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Università, alta formazione, studiare all'estero: notizie dal mondo accademico italiano e internazionale
Curated by Damiano Fedeli
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Google acquiring startup from CS department at University of Toronto - ZDNet

Google acquiring startup from CS department at University of Toronto - ZDNet | Edusfera | Scoop.it
Techvibes (blog)
Google acquiring startup from CS department at University of Toronto
ZDNet
The news was confirmed on Tuesday by the Canadian university.
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Chomsky: The Corporate Assault on Public Education

Chomsky: The Corporate Assault on Public Education | Edusfera | Scoop.it
Our kids are being prepared for passive obedience, not creative, independent lives.

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Ana Cristina Pratas's curator insight, March 13, 2013 1:12 AM
Chomsky: The Corporate Assault on Public Education
Our kids are being prepared for passive obedience, not creative, independent lives.
March 8, 2013  |  
 

The following is Part II of the transcript of a speech Noam Chomsky delivered in February on "The Common Good." Click here to read Part I.



Let’s turn to the assault on education, one element of the general elite reaction to the civilizing effect of the ‘60s. On the right side of the political spectrum, one striking illustration is an influential memorandum written by Lewis Powell, a corporate lawyer working for the tobacco industry, later appointed to the Supreme Court by Richard Nixon. At the other end of the narrow spectrum, there was an important study by the Trilateral Commission, liberal internationalists from the three major state capitalist industrial systems: the US, Europe and Japan. Both provide good insight into why the assault targets the educational system.


Let's start with the Powell memorandum. Its title is, “The Attack on the American Free-Enterprise System." It is interesting not only for the content, but also for the paranoid tone. For those who take for granted the right to rule, anything that gets out of control means that the world is coming to an end, like a spoiled three-year-old. So the rhetoric tends to be inflated and paranoid.

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Liberty University uses online education to make it big - The Virginian-Pilot

Liberty University uses online education to make it big The Virginian-Pilot The small Baptist college that television preacher Jerry Falwell founded in 1971 has capitalized on the online education boom to become an evangelical mega-university with...
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The End of Education As We Know It

The End of Education As We Know It | Edusfera | Scoop.it

Way back in 1984, psychologist Benjamin Bloom reported some shocking study results: Students who engaged in individualized tutoring with a teacher scored 98 percent better than the average performance of students in the traditional classroom. This led Bloom to propose his famous “2 Sigma Problem”: How can we accomplish the same results using methods other than peer tutoring, which are “too costly for most societies to bear on a large scale”? If Bloom were alive today, he’d surely be astonished—and encouraged—by the mass-market, loss-cost and, perhaps most strikingly, engaging possibilities

 


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Nik Peachey's curator insight, March 13, 2013 5:51 AM

Well not quite living up to the title, but a good general read about some things that have been bubbling up for a while.

Dr. Doris Molero's curator insight, March 14, 2013 6:05 PM

I definetely like this approach to accessing students performance..


No Wrong Answers


As he noted in his TEDGlobal talk, Schocken believes that the traditional grading system is “degrading”—and he’d rather talk about a more positive approach to teaching that he calls “upgrading.” This means rejecting the traditional focus on correct answers. Instead, Schocken thinks we should encourage mistakes. In his app-based learning environments, if you give the wrong answer, nothing horrible happens. “We never say ‘incorrect,’ ‘wrong,’ and so on. Instead, when students give answers that aren’t the right ones, we use a non-verbal and neutral visual gesture, like vibrating the image a little,” Schocken said. This implies something like “nice try, keep trying, I’m waiting patiently, take your time.” And, after two wrong answers are entered in a row, the program gives a tip leading to the correct direction.

Angela Rupert's curator insight, March 18, 2013 10:18 AM

Another excellent arguement for individualized education

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Madison '16: What is the value of higher education? - The Brown Daily Herald

Madison '16: What is the value of higher education? - The Brown Daily Herald | Edusfera | Scoop.it
Madison '16: What is the value of higher education?
The Brown Daily Herald
Higher education is now widely accepted as an essential step to future success. But at what price can we justify the gain we get from this — at least — four-year experience?
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On Your Side: Investigating Higher Education | MyFOX8.com

On Your Side: Investigating Higher Education | MyFOX8.com | Edusfera | Scoop.it
It's the time of year when high school seniors make big decisions about where to go to college. It's not just about a pretty campus and good professors--there are plenty of other factors parents and students should consider ...
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