, and the functionality of the PIP box-containing promoter was demonstrated by activating b-glucuronidase reporter gene activity by the PIP box-containing promoter region during Xac-citrus host interaction. Citrus canker, caused by the Gram-negative bacterium Xanthomonas citri subsp citri (Xac), is a major disease affecting citriculture worldwide, because of the susceptibility of the host and the lack of efficient control methods. Previous studies have reported that some genes of phytopathogenic bacteria possess a consensus nucleotide sequence (TTCGC...N15...TTCGC) designated the “plant-inducible-promoter box” (PIP box) located in the promoter region, which is responsible for activating the expression of pathogenicity and virulence factors when the pathogen is in contact with the host plant. In this study, we mapped and investigated the expression of 104 Xac genes associated with the PIP box sequences using a macroarray analysis. Xac gene expression was observed during in vitro (Xac grown for 12 or 20 h in XAM1 induction medium) or in vivo (bacteria grown in orange leaves for 3 to 5 days) infection conditions. Xac grown in non-induction NB liquid medium was used as the control. cDNA was isolated from bacteria grown under the different conditions and hybridized to the macroarray, and 32 genes differentially expressed during the infection period (in vitro or in vivo induction) were identified. The macroarray results were validated for some of the genes through semi-quantitative RT-PCR, and the functionality of the PIP box-containing promoter was demonstrated by activating b-glucuronidase reporter gene activity by the PIP box-containing promoter region during Xac-citrus host interaction.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nicolas Denancé from Plant-Microbe Symbiosis
Scoop.it!

Plant signalling in symbiosis and immunity 

Plant signalling in symbiosis and immunity  | Microbes, plant immunity, and crop science | Scoop.it
Plants encounter a myriad of microorganisms, particularly at the root–soil interface, that can invade with detrimental or beneficial outcomes. Prevalent beneficial associations between plants and microorganisms include those that promote plant growth by facilitating the acquisition of limiting nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus. But while promoting such symbiotic relationships, plants must restrict the formation of pathogenic associations. Achieving this balance requires the perception of potential invading microorganisms through the signals that they produce, followed by the activation of either symbiotic responses that promote microbial colonization or immune responses that limit it.


Via Jean-Michel Ané
Nicolas Denancé's insight:

Very good review

more...
Jean-Michel Ané's curator insight, March 21, 4:18 PM

Very good review

Sanjay Swami's curator insight, March 23, 4:47 AM
Share your insight
Scooped by Nicolas Denancé
Scoop.it!

TiPS: RNA-Binding Proteins Revisited – The Emerging Arabidopsis mRNA Interactome

TiPS: RNA-Binding Proteins Revisited – The Emerging Arabidopsis mRNA Interactome | Microbes, plant immunity, and crop science | Scoop.it
RNA–protein interaction is an important checkpoint to tune gene expression at the RNA level. Global identification of proteins binding in vivo to mRNA has been possible through interactome capture – where proteins are fixed to target RNAs by UV crosslinking and purified through affinity capture of polyadenylated RNA. In Arabidopsis over 500 RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) enriched in UV-crosslinked samples have been identified. As in mammals and yeast, the mRNA interactomes came with a few surprises. For example, a plethora of the proteins caught on RNA had not previously been linked to RNA-mediated processes, for example proteins of intermediary metabolism. Thus, the studies provide unprecedented insights into the composition of the mRNA interactome, highlighting the complexity of RNA-mediated processes.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nicolas Denancé
Scoop.it!

Nat. Commun: Genome assembly with in vitro proximity ligation data and whole-genome triplication in lettuce (2017)

Nat. Commun: Genome assembly with in vitro proximity ligation data and whole-genome triplication in lettuce (2017) | Microbes, plant immunity, and crop science | Scoop.it
Lettuce (Lactuca sativa) is a major crop and a member of the large, highly successful Compositae family of flowering plants. Here we present a reference assembly for the species and family. This was generated using whole-genome shotgun Illumina reads plus in vitro proximity ligation data to create large superscaffolds; it was validated genetically and superscaffolds were oriented in genetic bins ordered along nine chromosomal pseudomolecules. We identify several genomic features that may have contributed to the success of the family, including genes encoding Cycloidea-like transcription factors, kinases, enzymes involved in rubber biosynthesis and disease resistance proteins that are expanded in the genome. We characterize 21 novel microRNAs, one of which may trigger phasiRNAs from numerous kinase transcripts. We provide evidence for a whole-genome triplication event specific but basal to the Compositae. We detect 26% of the genome in triplicated regions containing 30% of all genes that are enriched for regulatory sequences and depleted for genes involved in defence.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nicolas Denancé
Scoop.it!

Mol. Ecol. Introduction: microbial local adaptation: insights from natural populations, genomics and experimental evolution (2017)

Mol. Ecol. Introduction: microbial local adaptation: insights from natural populations, genomics and experimental evolution (2017) | Microbes, plant immunity, and crop science | Scoop.it
Click on the article title to read more.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nicolas Denancé
Scoop.it!

Mol. Plant Pathol.: The role of type III effectors from Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. manihotis in virulence and suppression of plant immunity (2017€

Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. manihotis (Xam) causes cassava bacterial blight, the most important bacterial disease of cassava. Xam, like other Xanthomonas species, requires type III effectors (T3Es
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nicolas Denancé
Scoop.it!

Current Biology: Building Barriers… in Roots (2017)

Current Biology: Building Barriers… in Roots (2017) | Microbes, plant immunity, and crop science | Scoop.it

The Casparian strip is an important barrier regulating water and nutrient uptake into root tissues. New research reveals two peptide signals and their co-receptors play critical roles patterning and maintaining barrier integrity.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nicolas Denancé from Plant-microbe interaction
Scoop.it!

Bodyguards: Pathogen-Derived Decoys That Protect Virulence Factors

Bodyguards: Pathogen-Derived Decoys That Protect Virulence Factors | Microbes, plant immunity, and crop science | Scoop.it
Recent studies on plant-pathogen interactions have exposed a new strategy used by plant pathogens: decoy effectors that protect virulence factors. Examples of these “bodyguards” include the recently discovered PsXLP1 from Phytophthora sojae and truncated TALEs from Xanthomonas oryzae. These examples suggest important roles for seemingly non-functional effector proteins in distracting the host.

Via Suayib Üstün
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nicolas Denancé from The Plant Microbiome
Scoop.it!

The multilayer nature of ecological networks

The multilayer nature of ecological networks | Microbes, plant immunity, and crop science | Scoop.it

Although networks provide a powerful approach to study a large variety of ecological systems, their formulation does not typically account for multiple interaction types, interactions that vary in space and time, and interconnected systems such as networks of networks. The emergent field of ‘multilayer networks’ provides a natural framework for extending analyses of ecological systems to include such multiple layers of complexity, as it specifically allows one to differentiate and model ‘intralayer’ and ‘interlayer’ connectivity. The framework provides a set of concepts and tools that can be adapted and applied to ecology, facilitating research on high-dimensional, heterogeneous systems in nature. Here, we formally define ecological multilayer networks based on a review of previous, related approaches; illustrate their application and potential with analyses of existing data; and discuss limitations, challenges, and future applications. The integration of multilayer network theory into ecology offers largely untapped potential to investigate ecological complexity and provide new theoretical and empirical insights into the architecture and dynamics of ecological systems.


Via Stéphane Hacquard
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nicolas Denancé from Plant immunity and legume symbiosis
Scoop.it!

Plant Immunity Inducer Development and Application | Molecular Plant-Microbe Interactions

Plant Immunity Inducer Development and Application | Molecular Plant-Microbe Interactions | Microbes, plant immunity, and crop science | Scoop.it
Plant immunity inducers represent a new and rapidly developing field in plant protection research. In this paper, we discuss recent research on plant immunity inducers and their development and applications in China. Plant immunity inducers include plant immunity-inducing proteins, chitosan oligosaccharides, and microbial inducers. These compounds and microorganisms can trigger defense responses and confer disease resistance in plants. We also describe the mechanisms of plant immunity inducers and how they promote plant health. Furthermore, we summarize the current situation in plant immunity inducer development in China and the global marketplace. Finally, we also deeply analyze the development trends and application prospects of plant immunity inducers in environmental protection and food safety.

Via Christophe Jacquet
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nicolas Denancé from Pathogens, speciation, domestication, genomics, fungi, biotic interactions
Scoop.it!

Genomic history of the origin and domestication of common bean unveils its closest sister species

Modern civilization depends on only a few plant species for its nourishment. These crops were derived via several thousands of years of human selection that transformed wild ancestors into high-yielding domesticated descendants. Among cultivated plants, common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is the most important grain legume. Yet, our understanding of the origins and concurrent shaping of the genome of this crop plant is limited. We sequenced the genomes of 29 accessions representing 12 Phaseolus species. Single nucleotide polymorphism-based phylogenomic analyses, using both the nuclear and chloroplast genomes, allowed us to detect a speciation event, a finding further supported by metabolite profiling. In addition, we identified ~1200 protein coding genes (PCGs) and ~100 long non-coding RNAs with domestication-associated haplotypes. Finally, we describe asymmetric introgression events occurring among common bean subpopulations in Mesoamerica and across hemispheres. We uncover an unpredicted speciation event in the tropical Andes that gave rise to a sibling species, formerly considered the “wild ancestor” of P. vulgaris, which diverged before the split of the Mesoamerican and Andean P. vulgaris gene pools. Further, we identify haplotypes strongly associated with genes underlying the emergence of domestication traits. Our findings also reveal the capacity of a predominantly autogamous plant to outcross and fix loci from different populations, even from distant species, which led to the acquisition by domesticated beans of adaptive traits from wild relatives. The occurrence of such adaptive introgressions should be exploited to accelerate breeding programs in the near future.

Via Pierre Gladieux
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nicolas Denancé
Scoop.it!

Front. Plant Sci.: Effector Mimics and Integrated Decoys, the Never-Ending Arms Race between Rice and Xanthomonas oryzae (2017)

Front. Plant Sci.: Effector Mimics and Integrated Decoys, the Never-Ending Arms Race between Rice and Xanthomonas oryzae (2017) | Microbes, plant immunity, and crop science | Scoop.it
Plants are constantly challenged by a wide range of pathogens and have therefore evolved an array of mechanisms to defend against them. In response to these defense systems, pathogens have evolved strategies to avoid recognition and suppress plant defenses (Brown & Tellier 2011). Three recent reports dealing with the resistance of rice to Xanthomonas oryzae have added a new twist to our understanding of this fascinating co-evolutionary arms race (Ji et al. 2016; Read et al. 2016 and Triplett et al. 2016). They show that pathogens also develop sophisticated effector mimics to trick recognition.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nicolas Denancé from Forêt, Bois, Milieux naturels : politique, législation et réglementation
Scoop.it!

L’ONF fait le plein de projets avec l’IGN, l’INRA et AgroParisTech

L’ONF fait le plein de projets avec l’IGN, l’INRA et AgroParisTech | Microbes, plant immunity, and crop science | Scoop.it
Télédétection, portail Web, cartographie, renouvellement des peuplements forestiers, sont au programme de partenariats impliquant plusieurs acteurs publics.

Via AgroParisTech Documentation Nancy
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nicolas Denancé from Emerging Research in Plant Cell Biology
Scoop.it!

New phytol.: Diverse mechanisms of resistance to Pseudomonas syringae in a thousand natural accessions of Arabidopsis thaliana (2017)

New phytol.: Diverse mechanisms of resistance to Pseudomonas syringae in a thousand natural accessions of Arabidopsis thaliana (2017) | Microbes, plant immunity, and crop science | Scoop.it

Plants are continuously threatened by pathogen attack and, as such, they have evolved mechanisms to evade, escape and defend themselves against pathogens. However, it is not known what types of defense mechanisms a plant would already possess to defend against a potential pathogen that has not co-evolved with the plant. We addressed this important question in a comprehensive manner by studying the responses of 1041 accessions of Arabidopsis thaliana to the foliar pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) DC3000. We characterized the interaction using a variety of established methods, including different inoculation techniques, bacterial mutant strains, and assays for the hypersensitive response, salicylic acid (SA) accumulation and reactive oxygen species production . Fourteen accessions showed resistance to infection by Pst DC3000. Of these, two accessions had a surface-based mechanism of resistance, six showed a hypersensitive-like response while three had elevated SA levels. Interestingly, A. thaliana was discovered to have a recognition system for the effector AvrPto, and HopAM1 was found to modulate Pst DC3000 resistance in two accessions. Our comprehensive study has significant implications for the understanding of natural disease resistance mechanisms at the species level and for the ecology and evolution of plant–pathogen interactions.


Via Jennifer Mach
more...
No comment yet.