Educational Technology: Leaders and Leadership
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How to solve the great edtech challenge | Pearson Blog

How to solve the great edtech challenge | Pearson Blog | Educational Technology: Leaders and Leadership | Scoop.it

It is very inspiring to have the privilege of spending some time with so many talented and committed people from so many countries all around the world – all focused on tackling one of the biggest challenges facing our societies and our economies. We may all describe that challenge a little differently but we all know what it is – can we apply technology to help us double the amount of really deep, high value learning in our societies at no greater cost?

That’s the challenge that all of us in education face, isn’t it? How can we do more – and better – and most often do it with less?

The doubling part may seem a little ambitious, but consider this. In most countries that participate in PISA – and I’d be pretty confident this applies to all those that don’t, too – if you could get all schools, with similar social demographics, even close to the highest performing comparable ones, you would comfortably achieve that goal of doubling learning outcomes. And, that, I think, is the challenge to all of us – how can technology help us to replicate educational excellence at scale? For, even in the most difficult of circumstances, it is relatively easy to find a good school or great teaching. The hard part is scaling that success across the whole school or the entire system. So, in the next few minutes, I want to try to synthesize an argument – to draw together a number of threads – that all of us are grappling with, in varying forms, around the world.

1. All members of our global society now require a higher level of educational attainment – a deeper learning – than at any point in human history.

2. That for all the great energy, investment and innovation – so much of which is on display at this event – we are not, yet, really, applying technology to meet that challenge effectively – certainly not consistently or at anything like global scale.

3. We can do it – and in some places, we are doing it. And it happens most often through some form of blended learning – where teachers, students and data work together to create an active learning environment.

4. For us to do it consistently, and at scale, requires all of us – governments, education authorities, educators, learners, their parents, learning companies like Pearson, global technology companies like Microsoft, edtech startups, not for profits, everybody involved – to rally around an agreed framework and a common purpose.

That framework, as Canadian educational researcher Michael Fullan and others argue, requires us to combine three trends that have emerged independently in education over the last forty years and which desperately need each other – technology, a new pedagogy, and systemic reform; and then to measure everything in terms of its efficacy – whether the learning activity really doesenable us to achieve greater outcomes and a better return on our investment.

So, let’s start by agreeing how important it is that we meet this challenge.

In the 20th century we expected school systems to sort people – those who would go to university and those who wouldn’t; those who would do professional jobs; and those who would fill the semi-skilled and unskilled jobs for which minimal learning, more foundational skills, was required. In the 21st century, this isn’t good enough – morally, socially or economically. All young people need to be able to learn, to create and to do – to know important things and to be able to apply what they know in ways that are engaging and solve real-life problems.

And what’s striking from all the research into the highest performing school systems – in Singapore and Shanghai, for example – is that they do have high expectations for all their students. No excuses, no rationale for failure, but detailed strategies and plans to ensure all young people succeed.

What makes this more important than ever is that we are now in a second machine age, in which we all need to use our minds, our mental and our emotional intelligence, far more effectively. And the economic and social stakes are very high indeed. In the world’s richest country, the United States, we know that the median hourly wage of workers who can make complex inferences and evaluate subtle truths in written texts is 60 percent higher than the workers who can, at best, read relatively short texts to locate a single piece of information. And, in the world’s poorest countries, the stakes are even more fundamental – a child born to a mother who can read is 50 percent more likely to live beyond the age of five.

So, our first point is that all young people now need the thinking skills, such as how you apply literacy, numeracy and scientific knowledge. They all need intrapersonal skills, like determination, a sense of responsibility and self-worth. And they also all need the interpersonalskills – to communicate, work collaboratively, and problem solve.

This leads directly to our second point, which we all know: technology is disrupting, to use the phrase of the moment, pretty much every other activity and industry. It is transforming the way children and young people play, access information, communicate with each other and learn – and yet so far it has largely failed to transform most schools or universities or most teaching and learning in many classrooms and lecture halls. We are failing to engage many young people. Research by academics at the MIT Media Lab, for example, suggests that students’ brain activity is nearly non-existent during lectures. As professor Eric Mazur of Harvard University’s Physics department puts it, “students are more asleep in lectures than they are in bed!”  Studies from many countries show that less than 40 percent of upper secondary students are intellectually engaged at school.

And we are also failing to apply technology – consistently or at anything like sufficient scale – to improve learning outcomes. John Hattie, professor of education and director of the Melbourne Education Research Institute found, in his meta analysis, a lower than average impact of technology on learning outcomes, relative to other teaching and learning strategies. Larry Cuban, too, has documented that technology has had little impact on learning outcomes over the last fifty years – as have a growing number of other studies.

Why is this the case? Perhaps it is because, as Andreas Schliecher of the OECD, puts it: “Technology can leverage great teaching; technology can’t displace poor teaching”

The research tells us that teachers are making basic uses of technology – to find information, practice routine skills, turn in homework; they are not – yet – using it to really analyse data or information, to collaborate with peers, to use simulations, animations and the like. At least, it is not yet happening systematically or at real scale.

Now, my Dad was a teacher, and then a head teacher, all his professional life. I never once heard him use the phrase ‘personalised learning’. And if he was alive today, and I started to lecture him on the power of big data to transform learning outcomes, then I know he would look at me with some surprise and no little skepticism. But he did talk about how, in a class of thirty kids, a teacher has to find ways to engage with each of them in their own way and on their terms. Or how, in a school of hundreds of kids, it was often very hard to see the patterns – or make the connections – as to why some classes were powering ahead in some subjects or even in mastering and applying some concepts and skills but were struggling with others. And how, as the head teacher, he owed it to every child in the school, to every teacher, to draw those patterns and make those connections. He also talked about how local education authorities find it really hard to help schools to share data and expertise, best practice and insights, in ways that enabled them to do what you would take for granted in pretty much any other sphere of life: replicating excellence at scale.

I’m sure many of you would recognise the same trends. The good news, of course – our third point – is that technology is now helping us to do all these things.

In classrooms as far apart as Denmark, Canada, England, Australia, Colombia and California and many other places, teachers are deploying technology to overcome the boredom of their students and their own professional frustration. They are developing a new pedagogy, which combines learning outcomes such as literacy and numeracy with less well defined outcomes such as problem-solving, collaboration, creativity, thinking in different ways, building effective relationships and teams. As Andreas Schliecher was arguing to me earlier this week, applying technology to really hone – often over some years and always with great rigour – and then share widely the very best pedagogic approaches is something all high performing school systems around the world do really well.

And, as I know from Pearson’s own experiences, in supporting the digital learning of 70 million users around the world, we do now have the ability to make a profound impact on practice at the student, institutional, and system-wide level in education. Whether that is, for example automating the marking of homework; reducing the time, friction and cost of teaching; supporting community colleges in America to make very significant learning gains in algebra and physics and many other subjects; or teaching a generation of young Chinese professionals – the masters of “silent English” as they are often known, with top marks in grammar and vocabulary – the speaking and listening skills they need to prosper in their careers.

What’s common in all these cases – and I would bet from each of your own experiences – is that technology and big data is effective when it combines with the new pedagogies – the very best teaching practices – and is applied to drive systemic change at real scale.

So our fourth point is we need an agreed and widely applied framework that combines these three trends to deliver, around the world, far greater learning outcomes at no greater cost. As you all know, this is not as easy as it sounds. Technology entrepreneurs will find it much easier to develop digital innovations than to grapple with pedagogical considerations. Likewise, educators may grasp the new pedagogy but often struggle to design, or specify, next generation products that are irresistibly engaging and intuitive to use for digital natives. And global technology and services companies often find schools and colleges to be difficult and ‘messy’ environments in which to deploy. As the largest learning company in the world, we, like all of you, grapple with these problems every day.

Today, we primarily provide inputs into the process of education, such as a textbook, an assessment, a learning technology or platform, a course, a qualification, a high-stakes test or professional development for teachers. We put all of those ‘inputs’ in the hands of an educational leader, an experienced teacher or an enthusiastic student, and off they go. We are rarely able to predict or measure the learning outcomes that this investment of time and resource will produce. We need to change that – and, indeed, over the last decade, powered by technology, we have started to change that, with very encouraging results. But we now need to do that, in a much more systematic way, across our whole company.

So we are making some big changes right across Pearson. Every action, every decision, every process, every investment we now make is driven by an Efficacy Framework that requires us to be able to answer four key questions: What learning outcome do you aim to achieve? What evidence – what data – will you collect to measure progress? Do you have a clear plan that gives us confidence you can implement effectively? And, as we’ll always be working in partnership with other stakeholders, do we, collectively, have the capacity to deliver the desired outcome?

We stress that we are on the path to efficacy – and that our guide is incomplete. But we are committed to provide audited learning outcomes data for all our products and services by 2018. And we look forward to working with all of you to achieve our goals.

This brings me to our final point – that shared sense of purpose. As the authors of a new book put it, this second machine age does have its limitations:

“We have yet to see a truly creative computer, or an innovative or entrepreneurial one. Nor have we seen a piece of digital gear that could unite people behind a common cause, or comfort a sick child, care for a frail or injured person…or repair a bridge or a furnace.”

It is learning that gives humans the capacity to do all these things. And the brightest future of education lies in enabling teachers to do far more effectively and on a far greater scale what the best of them have always done – being an agent of change and progression. Over the years, there’s been much glib talk about how technology would “flip” the classroom, transforming the teachers’ role from being the “sage on the stage” to the “guide on the side.” The data and the research tell us different. Technology is just a tool; a very powerful one, but a tool all the same. And it is at its most powerful in the hands of a teacher and her or his students, enabling them to learn from each other and do much more effectively what the best of them do each day and always have done – lighting that spark, making that connection, that unlocks a world of opportunity for their students.

And so if we can combine disruptive technology, new pedagogy and systemic change effectively, we really can aspire to achieve far greater learning outcomes – yes, even to double them – to the benefit of far more of our fellow citizens, all around the world. It does require all of us to rally around a common purpose* – but I can’t think of a better one, or one that is more widely shared than this: Applying technology to help far more of our fellow citizens to make progress in their lives through learning.

***

* This need for collaboration is the reason we created our Catalyst accelerator programme, via which we’re working with bright startups to develop next generation edtech products. We’re inviting applications for the second cohort now; should you know any great startups, send them in the direction of catalyst.pearson.com. 

Gordon Dahlby's insight:

March 14 blob.pearson.com

 

Not a fan of "solve" 

Not sure why "How can we do more – and better – and most often do it with less?"  has to add "with less."  Education leave a lot of opportunity and value on the shelf every year.

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Educational Technology: Leaders and Leadership
Leaders, Leadership and Best Practice in K-20 Educational Techonology
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Deconstructing the development mindset | SmartBrief

Deconstructing the development mindset | SmartBrief | Educational Technology: Leaders and Leadership | Scoop.it
Since Peter Senge coined the expression "learning organization" more than two decades ago, businesses around the world have aspired to leverage learning toward agility, transformation and long-term success. And most leaders will admit that they still struggle to make this dream a reality.
But what if we reframe the conversation? What if we shift the focus from the organization to the individual? Because learning organizations are the result of individuals who possess a deeply held learning orientation and a commitment to growth. Learning organizations are the result of a workforce that shares a development mindset.
Defining "development mindset"

A development mindset is a pattern of thinking and a way of looking at the world that invites ongoing opportunities for continuous individual and organizational transformation. It’s an abundant perspective that recognizes significance that others might overlook.
Those with a development mindset appreciate that development is a state of mind, not a series of discrete activities or classes. They tend to:
Assume that they are capable of learning and growing throughout their entire careers.
Expect that there is something to be learned from nearly all experiences.
Believe that experimentation and failure are powerful, necessary and productive parts of the learning process.
Take responsibility, initiative and ownership for their ongoing growth.
Commit to helping others reach their potential.
Value feedback as helpful information to fuel improvement.
Appreciate that development is not a "one and done" activity but rather a perpetual cycle of learning, application, practice, reflection, and refinement.
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Guide to Choosing Digital Content and Curriculum

Guide to Choosing Digital Content and Curriculum | Educational Technology: Leaders and Leadership | Scoop.it
Working in collaboration with the Consortium for School Networking (CoSN) and the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE), the Center for Digital Education produced this Guide to Choosing Digital Content and Curriculum to help districts address some of the challenges of moving from a print-based to a digital-based curriculum. It provides context, effective practices and resources for districts, and presents case studies of districts already implementing digital content or setting up the infrastructure to do so. We hope you find it useful and informative as you begin or continue implementing digital content and curriculum.
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PRTG Network Monitor Unifies Management Tools on Single Platform

PRTG Network Monitor Unifies Management Tools on Single Platform | Educational Technology: Leaders and Leadership | Scoop.it
Network monitoring has to be one of the most thankless jobs in IT. After all, network monitoring can be a tedious, time-consuming process, using multiple management products often integrated poorly or not at all. That means network managers may not trust the data reports, alerts and action results they are getting. Paessler aims to change the negative perception of many of the currently available tools with PRTG Network Monitor 16, the latest version of the technology. PRTG promises to unify network monitoring into a single management platform that can execute automated actions based on administrator-defined policies. What's more, PRTG offers extensive support for all the common network discovery and traffic-reporting capabilities in use by most network devices today. The product also offers hundreds of sensors fine-tuned to work with popular network products to make sure no important information falls through the cracks. Administrators also will appreciate the ease of creating custom sensors to work with devices not normally covered in the mix. The product's capabilities extend to the forthcoming deluge of Internet of things devices, which are sure to make network management even more complicated.
Gordon Dahlby's insight:
not a recommendation
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2 Leadership Models Link Technology, Academics and Instruction

2 Leadership Models Link Technology, Academics and Instruction | Educational Technology: Leaders and Leadership | Scoop.it
Miami-Dade and Arlington school districts have created very different but successful organizational structures that enhance decision-making between superintendents, chief academic officers and chief information officers.
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13 Steps to Shape & Secure Your 1:1 Chromebook Program

13 Steps to Shape & Secure Your 1:1 Chromebook Program | Educational Technology: Leaders and Leadership | Scoop.it
The following tips will help maximize the online safety and productivity of your students.  We will demystify the Google Apps for Education Admin Console, providing you with the tools to successfully optimize your school’s 1:1 program and edtech experience.  Taken from Best Practices to Shape & Secure Your 1:1 Program for Chromebooks.

The Google Apps cloud-based policy, simplified:

Device Settings (Steps 1-3)
User Settings (Steps 4-13)
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Designing and Creating Maker Spaces

Designing and Creating Maker Spaces | Educational Technology: Leaders and Leadership | Scoop.it

Designing and Creating Maker Spaces


Most educators think robotics, 3D printing and construction when they envision maker spaces, so how does this concept fit into the curriculum? By using design thinking as a framework for instruction, we will explore the possibilities for students to engage in empathy, seek new problems to solve, then prototype and test their solutions. When students start to create material for a larger audience, they ultimately need a way to make their ideas into physical realities. We will look at the pedagogy and the process to help make this happen. Topics included: Discussion of the pedagogy behind the evolution of maker spaces Examples of maker spaces from around the world Ideas for how you can bring design thinking and making into any curriculum You can also attend one of the EdTech Teacher Summer Workshops taking place in seven cities across the United States to learn from Beth and Douglas in person. Visit ettsummer.org/#Workshops to find out how to get involved. beth holland Beth Holland combines over 17 years of experience in mobile learning, K–12 education and differentiated instruction to help teachers create innovative learning environments. She blogs regularly for Edutopia and EdTech Researcher at Education Week, presents nationally and internationally, and is an authorized Google Education Trainer. Beth holds a master’s degree from Harvard University and a bachelor’s degree from Northwestern University. In addition to being an EdTech Teacher instructor, she is a doctoral student at Johns Hopkins University. doug kiangDouglas Kiang is a dynamic speaker, teacher and workshop presenter with over 20 years of teaching experience in independent schools at every grade level. He currently teaches computer science and heads the technology resource teachers group at Punahou School in Honolulu, Hawaii. Douglas holds a master’s degree in technology, innovation and education from Harvard and is an Apple Distinguished Educator as well as an authorized Google Education Trainer. He is the author of five bestselling game strategy guides, and his latest book on Minecraft in Education is soon to be published by Peachpit Press. 


 WATCH THE WEBINAR RECORDING

https://www.anymeeting.com/355-979-664/E953DD86844D39


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Even Apple is acknowledging that the “iPads in education” fad is coming to an end

Even Apple is acknowledging that the “iPads in education” fad is coming to an end | Educational Technology: Leaders and Leadership | Scoop.it
These were the findings from a survey of high school students and teachers in a district in the US state of Maine on how effective iPads were for learning and teaching. Almost 90% of teachers and 74% of students preferred laptops over tablets, according to the Lewiston-Auburn Sun Journal.
Even Apple has bent to the will of students and teachers. Following the poll, the tech giant and Maine’s Department of Education are now offering schools in the state the chance to trade in iPads ordered in 2013 for new MacBook Air laptops, at no additional cost.
“If we had known how big a transition it would have been [to switch] from laptops to iPads we would have proactively done some good work with teachers to make the transition easier for them,” Mike Muir, the policy director of the Maine Learning Through Technology Initiative, told Quartz.
Gordon Dahlby's insight:
A lesson on pilots with a robust evaluation components that include students and parents as well as classroom teachers.  Evaluation process links to project goals.  It's not Texas-hold 'em like to go 'all in."

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ERIC EJ873675: Educational Outcomes and Research from 1:1 Computing Settings : 

ERIC EJ873675: Educational Outcomes and Research from 1:1 Computing Settings :  | Educational Technology: Leaders and Leadership | Scoop.it
Despite the growing interest in 1:1 computing initiatives, relatively little empirical research has focused on the outcomes of these investments. Th
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Grow2Gig+: Anchors Advance Communities

Grow2Gig+: Anchors Advance Communities | Educational Technology: Leaders and Leadership | Scoop.it
Connecting Anchor Institutions: A Broadband Action Plan

Connecting Anchor Institutions: Broadband Action Plan was developed by the Schools, Health & Libraries Broadband (SHLB) Coalition to provide ideas and actionable policy recommendations to address the broadband needs of schools, libraries, health facilities, and all other anchor institutions. It highlights these needs, discusses the gaps in Community Anchor Institution (CAI) broadband connectivity, explains why affordable, high-capacity broadband for anchor institutions is vitally important to the health and prosperity of communities nationwide, and recommends actions that federal, state and local policymakers can take to improve anchor institutions’ broadband connectivity. Community access to affordable next generation broadband is an attainable goal, but only if we reach together.  Help us #Grow2Gig+.

 

A Vision of Our Future

The future belongs to those who are connected to high-capacity broadband. Accordingly, SHLB's Grow2Gig+ Campaign begins with a vision of that connected future. By connecting Community Anchor Institutions to high-speed broadband, we have the power to bring together people and communities across the U.S.
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New 'Map' Connects Ed-Tech Developers, Schools With Academic Research - Market Brief

New 'Map' Connects Ed-Tech Developers, Schools With Academic Research - Market Brief | Educational Technology: Leaders and Leadership | Scoop.it
An interactive, online platform from Digital Promise gives K-12 companies a way to filter and search for academic research relevant to their products.
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One-to-One Laptop Initiatives Boost Student Scores, Researchers Find

One-to-One Laptop Initiatives Boost Student Scores, Researchers Find | Educational Technology: Leaders and Leadership | Scoop.it
By Leo Doran and Benjamin Herold

Efforts by K-12 schools to give every student a laptop computer increased student achievement and gave a modest boost to their "21st century skills," according to a first-of-its-kind meta-analysis of 15 years' worth of research studies.

"It's not like just providing a laptop to every student will automatically increase student achievement, but we find that it's the first step," said Binbin Zheng, an assistant professor of counseling, educational psychology, and special education at Michigan State University.

Using statistical techniques to analyze already-completed studies, Zheng and her colleagues found that 1-to-1 laptop programs on average had a statistically significant positive impact on student test scores in English/language arts, writing, math and science. The limited number of rigorous quantitative studies available to analyze mean that those findings are not definitive, but they are clearly a good sign for 1-to-1 proponents and underscore the need for more study, Zheng said.

A further review of 86 additional papers by the researchers, meanwhile, found some modest evidence of other positive benefits associated with giving laptops to students, including increased student technology use; more student-centered and project-based instruction; greater student engagement; and better relationships between students and teachers.

The analysis focused solely on 1-to-1 laptop efforts. The researchers cautioned that their results are not generalizable to other devices such as tablets, desktop computers, and smartphones.  
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CoSN launches new Trusted Learning Environment Seal for K12

CoSN launches new "Trusted Learning Environment" (TLE) Seal Program website. The website will serve as a student data privacy tool for school districts, educators, parents, and the community, as well as the starting point for school districts to apply for the Seal.



Why is TLE Important
Data show that a large majority of parents are concerned about the privacy and security of their students and student data. Earning the TLE Seal indicates that a school system has taken measurable steps to implement strong practices to ensure the privacy of student data.

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30 Under 30 2016: The Year's Leaders Who Are Unleashing Learning For All - Forbes

30 Under 30 2016: The Year's Leaders Who Are Unleashing Learning For All - Forbes | Educational Technology: Leaders and Leadership | Scoop.it
We shouldn’t need hot-button issues like the deeply flawed college admissions race, DREAM Act and emerging landscape of K-12 digital learning to remind us that educational opportunities matters — to all of us. Luckily, it’s self-evident to the women and men who earned a spot on the 2016 Forbes 30 Under 30 in Education.

Their spirit of innovating in education is deeply original. They range from edtech entrepreneurs such as literacy champions Matthew Ramirez, cofounder of WriteLab, and Quill’s cofounder Peter Gault, and Rebecca Liebman, whose LearnLux focuses on financial literacy. Zaption’s Charlie Stigler has trained his focus on video learning as a dynamic teaching tool. Cassandra Tognoni of BookReport uses data to help districts figure out best practices for spending and saving, and Christopher Pedregal has $7.5 million in funding to crowdsource learning to Socratic’s 8.5 million customers.

Increased access to learning for all startups are prominent in this year’s list. Heejae Lim, founder of Talking Points, built an app that bridges the language barrier between teachers and non-English speaking parents, while Sarahi Espinoza Salamonca’s app helps undocumented students find money to go to college. Chelsey Roebuck, cofounder of Emerging Leaders in Technology and Engineering (ELiTE), left the consulting fast track to increase job opportunities minorities underrepresented in STEM fields.

SEE THE FULL LIST: FORBES 30 Under 30 Class of 2016
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Baltimore County Measures the Impact of Technology Initiatives | LFA: Join The Conversation - Public School Insights

Baltimore County Measures the Impact of Technology Initiatives | LFA: Join The Conversation - Public School Insights | Educational Technology: Leaders and Leadership | Scoop.it
Using technology in meaningful ways is as essential to today’s teaching and learning as reading, writing, and arithmetic. Stakeholders from around Baltimore County understood this urgency and prioritized graduating every student globally competitive in our Blueprint 2.0 strategic plan. Our theory of action leverages technology in two ways—through equitable access for every student to an effective digital learning environment and second language proficiency. The bold initiatives that are transforming our schools are S.T.A.T., or Students and Teachers Accessing Tomorrow, and the Passport Program for elementary world language instruction.

S.T.A.T. is creating new opportunities for personalization, customization, and engagement guided by digital curriculum more focused on critical thinking and analytical skills. Additional components include the BCPS One digital ecosystem for easy educator and family access to student information and learning resources, 1:1 devices, and wireless and broadband at public schools and libraries. School-embedded instructional coaches known as S.T.A.T. teachers tailor professional development to school needs to facilitate learner-centered environments where students actively choose how to meet objectives and how to demonstrate what they know and can do.

Digital learning is also essential to Passport, which supplements weekly conversational Spanish lessons with an interactive, online program designed for children. Through BCPS One, students have anytime, anywhere access to the program for practicing speaking and listening.

Ongoing investments and support from the community known as Team BCPS are critical to bringing these changes in instruction and infrastructure to nearly 112,000 students. To provide this support, our stakeholders—from families to staff, residents, and decision makers—need to know how these programs are contributing to the future of our students, schools, and county.
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School desktop disruption

School desktop disruption | Educational Technology: Leaders and Leadership | Scoop.it
concept of “going virtual” has been gaining traction in the IT world for years, beginning in data centers with server virtualization.

Today, school district CIOs who have taken the next step—the virtualization of desktop computers—see a new range of benefits, including increased flexibility for users, cost savings, stronger security, and more frequent updates of hardware and software.

Virtualization technology moves a user’s desktop and associated software into the cloud so the environment can be accessed from any physical computer.
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eBook - DNS User Guide || Catchpoint Systems

eBook - DNS User Guide || Catchpoint Systems | Educational Technology: Leaders and Leadership | Scoop.it
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Jenne's curator insight, June 24, 3:28 AM
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Federal court upholds FCC's net neutrality rules

Federal court upholds FCC's net neutrality rules | Educational Technology: Leaders and Leadership | Scoop.it
The Federal Communications Commission's net neutrality rules remain in effect with backing in federal courts -- for now, at least.

Opponents of the FCC's rules for the Open Internet, or net neutrality, plan to take their challenge to the Supreme Court.  "We have always expected this issue to be decided by the Supreme Court, and we look forward to participating in that appeal," said AT&T General Counsel David McAtee in a statement after the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit ruled 2-1 Tuesday in favor of the FCC's rules.

AT&T was among many companies and groups that filed a suit in 2015 challenging the rules. Its was among several cases consolidated into originating cases filled by USTelecom, a trade association that counts among its members AT&T and Verizon, and Alamo Broadband, a fixed wireless broadband service in the San Antonio, Tex. area.
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How hackers held a district hostage for almost $10,000

How hackers held a district hostage for almost $10,000 | Educational Technology: Leaders and Leadership | Scoop.it
Think ransoms are only paid out to rescue victims of kidnappings? Think again.
Imagine walking into your office one morning and finding some (or all) of your district’s computer files “padlocked” and inaccessible. In the corner, a masked man is standing with his hand out, demanding an $8,000-$10,000 ransom payment. When he gets the money, he’ll hand over the key to the padlock. If you choose not to pay, then you’ll spend the next few months trying to pick the lock while teachers, students, and administrators are forced to work without their modern technology.

This is essentially what happened to Horry County Schools (HCS) of Conway, S.C., earlier this year. Using a type of malicious software designed to block access to a computer system until a sum of money is paid (aka, “ransomware”), on February 8 hackers used high-level encryption to lock up the district’s data. The criminals then held that data for ransom and demanded the district pay nearly $10,000 via Bitcoin for the encryption key.

Charles Hucks, executive director of technology, says the district had experienced a few breaches during the months leading up to the attack, but nothing of this magnitude. “A few devices of teachers were hit and some of their local files were encrypted,” says Hucks. “In some cases network-based files on individual directories were also encrypted, but the impact of those attacks was very limited. They were isolated incidents.”

Attacks are on the rise
Ransomware attacks are on the rise. According to a recent PhishMe analysis of phishing email campaigns (i.e., a deceptive attempt to pose as a reputable entity via email), during the first three months of 2016 there were 6.3 million more phishing attacks than there were during the same period last year. This represents a 789% increase that’s primarily due to an upsurgence in ransomware.
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LEFT TO CHANCE:
U.S. Middle Schoolers Lack in-Depth Experience
With Technology and Engineering via @changeequation

Technology and engineering have played central roles in forming our national identity. We see the United States as a nation of tinkerers and inventors who have helped chart the course of global innovation for centuries. Only time will tell if we can continue to live up to this conception of ourselves. As technology and engineering come to affect almost every aspect of modern life, this is no small matter. New data from the first-ever Nation’s Report Card in Technology and Engineering Literacy (TEL) are not reassuring. Well less than half the nation’s eighth-graders are on track to become proficient in a set of skills they will need to thrive in society and the workplace. Low-income and minority youth lag farthest behind.1 On closer examination, these findings should not surprise us. Change the Equation’s analysis of survey data from TEL reveals that millions of American youth spend precious little time tinkering, troubleshooting, or doing the kinds of hands-on problem-solving that are at the heart of technology and engineering. Girls, minorities, and low-income students do least of all—dampening hopes to create a more diverse STEM workforce in future years. 
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Study Finds that 70-inch Display Unreadable By Half of Students

Radius Global Market Research has released findings from a recent study conducted that evaluated the readability of content displayed on a 70-inch flat panel in an average-sized classroom. According to the new research, 58 percent of students in an average classroom can’t read content displayed on a 70-inch flat panel.
The study was conducted with a sample group of 106 students ages 12-to-22 in groups of approximately 30 at a time. Students were asked to read typical education content including charts and text-based information displayed on a top-selling 70-inch flat panel in a traditional 30-foot-by-30-footclassroom, and then write down six short items of information from what they saw. The students sat in five rows 22-feet wide (six seats per row) with the first row approximately eight feet from the display, and the last row about 27 feet from the display.
The results indicated that, on average, 17 out of 30 students per classroom were not able to read the content on the 70-inch flat panel. Inability to read the content was defined as writing down at least one item incorrectly.
"The majority of students evaluated in the study clearly had difficulty reading the content displayed on the 70-inch flat panel,” said Shira Horn, vice president, Radius Global Market Research.
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Sir Ken Robinson - HundrEd.fi

Sir Ken Robinson - HundrEd.fi | Educational Technology: Leaders and Leadership | Scoop.it

Sir Ken works with governments and education systems, international agencies, Fortune 500 companies and leading cultural organisations around the world. He was knighted in 2003 for his services to the arts. 


What is HundrED? 


HundrED is designed to help Finland maintain it's reputation at the forefront of education. Over the next two years we will interview 100 global thought leaders, create 100 case studies of exciting education happenings worldwide, and trial 100 new innovations in schools in Finland over the course of one year. Our findings will be shared with the world for free.


Hear his thoughts on:

1. Skills 2. Teachers 3. Assessment 4. Environments 5. Leadership 7. Personal memory 8. The next 100 years

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Does learning improve when every student gets a laptop?

Does learning improve when every student gets a laptop? | Educational Technology: Leaders and Leadership | Scoop.it
Schools that provide each student with a laptop computer, as well as the appropriate support for both students and teachers, see significant improvement in academic achievement, a new paper indicates.

Michigan State University’s Binbin Zheng and colleagues analyzed years of studies on “one-to-one” laptop programs, including Zheng’s own research, and found that such programs that take a comprehensive approach were linked to higher test scores in English, math, science and writing, along with other benefits.

“In the past couple decades, one-to-one laptop programs have spread widely, but so has debate about whether they are cost-effective and beneficial to educational outcomes,” said Zheng, assistant professor of educational technology and lead author on the paper. “I believe this technology, if implemented correctly, is worth the cost and effort because it lifts student achievement, enhances engagement and enthusiasm among students, improves teacher-student relationships and promotes 21st century skills such as technological proficiency and problem solving.”
Gordon Dahlby's insight:
The limited number of rigorous quantitative studies available to analyze means that further analysis is warranted insight
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Bill Gates: Ed Tech Has Underachieved, But Better Days Are Ahead - Market Brief

Bill Gates: Ed Tech Has Underachieved, But Better Days Are Ahead - Market Brief | Educational Technology: Leaders and Leadership | Scoop.it
Education technology is still at its earliest stages and has yet to live up to its promise, philanthropist Bill Gates told an audience of thousands of ed-tech entrepreneurs and investors at the ASU GSV Summit here. “We really haven’t changed [students’ academic] outcomes,” he acknowledged.

But over the next decade, Gates predicted that the industry could move to a new level of quality as ed-tech providers begin to understand student and teacher needs. “We can surprise people by really making education better—both here in the United States and around the world,” he said.

“Our foundation’s going to do everything we can to help facilitate the creation of great technology,” he said, with a focus on three areas: effective personalized learning solutions, an evidence base that works, and adoption of proven technologies. “Our goal is to help innovators.”

Scaling Up Personalized Learning

Within the next five years, Gates expects most schools to be using personalized learning in at least one way, but it’s a shift that will require more than just technology. Even the layout of the classroom will look different, he said.
Gordon Dahlby's insight:
Seems to underestimate AI as applied to helping students learn. Who is working on Watson(R) in education space? 
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Digital Textbook Sales Surpassing Physical Sales | Edudemic

Digital Textbook Sales Surpassing Physical Sales | Edudemic | Educational Technology: Leaders and Leadership | Scoop.it
The time of college students lugging thick textbooks across campus may soon be coming to an end. Many of the top textbook publishers, including McGraw-Hill Education, are seeing their sales of digital products outpace print copies for the first time ever. As the balance shifts in favor of digital textbooks, 100% adoption of electronic text on campuses, in classrooms and across school districts may not be far off.

Big Publishers
In 2015, McGraw-Hill Education sold more units of digital learning material than physical copies of textbooks and other print products, InsideHigherEd reported. This is in line with McGraw-Hill’s 2014 sale breakdown where a greater percentage of revenue came from its digital products than print. McGraw-Hill offers a number of digital learning tools in addition to simple text e-books, including ALEKS, Connect, LearnSmart and SmartBooks, which also sold well in 2015.

Publishers don’t expect these numbers to be a flash in the pan. The trend is likely to continue in 2016 as early sales results come in, CEO and President of McGraw-Hill Education David Levin said in a statement.

“Our transition to providing digital products that offer better outcomes at meaningfully lower prices is going really well,” Levin explained. “In fact, as students returned to college in early 2016, they activated 1.2 million subscriptions to our Connect platform during January and February, a double-digit increase over the previous year.”
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Siri's creators say they've made something even better

Siri's creators say they've made something even better | Educational Technology: Leaders and Leadership | Scoop.it
The stealthy, four-year-old Viv is among the furthest along in an endeavour that many in Silicon Valley believe heralds that next big shift in computing — and digital commerce itself. Over the next five years, that transition will turn smartphones — and perhaps smart homes and cars and other devices — into virtual assistants with supercharged conversational capabilities, said Julie Ask, an expert in mobile commerce at Forrester.

Powered by artificial intelligence and unprecedented volumes of data, they could become the portal through which billions of people connect to every service and business on the internet. It's a world in which you can order a taxi, make a restaurant reservation and buy movie tickets in one long unbroken conversation — no more typing, searching or even clicking.

Viv, which will be publicly demonstrated for the first time at a major industry conference on Monday May 9, is one of the most highly anticipated technologies expected to come out of a start-up this year. But Viv is by no means alone in this effort. The quest to define the next generation of artificial-intelligence technology has sparked an arms race among the five major tech giants: Apple, Google, Microsoft, Facebook and Amazon have all announced major investments in virtual-assistant software over the past year.
Gordon Dahlby's insight:
Speech is the new search
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Gordon Dahlby's curator insight, May 5, 12:35 PM
Speech is the new search