Considerations about poverty and its effect on education
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Rising child poverty pushes American dream out of reach for many - Fox News

Rising child poverty pushes American dream out of reach for many - Fox News | Considerations about poverty and its effect on education | Scoop.it
Rising child poverty pushes American dream out of reach for many Fox News The Southern Education Foundation found that, for the first time in 40 years, the majority of public school students in 13 southern and four western states are living at...
Rose Heim's insight:

The statistics that 1 in 7 young adults are not in school or working at a job and that the majority of public school students in 17 states are living in poverty came as a real surprise to me. I have been used to thinking that poverty is a big city problem, and I'm sure that it is a problem in the larger cities of those states, but I never realized how this affected the statistics of the states as a whole. I was also surprised that the study showed the biggest problem in southern and western states. I know that poverty exists in our own area and cities like Chigago, New York, Trenton, Philadelphia, and Washington D.C. stand out in my memory as areas where poverty is constantly reported about in the news. All in all, this report was a real eye opener for me. I was raised in a lower middle class family and rarely had to deal with issues like no money to pay the electric bill or buy food. To realize that so many young people experience these kinds of issues saddens me. The implication in a school situation is that these kids may be hungry, sick, and have minimal resources. According to the report, many of these children are from single parent homes, which to me means that they will have also have less of a support system available to them when they are in school than I enjoyed. The report mentioned the need for jobs to abate the poverty problem. It is beyond the scope of a school system to provide for that need so my questions are along the lines of what can we do through the education system to bring relief to poverty stricken students and how much do I really know about how poverty affects a family?

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Kelvin Tsui's curator insight, January 19, 2014 9:01 AM

THis is a great example for many to further understand more about how great od an impact poverty has on kids and childern. Many young ones out there have big dreams and ambitions, just like myself. For example, i want to be a successful lawyer in the future and to do that, i need a good quality education and a quick and smart mind to achieve this dream of mine, but to do that, i need to be strudying in a schoo, which i am now , and that i must be able to learn many things from school. Sadly, most kids and childern from other countries are not able to attend school just because they cannot afford the school fees. This is reaslly sad to hear because, these kids have an ambition to work for, but they cannot even learn anything becuase of their lack of income from their parents, thus, they know that this ambition is just a dream to them. I think that this makes me want to change and solve world poverty once and for all. i really feel for them and i think that everyone should too.

SM Punk's comment, January 27, 2014 11:41 PM
I agree with Kelvin, children who are suffering in poverty cannot afford an education and I personally think it is a sad waste of talent. Who knows, maybe the cure for cancer is trapped inside the mind of one of those children who can't afford an education.
Phoebe Tan's comment, January 31, 2014 11:24 AM
I do agree with Joey that it is a fortunate situation that we are experiencing being born in middle income families, where education isn't an issue for us. Well, i do sympathise with the single parents where they have to manage between work and the child. They are trying their best to fulfil their job as a parent and maybe as parents. It might be a really tough job and they did not give up. Education isn't an abundance to them. From this, couples should stay strong together in order for a better future for their child. And that although not all of this issues can be avoided, the government should do something to help them achieve the children goals in life. It shouldn't be down fall just because of their family background. They should be given the chance to be exposed to education.
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All Girls Academy Breaks the Cycle of Poverty

All Girls Academy Breaks the Cycle of Poverty | Considerations about poverty and its effect on education | Scoop.it
Watch how one new school is helping students living in poverty to beat the odds. This new all girls academy is demanding for both students and parents, but the results in student confidence, competence and connectedness are undeniable.
Rose Heim's insight:

This was a story of how one school is helping girls to break the cycle of poverty. There were interesting ideas, some of which I wish could translate into the public school system: small all girls middle school, three meals a day provided , small class size of 10 or 11 students, a requirement for parents to volunteer 2 hours every week, 11 hour class days, a safe and friendly environment. Eleven hour days do seem very long but the video points out that sometimes kids don't really have anything to go home to. Their parents may be working 2 or 3 jobs to make ends meet. So, keeping the kids at school helps them to have some good structure and support in their lives. I am observing classes and tutoring at a school where there are a lot of kids in poverty - the school does provide three meals a day and a few of the classes are small - approximately a dozen students. Unfortunately parent involvement is not perceived to be high there and there is no way to force parents to volunteer. Short of making it a requirement I wonder what can be done to improve this situation. Long school days require alot from students but also require a high level of committment from the teachers and staff. I have heard plenty of current teachers in different school systems complain about long hours. I know that the school day does not end for them when the students go home,  but it's just neat to see teachers with a different attitude about so much time being spent at school. It would take alot of sacrifice but somehow I think that the results would make it all worth it.

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Leading Learning for Children From Poverty

Leading Learning for Children From Poverty | Considerations about poverty and its effect on education | Scoop.it
What bridges the gap between a culture of despair and a future of hope for children who live in poverty?
Rose Heim's insight:

From the article: "Effective educators of children who live in poverty understand the important role of connecting, validating, educating, responding, leading, and succeeding with children who live in these environments." Honestly, these are the same roles which I believe will be important for me in reaching all of the children that I teach! I hope that I can look past all of the baggage that comes with each individual and be able to see them as "diamonds in the rough". My duty will be to study each "gem" so as to understand how to bring out its best characteristics. The article does give 21 tips of how to work with children in poverty. I like that these include such things as to maintaining high expectations, building relationships and teaching in multiple ways. These are things with which I am comfortable. I am not comfortable when I think about poverty - and I think that's normal for someone who hasn't been there. But as this article helped me to see, I don't need to be particularly comfortable with it to be able to help students rise above it. This gives me hope!

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Oklahoma is schooling the nation on early education - Washington Post

Oklahoma is schooling the nation on early education - Washington Post | Considerations about poverty and its effect on education | Scoop.it
Washington Post Oklahoma is schooling the nation on early education Washington Post What gets lost in the hype about K-12 education reform, and the unhealthy obsession with things like standardized tests and charter schools, are a child's crucial...
Rose Heim's insight:

I see value in what Oklahoma did in drastically increasing full day preschool funding and extending its availability to the poor. If it is true that children from poverty who do not attend preschool start at a disadvantage and keep a disadvantage as their schooling continues, this approach sounds great. I am not naive, however. This is not a one size fits all approach. In a static neighborhood, yes - I believe that granting access to early childhood education to the impoverished can help to level the playing field. However, not every child comes in to our education system as a preschooler, and there is still alot of work that needs to be done to figure out the best ways to have the older child from poverty who is just attending school for the first time at age 12 (for example) the same kinds of  benefits. This is such a complex problem! There are many well-intentioned solutions, but it doesn't seem like there is any pat answer. I suppose politicians and scholars will be arguing about "the best solution" for many decades to come.

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Five stereotypes about poor families and education

Five stereotypes about poor families and education | Considerations about poverty and its effect on education | Scoop.it
The list, plus how stereotypes affect the way students perform in classes.
Rose Heim's insight:

I have heard each of the stereotypes mentioned in this article: poor people don't value education, poor people are lazy, poor people abuse substances, poor people are not good communicators and poor parents are inattentive. I sadly admit that when I hear of a case in which a poor person or family follows one of the stereotypes it is easy to think that the stereotype must be true in general. Unfortunately I can also say that I have heard many educators speak of poor families in terms of these stereotypes. I am working hard to stop making assumptions about students and families when symptoms which some attribute to one of theses stereotypes about poor people occur (parents do not show up at parent-teacher conferences, a child does not do his homework). I must strive to maintain high expectations for all of my students and their families. I must work hard to communicate my expectations to them and to do my part to make opportunities available to my students (through education). I must do my part to make sure that the attitudes that most people have about the poor are not part of who I am - otherwise I will help to ensure what I already assume. To me it comes down to this - we are all alike in that we have struggles to overcome. I can't let the particulars of those struggles affect my efforts to offer my very best to every one of my students every day.

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The real 21st-century problem in public education

The real 21st-century problem in public education | Considerations about poverty and its effect on education | Scoop.it
New data shows the problem getting worse.
Rose Heim's insight:

Washington Post Blog brings out some more issues which poverty causes in schools. Some issues like hunger are being overcome in schools in high poverty areas when they provide three meals a day to their students. I have seen an example locally where this is the case. I also participate in a program called "Smart Sacks" which provides a bag of food for poor students to take home each week of school. But what about other problems that affect student's ability to concentrate and succeed in school...preventable diseases, life situations which could be improved by counseling, untapped talents in music and the arts that could be great motivators,lack of emphasis on physical activity to stay healthy? It is interesting to think about how economics has caused schools to make counselors, ESL teachers, nurses, music teachers and the like expendable yet these are the very resource people that students in poverty need most. I cannot make up for the lack of support personnel in my school, nor should I be expected to do so. It is simply too much for any one person to take on. What I can do is to offer a safe and caring environment for my students and hope that the economic challenges which shortchange students at risk will be overcome.

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Closing the Opportunity Gap | Education and Workforce

Closing the Opportunity Gap | Education and Workforce | Considerations about poverty and its effect on education | Scoop.it
Rose Heim's insight:

I really was encouraged by this article because I am going to be a middle school math and science teacher and this piece mentioned an MIT study which cited the fact that developing a love of STEM subjects in middle school is a great indicator of whether or not a child will eventually choose a career in STEM. To me this means that I can really have a positive impact! I liked the way that the organization mentioned in this article, Citizen Schools, was getting real STEM career people to come into the school regularly, not just one day a year or even one day a month. Allowing the kids to do projects side by side with real STEM professionals seem to help them get really excited about their potential. This would be a great addition to any school! The downside is that Citizen Schools extend the school day by three hours! This is not the first time that I have heard about extending the school day in low income areas - the reasoning according to Citizens Schools is to give the low income kids an opportunity for the same kinds of "extensions" to their school that kids from more affluent neighborhoods already get - through music education, clubs and the like. Students from Citizens Schools have been shown to enter college at the same rates as kids who were not from low-income families. In general this shows that investing into the lives of kids from poverty can help break the cycle.

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Rich Kid, Poor Kid: How Mixed Neighborhoods Could Save America's Schools

Rich Kid, Poor Kid: How Mixed Neighborhoods Could Save America's Schools | Considerations about poverty and its effect on education | Scoop.it
In a former Atlanta slum, low- and middle-income families now live side by side -- and send their children to the same excellent school. Is this surprising model too good to be true?
Rose Heim's insight:

I have heard about "reviatlization" projects in respect to areas like downtown Silver Spring, but I had not thought about how such projects can really help to lower the concentration of poverty in an area and specifically the public schools there. Understandably, this can't be done everywhere, but where it can be done this seems like a better idea than putting a few special schools in place (like Esperanza mentioned in an earlier article) or choosing to have your child be bussed to a far away school in a better area - a practice which in my mind leads to a disconnect between home and school life. The federal grant program mentioned in the article seems like a great idea - rewarding a community's wholistic look at poverty and what it takes to break the cycle - including creation of jobs - with money to reviatlize. Concentrated poverty does no great service to anyone. Breaking it up should be like a breath of fresh air to those who have had to endure it.

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Brandon Gopilan's curator insight, January 19, 2014 4:49 AM

From the article, I can say that mixed neighbourhoods can just save the schools that children go to despite poverty being present. What I do know from the past is that the people who are either have low-income or  dark-coloured and living in a dark-coloured neighbourhood, will send their children to a school with a majority of them being dark-coloured as well as  with the stereotype that we often see in movies that dark-coloured people are poor. However, this connects to what I know that middle-income families and low-income families can go to the same school despite their difference in their income that they get. But, with the help of the impoverished neighbourhood and their resilience to get their children education, they succeeded in making a making that gives quality education not only to middle-income families, bu to low-income families too. Although, there are still some questions that linger in my head after reading this article. Such as "How many more ways can we invite middle-income families to come and enroll their children into a school which is pre-dominantly occupied  by African-American children?" and "How to help more of the people who are impoverished and not even able to even afford the school fees that the school has to offer?
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