Effective Fractions Instruction
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Fractions: Using a Number Line to Teach Fractions

Fractions: Using a Number Line to Teach Fractions | Effective Fractions Instruction | Scoop.it
Teachers in this multimedia presentation from Doing What Works demonstrate the use of a double-scaled, open number line to teach fractions to upper elementary students.

Via Mel Riddile
Todd Parker's insight:

This is a video with strategies for math instruction using open number lines.  One of the strategies was for teaching fractions.  I like how using the open number line lets students choose what numbers to use to represent the fractions.  Different students might use different numbers.  They are only limited by using numbers with factors that correspond with the fractions.  In the case of fractions they use a "double open" number line with numbers on the bottom and fractions on top.  This method helps students use problem solving skills and take charge of some of the process.  It also calls upon their previous knowledge of factors.  I've never used this method, but it seems like something that I would want to try with fifth graders.  I also like that in part of the video there is an anchor poster with problem solving strategies on it.  Maybe I need one of those as well.  All of the anchor posters in my class are dedicated to reading and writing.

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A Passion for Fractions | Teaching Channel

A Passion for Fractions | Teaching Channel | Effective Fractions Instruction | Scoop.it
Great lesson to teach students how to multiply fractions. This multiple part lesson is perfect for grade 4 and 5 students as they learn to multiply fractions. Aligns with Common Core Standards for Math.

Via Mel Riddile
Todd Parker's insight:

This is another Teaching channel video.  I love this resource.  This one is dedicated to teaching fractions and is aligned with Common Core.  It lists the standards used and explains the techniques as you go.  It goes through showing the problem in multiple ways for multiple learning styles and how to walk students through a problem solving process.  My fifth graders have shown me that they need practice in working through and persevering in problem solving.  I believe that if we systematically walk them through a process, then they will eventually adopt this process for themselves and become more effective thinkers.  They are not there yet, but resources like this video are great learning tools for teachers on how to get the thinking across to the students.

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Rachel Dwyer's curator insight, September 23, 2013 10:22 PM

I think that this video of a lession on A Passion for Fractions is a great resource. While mainly targeted at 3-5 grade, this teacher implements and incorporates various strategies that are both teaching and learning practices, in this particular case of exploring fractions. A lot come through for me and connected with what we have been discussing in our classes and in Math in particular. This teacher starts with a story which uses and incorporates math to encourage interest and curiousity among the students. They are then guided to develop and explore a riddle to solve. She provides opportunities and specifically directs to extend previous understanding. She also guides them in exploring representations and understanding the task. She also discusses how she provides them with multiple entry points.

The math curriculum for Fifth Grade includes several units on fractions. I feel that the approach and meaningful experiences represented in this video have provided me with insight and some great ideas on how to teach students to multiply fractions.

One other aspect that I really appreciate is instilling in students a passion for fractions. This allows learning to be relevant and accessible for students when they experience content in a way that they can understand and relate to. This in turnves them an excitement and motivation for that learning, and they have a reason and purpose for learning it.

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Interactive Fraction Wall explore Fractions Percentages and Decimals

Interactive Fraction Wall explore Fractions Percentages and Decimals | Effective Fractions Instruction | Scoop.it
Visnos interactive html5 fraction wall, use on an interactive white board to explore fraction decimals & percentages. Useful to learn equivalent fractions.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
Todd Parker's insight:

This is an interactive fraction whiteboard which allows quick manipulation of fractions.  It also allows you to move into different modes such as decimals and percentages and incorporates LCM's and other features as well.  As an instructor, this would be a wonderful tool.  My fifth graders are very slow at using physical math manipulatives.  While it is good to have them physically touching the manipulatives, there are times that you will be lecturing and want to keep the pace up while giving a full and thorough visual of what you are doing.  This allows you to give the manipilative experience at a quick and clean pace and allows you to incorporate decimals and percentages just as quickly if you are teaching the relationships between these concepts.  This is an excellent teacher tool.  It's simple to use and has just about everything you need.  There are tiumes for students to break out the manipulatives and there are times for this tool as well.

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Easy way to teach fractions using Legos to children - Imgur

Easy way to teach fractions using Legos to children - Imgur | Effective Fractions Instruction | Scoop.it
The plural of Lego is Lego. derschlawin0r 5 points : an instant ago reply. wtf? there no better way to teach fractions than using pizza!!! IsakHunt 6 points : an instant ago reply. *Lego no S ffs! Trollie 6 points : an instant ago reply.

Via cafonso
Todd Parker's insight:

This is an excellent idea for teaching basic fractions.  Legos are great for a couple of reasons.  They are cheap, so acquiring them in not a hardship.  They come in different colors, so it's easy to see differences.  They divide up into the basic fractions that are taught.  Lastly, they are something that every student is familiar with and most likely has experience playing with.  While traditional math manipulatives might seem a little foreign to students, Legos are like an old friend.  My students had a little trouble with our manipulatives.  I should have used Legos instread.  I would make a sheet like the one in the picture as a key and I would hang it up for everybody or project it onto the Smartboard.

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Freddy's Fractions

Freddy's Fractions | Effective Fractions Instruction | Scoop.it

This is a fun flash game where players help a turtle to swim and collect the correct equivalent fractions.
http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/Maths


Via ICTmagic
Todd Parker's insight:

This is a fraction game for students.  There are others as well.  This is just an example.  This could be added to computer centers or for use at home as extra practice.  It tends to work on one skill at a time and lets kids concentrate on that skill.  It is more interactive than just putting in numbers, but it still makes the player/student concentrate on the math skill in order to do well.  This is an area where math has really benefitted.  Internet based educational games are abundant and should be a part of at-school instruction and a list should be made readily available for parents.  They usually are aware of the shortcomings of their children and can turn to these resources to strengthen their skills.  In my classroom we have had several parents request lists of internet resources.  Unfortunately, we don't have them all listed in a central location and accessible to all parents, but we should.

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Jiyoon Jane Kim's curator insight, May 15, 2015 7:25 AM

This game requires students to control Freddy the turtle so that he can eat fractions and decimals larger than the fraction written on the screen. This game requires extensive essential cognitive processing as students need to hold and recall the fraction written on the screen and convert it to decimals and equivalent fractions at the same time. The absence of audio in this game may seem like a weak point in this resource but it actually prevents “incidental processing” (Mayer & Moreno, 2003, p. 46) and focus on the essential content, i.e. converting fractions and decimals in the game.

 

The game has 'lives' and moves up levels when Fredday has eaten all the fractions. This is a subtle form of feedback that let's students know whether they had correct or incorrect answers. Like in any implementation of ICT resource TPACK framework should be considered to assess the appropriateness of the resource for target content, pedagody and learners.

 

Since this game requires quick mental computation students can play this game in pairs. Both students can help each other and take turns in controlling Freddy as they move up a level.Freddy’s fraction will be a fun game based consolidation and an extension of equivalent fractions and decimals.

 

References: Mayer, R.E.,& Moreno,R. (2003). Nine Ways to Reduce Cognitive Load in Multimedia Learning. Educational Psychologist, 38(1), 43-52.