EDUP3002 - ES1: 'Recognisable differences between languages spoken in their neighbourhood'
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EDUP3002 - ES1: 'Recognisable differences between languages spoken in their neighbourhood'
This ScoopIt page is a compilation of five resources designed for ES1 teachers who are teaching 'Cultures' in HSIE // Outcome: CUES1 - Communicates some common characteristics that all people share, as well as some of the differences // Subject matter: Recognisable differences between languages spoken in their neighbourhood // Most of these resources are geographically specific to the Greater Western Sydney area which is situated in the Commonwealth Electoral Division of Lindsay. When teaching, it is imperative that teachers provide students with localised knowledge to ensure that learning in HSIE (and in other curriculum areas) is relevant, meaningful and relatable for students. For this reason, I have chosen resources that are specific to Greater Western Sydney because this is where I live; where I have completed all of my professional experience; and is the area in which I hope to teach in the coming years.
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Dharag Language Resource

Dharag Language Resource | EDUP3002 - ES1: 'Recognisable differences between languages spoken in their neighbourhood' | Scoop.it
Dharug for Darug - Sydney Aboriginal Language Site - Dharug dalang
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Dharag Language Resource


Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander perspectives need to be embedded across the curriculum and taught in holistic and culturally appropriate manner so as to ensure that students develop a contextualised and  meaningful understanding of the diversity and uniqueness of Indigenous cultures (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, pp.  387-388). It is recommended that studies of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander perspectives be localised; meaning that teaching and learning should be done in consultation with, and focus on, the local Indigenous community (Board of Studies NSW, 2008, p. 14). Localised learning in this way is meaningful for students and at the same time it demonstrates the diversity of experiences of Indigenous peoples and communities (Board of Studies NSW, 2008, p. 14). For this reason, I have chosen the ‘Dharug Dalang’ resource because the Greater Western Sydney region is situated on Dharug land.

 

Dharug Dalang is a website that explores the Dharug language using written words, audio and visuals. The site’s most impressive features include an interactive homepage which allows the user to listen to numerous Dharug words alongside a pictorial representation of the word, and a word list containing hundreds of Dharug words (most of which are linked to an audio accompaniment) and their English translation.

 

Using the selection criteria outlined in the Aboriginal Education K-12 Resource Guide I believe that this resource is suitable for use in a Primary classroom (NSW Department of Education and Training [NSW DET], 2003, pp. 15-17). Importantly, the website was created by local Dharug man, Uncle Richard Green in collaboration with the University of New South Wales and CITIES (Centre for Indigenous Technology - Information and Engineering Solutions). The website touches on the  diversity of the Aboriginal peoples and cultures through its discussion of different language groups in the ‘language’ tab. Use of the website in conjunction an Aboriginal Languages Map and class discussions pertaining to the different Nations and language groups would further highlight the diversity of Aboriginal peoples and cultures. Due to the website’s authenticity, accuracy and Indigenous support I feel that this would be an appropriate resource to use in the Primary classroom, particularly when used in conjunction with other suitable resources and in collaboration with the local Dharug community (NSW DET, 2003, p. 17).

 

References:

Board of Studies NSW. (2008). Working with Aboriginal communities: a guide to community consultation and protocols. Sydney: Author.

 

Gilbert, R., & Hoepper, B. (E.d.). (2011). Teaching society and its environmentSouth Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia.


New South Wales Department of Education and Training. (2003). Aboriginal Education k-12 resource guide. Sydney: Author.


New South Wales Department of Education and Training. (2003). Quality teaching in NSW public schools. Sydney: Professional Support and Curriculum Directorate.

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'The Very Cranky Bear' Auslan version - YouTube

THE VERY CRANKY BEAR by Nick Bland, 2008 Text and illustration copyright ©Nick Bland, 2008 First published by Scholastic Press, an imprint of Scholastic Aust...
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AUSLAN  story video

 

Although not technically a spoken language, sign language is a method of communicating which involves the use of hand gestures and facial expressions to convey information. This resource is a video reading of the story The Very Cranky Bear by Nick Bland in both spoken English and Auslan; the sign language of Australia. Whilst the story alone is both engaging and appropriate for ES1, the video opens up many opportunities to explore languages, similarities, and differences; key ideas that underpin the Cultures strand in ES1 HSIE.

 

Discussion points from the video that are specific to the outcome CUES1, may include:

  • The similarities we share as people e.g. “we all communicate using a language” (Board of Studies, 2006, p. 26), we share stories, we all have needs etc.
  • Some of the differences between people e.g. people communicate in different ways, we may access information (such as stories) in a variety of ways etc.

 

Ideally, in a classroom this video and its accompanying book would be utilised and explored in ways that are not bound by a single KLA, meaning that this resource would be used not just in HSIE, but in other subjects such as English, PDHPE, Creative Arts etc. Kerry argues that limiting the exploration of a problem, idea, or resource to a single subject discipline only gives students a partial insight to the particular topic (2011 as cited in Kelly, 2012, p. 6). For a more comprehensive and meaningful learning experience, she recommends that teachers use authentic cross-curricular links that enable students to develop their understandings by drawing together insights from different subjects (Kerry, 2011, as cited in Kelly, 2012, p. 6). An example of how this resource can be used beyond HSIE is by doing an Adjective Detective re-read of the text. After exploring the text in some detail (whether it be in HSIE, English or another KLA) the teacher does a modelled reading of part of the story, during which, the students have to find all of the adjectives. Throughout the reading, students touch their nose when they find an adjective, prompting the teacher to respond by asking the students questions such as “which adjective did you find?”, “How do you know it’s an adjective?” etc. The adjectives could then be written on the board to form a word bank which could form the basis for a subsequent literacy lesson. This simple literacy strategy can be used to form the foundation for writing a literary description.

 

* Note that this activity would be done after a lesson introduction that revised what adjectives are, their purposes etc.

 

References:


Board of Studies NSW. (2006). Human Society & its environment. Sydney: Author.


Kelly, L. (2012). Why use a cross-curricula approach to teaching and learning? (pp. 1-12). London: Open University Press.

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Our Neighbourhood

Our Neighbourhood | EDUP3002 - ES1: 'Recognisable differences between languages spoken in their neighbourhood' | Scoop.it

A demonstration of an interactive map of places throughout my neighbourhood that are culturally and linguistically diverse.

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Zee Maps: Our Neighbourhood

 

Maps, globes and models are excellent classroom resources because they portray a vast amount of information and present students with opportunities to explore the world around them (Marsh, 2010, p. 241). The Zee Maps website allows users to create interactive maps which can be embellished by adding images, videos and/or audio.

 

Whilst ‘maps’ are typically used in the Environments strand of HSIE (Board of Studies, 2006, p. 47), this resource provides opportunities for teachers to link Cultures content to the local environment through visually depicting the cultural and linguistic diversity of the local community. An example of how this could practically work in a classroom could be to map parks, streets, restaurants, shops etc that have a linguistically diverse (not entirely English) name. Ideally, in older years a homework task could involve students finding one local ‘place’ with a non-English name and recording it by taking a photo, recording its name and location, or collecting a pamphlet/take away menu from the ‘place’. In ES1, the teacher could take on this role by finding several linguistically diverse ‘places’ and pinning them on an interactive Zee Map prior to the lesson (the link embedded in this scoop is an example I created). The lesson would involve discussions about the linguistically diverse words and their origins, meanings, similarities to English words etc.


References:


Board of Studies NSW. (2006). Human Society & its environment. Sydney: Author.


Marsh, C. (2010). Becoming a teacher: Knowledge, skills and issues. French's Forest: Pearson.

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One Globe Kids – children’s stories from around the world

One Globe Kids – children’s stories from around the world | EDUP3002 - ES1: 'Recognisable differences between languages spoken in their neighbourhood' | Scoop.it

'One Globe Kids' App

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One Globe Kids: App

The One Globe Kids App is an interactive application which is accessible on Ipads, Ipods, Iphones and on the web. The program documents the everyday stories of several children from different countries all over the world. The app has many features including:

  • My ‘[country]’ which is structured as ‘a day in the life of…’. This feature allows the user to explore the child’s daily routine through pictures, written words and an audio accompaniment. Through emphasising the similarities of daily practices and observing children in familiar settings such as home and school, students are able to identify with the children and their stories (AusAID, 2011, p. 9). The language used is a combination of English and the child’s (native) language, for instance Aji from Indonesia speaks partly in Indonesian (with an English translation) and in English.
  • Counting in (the child’s) language: sequenced numbers are displayed with an audio function and the option for students to record their own voices counting in the given language. This numeracy element also provides students with the opportunity to revise their counting skills in a unique and engaging way.
  • “Tell Me About Yourself”: an interactive feature in which students hear about the child’s daily routines and can then respond to questions about their own daily routines. Their responses are recorded which enables the students to view their stories alongside each other, highlighting both similarities and differences and enabling students to develop a sense of shared identity with others from across the world (AusAID, 2011, pp. 9, 13).

 

A class discussion and joint construction of a Venn Diagram could form the basis of an appropriate assessment strategy for the CUES1 indicator “talks about the characteristics that we all share (Board of Studies, 2006, p. 26). In the classroom this could involve having a large Venn Diagram displayed on an Interactive White Board or drawn on butchers paper. The divided sections of the diagram are labelled ‘Me’ in one circle and ‘(the child’s name [from the app])’ in the other circle. Open-ended teacher initiated questions relating languages spoken, transport taken to school, weekend activities etc., help to promote student discussion about the similarities and differences between the students’ lives and ‘the child’s’. Answers from the whole-class discussion are recorded on the appropriate sections of the Venn Diagram; students’ routines/activities/characteristics are recorded in the ‘Me’ section; the ‘child’s’ routines/activities/characteristics recorded in the opposite circle; and the overlapping section is filled with the similarities shared by both the students and the child. The diagram acts as a visual representation of the commonalities and differences children share. In regards to assessment, the dialogue from the whole-class discussion and the filled in diagram can be used as an assessment for learning. Known as formative assessment, this approach is beneficial because it allows the teacher to determine where students are in relation to where they should be; providing the teacher with information they need to adjust future teaching and learning experiences (Ruiz-Primo, 2011, p. 23).

 

* Teaching note: The Venn Diagram, being an abstract representation of information may not be suitable for all ES1 classes depending on their experiences and/or development. A T-Chart is a suitable alternative that can be used in place of the Venn Diagram.


References:

AusAID. (2011). Global perspectives: a framework for global education in Australian schools. Carlton: Education Services Australia.

 

Ruiz-Primo, M. (2011). Informal formative assessment: The role of instructional dialogues in assessing students’ learning. Studies in Educational Evaluation, 37, 15-24.

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"Hello to All the Children of the World" - YouTube

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“Hello to All the Children of the World” Video


This resource introduces students to the concept of diversity through a very simple and accessible medium – song. The song features children singing the word hello in many languages with a chorus that emphasises the similarities between children across the world. Students could learn this song as part of a unit of work on cultures in HSIE.

 

To make learning significant and meaningful for students, the Quality Teaching Framework recommends that teachers link experiences at school to the “social, demographic and cultural backgrounds of students, families and the local community” (NSW Department of Education and Training [NSW DET], 2003, p.14). With this in mind, a lesson that introduces the song could begin with a discussion about the different types of greetings that students use with their family and friends. Such a discussion opens up the opportunity to talk about the different languages that students may speak at home and/or may have heard within their neighbourhood.

 

*Note: this song features many languages that are prevalent within the Greater Western Sydney area such as Arabic, Italian and Hindi (Australian Bureau of Statistics, 2013). Hearing and discussing these recognisable languages could further enhance the connection between school content and students’ experiences at home and/or in the community.


References:

New South Wales Department of Education and Training. (2003). Quality teaching in NSW public schools. Sydney: Professional Support and Curriculum Directorate.

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