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Seven Policy Shifts that Improve Professional Learning | LFA: Join The Conversation - Public School Insights

By Stephanie Hirsh, Executive Director, Learning Forward

Last month I wrote a blog describing the shifts in practice needed in professional learning to improve educator practice and student results. This month, I would like for you to consider shifts in professional learning policies at the state and system level.  

While the first step for many states is adopting more rigorous content and performance standards for students and educators, the key to fully implementing these standards lies in transformed professional learning. Without high-quality professional learning, adopting standards becomes an empty promise.

States and school districts have many options for ensuring effective professional learning that produces desired outcomes. The work must begin with establishing policies that set high expectations and provide the support necessary to achieve them. As policies transform expectations for students and educators, policies must transform expectations for professional learning.

In the spirit of continuing the conversation, use the chart below to consider how well your state or system is transforming its professional learning policies. 

Not only... 
 But also...Requiring professional learning as a core component of every newly adopted initiative and program, Developing a comprehensive system to support effective professional learning.Adopting a definition and Standards for Professional Learning, Assessing the implementation of the definition and Standards for Professional Learning.Some support and/or resources for professional learning, Significant investments in resources and support for implementing state and district priorities.Occasional days set aside for professional learning, Time embedded in the school day and calendar year for educator collaboration and support.Setting annual requirements in days or hours for educator engagement in professional development, Requiring educators to collect evidence demonstrating improved practice and student results.Registering third-party professional learning providers, Establishing more stringent requirements so third-party professional learning providers use evidence to demonstrate impact of their services.Seeking occasional input from stakeholders, Establishing formal feedback and advisory systems to tap expertise and insights of educators, especially those with primary responsibility for implementing initiatives.

To see how your state or local school district measures up on these seven policy shifts, use this number system to determine your score.

3 -  The "But Also" category defines our current system.

2 - Our policies are moving closer to the "But Also" side.

1 -  The "Not Only" category is most characteristic of our policies.

If you scored 18-21 - Give yourselves a hand. More importantly, give your policy and decision makers a hand for the good work they are doing.

If you scored 14 -17 Feel good about being on the right track and recognizing what is essential for professional learning to achieve better outcomes.

If you scored 10 -13 Write a plan on possible steps you will take in the next few months to address what you see as required policy shifts.

If you scored 7-9 - Seek some help from others who have the policies in place you view as important.  

If you scored 7- It's time to focus on policies.  Convene others who share your view and study the resources available to you.  May I recommend you start with ...  

Professional Learning Policy Review: A Workbook for States and Districts 

Comprehensive Professional Learning System: A Workbook for States and Districts 

Many of the other new resources, freely available to educators through our Transforming Professional Learning initiative.

- See more at: http://www.learningfirst.org/seven-policy-shifts-improve-professional-learning?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+LFA+%28Public+School+Insights%3A+What+is+WORKING+in+our+Public+Schools%29#sthash.QEkSkSOk.dpuf

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Educational Technology: Leaders and Leadership
Leaders, Leadership and Best Practice in K-20 Educational Techonology
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Empirical Education Inc. - Ed Tech Research Guidelines

Research Guidelines for the ESSA Era

The Education Technology Industry Network, a division of the Software & Information Industry Association commissioned Empirical Education Inc. to provide guidelines for research given the accelerated development of cloud-based technology and the important policy changes brought about by the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA). The guidelines will help developers and publishers ride this wave of change from NCLB’s sluggish concept of “scientifically-based” to ESSA’s dynamic view of “evidence” for continuous improvement. 


https://www.empiricaleducation.com/pdfs/guidelines.pdf

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Education Technology Industry Network (ETIN) of SIIA
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4 Education Technology Trends That Are Redefining K–12 -- THE Journal

4 Education Technology Trends That Are Redefining K–12 -- THE Journal | Educational Technology: Leaders and Leadership | Scoop.it
4 Education Technology Trends That Are Redefining K–12
By Cathie Norris, Elliot Soloway
04/03/17
Usually articles that talk about education technology trends and predictions appear at the end of year (e.g., Schaffhauser and Kelly’s predictions) or at the beginning of the year (e.g., Kajeet’s predictions). Throwing tradition to the wind, in this week’s blog post, coming during the home stretch of 2016 income tax filing season, we identify four trends that we predict will redefine K–12 education over the next five years. Redefine K–12? Yes! We understand the serious nature of that claim. So, without further ado, let’s see if we can’t convince you of our vision!

Trend 1: Paper-based textbooks are disappearing.

Yes, textbooks are some of the last paper-based books to stick around since, yes, districts are still purchasing paper-based textbooks. (Want a reference? Check with your local school board!) But the paper-based textbook industry is not growing; just the opposite. Textbook publishers are cutting their workforces and regrouping to produce… digital materials!  

Trend 2: Digital curricula is increasing.

Curriculum drives K–12:

"Research tells us that high-quality, aligned instructional material is important in helping teachers support their students…" Bob Hughes, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation
Teachers must have their curriculum! So as the paper-based curriculum industry is dying, the digital curriculum industry is emerging. For example, OER marketplaces (e.g., gooru, Edmodo, CK12) that focus on OER content continue to expand (Amazon is about to open Inspire, an OER website), while organizations that provide full OER-based curricula are beginning to hit their stride (e.g., EngageNY, Open Up). The latter provide the curriculum free — since it is based on free OER materials — but make money, and stay afloat to produce more curricula, by providing PD and other support services.

And yes, teachers too are producing digital curriculum — though, we (as well as others, e.g., Learning Counsel and the Rand Corp) have voiced concern on more than one occasion about the challenges classroom teachers face in producing "high-quality" curriculum while doing the zillion other things teachers are already required to do. Bill Schmidt, a well-regarded, math ed researcher concurs:

"It’s a rather elaborate and extensive endeavor to write instructional materials for a whole year, and I think that no one should expect that teachers have the time nor the professional background to do that."
The above caveat and concerns notwithstanding,
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Preserving OERs for the Future

Just as open educational resources (OERs) are gaining traction among K–12 educators, a lawsuit filed by OER curricula provider Great Minds threatens to stall the growth. School districts are struggling to determine the impact that this lawsuit will have on their use of OER materials.
What is Great Minds? Per its website’s About page, it is a nonprofit that was founded in 2007 by a group of education leaders “to define and encourage content-rich comprehensive education for all American schoolchildren. In pursuit of that mission, Great Minds brings schoolteachers together in collaboration with scholars to craft exemplary instructional materials and share them with the field.”

Great Minds v. FedEx Office and Print Services, Inc.

On March 24, 2016, Great Minds filed suit against FedEx Office in the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of New York requesting, among other things, that FedEx Office reimburse Great Minds for its profits and income earned for photocopying Great Minds’ materials. The materials at issue are made available for free to the public (including school districts) under an open license for noncommercial use. Great Minds uses a Creative Commons (CC) Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International license, known as BY-NC-SA (creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/legalcode), to do so. Great Minds argues that FedEx Office is committing copyright infringement because it profits off of the copying of these materials in violation of BY-NC-SA and should have negotiated a royalty arrangement with Great Minds, which FedEx Office refuses to do. Great Minds says it uses the proceeds from copyright agreements to improve its products and services.

On Aug. 30, Creative Commons requested permission to file an amicus brief. Its general counsel, Diane Peters, says that “since the core of the litigation depends on the proper interpretation of the CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 license … and while we rarely file amicus briefs, we feel strongly that the correct interpretation of the legal code here is essential to the utility of the NC licenses for both licensors and licensees, including those using any of the more than 370 million works that are licensed under one of CC’s NC licenses.”

A motion to dismiss was filed on Aug. 24 by FedEx Office, which stated, “This case results from Plaintiff Great Minds’ effort to stretch the Copyright Act and misapply the license it grants for free to anyone who asks. The Complaint rests upon the mistaken premise that the school districts that Great Minds explicitly licenses to reproduce its materials for educational use may not enlist FedEx Office to make those reproductions on their behalf. This tortured logic should be rejected. The law is clear that a licensee may enlist others to help it perform licensed activities. FedEx Office is doing just that. There is therefore no infringement and this case must be dismissed” (docplayer.net/25902369-Case-2-16-cv-drh-arl-document-15-1-filed-08-24-16-page-1-of-11-pageid-110-ecf-case.html).
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How to Harden Your Enterprise in Today’s Threat Landscape

How to Harden Your Enterprise in Today’s Threat Landscape | Educational Technology: Leaders and Leadership | Scoop.it
How to Harden Your Enterprise in Today’s Threat Landscape
Instructor(s): Andrew Idell and Frank Brinkmann
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2017 Technology in the Classroom Survey Results

Over 2,500 teachers and administrators across the U.S. participated, answering questions regarding the state of technology at their schools. The results overwhelmingly pointed to the proliferation of technology in classrooms across the U.S.: 3 out of 5 teachers say their use of technology will increase during the 2016-2017 school year. 80 percent of teachers believe…
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Deconstructing the development mindset | SmartBrief

Deconstructing the development mindset | SmartBrief | Educational Technology: Leaders and Leadership | Scoop.it
Since Peter Senge coined the expression "learning organization" more than two decades ago, businesses around the world have aspired to leverage learning toward agility, transformation and long-term success. And most leaders will admit that they still struggle to make this dream a reality.
But what if we reframe the conversation? What if we shift the focus from the organization to the individual? Because learning organizations are the result of individuals who possess a deeply held learning orientation and a commitment to growth. Learning organizations are the result of a workforce that shares a development mindset.
Defining "development mindset"

A development mindset is a pattern of thinking and a way of looking at the world that invites ongoing opportunities for continuous individual and organizational transformation. It’s an abundant perspective that recognizes significance that others might overlook.
Those with a development mindset appreciate that development is a state of mind, not a series of discrete activities or classes. They tend to:
Assume that they are capable of learning and growing throughout their entire careers.
Expect that there is something to be learned from nearly all experiences.
Believe that experimentation and failure are powerful, necessary and productive parts of the learning process.
Take responsibility, initiative and ownership for their ongoing growth.
Commit to helping others reach their potential.
Value feedback as helpful information to fuel improvement.
Appreciate that development is not a "one and done" activity but rather a perpetual cycle of learning, application, practice, reflection, and refinement.
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Guide to Choosing Digital Content and Curriculum

Guide to Choosing Digital Content and Curriculum | Educational Technology: Leaders and Leadership | Scoop.it
Working in collaboration with the Consortium for School Networking (CoSN) and the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE), the Center for Digital Education produced this Guide to Choosing Digital Content and Curriculum to help districts address some of the challenges of moving from a print-based to a digital-based curriculum. It provides context, effective practices and resources for districts, and presents case studies of districts already implementing digital content or setting up the infrastructure to do so. We hope you find it useful and informative as you begin or continue implementing digital content and curriculum.
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PRTG Network Monitor Unifies Management Tools on Single Platform

PRTG Network Monitor Unifies Management Tools on Single Platform | Educational Technology: Leaders and Leadership | Scoop.it
Network monitoring has to be one of the most thankless jobs in IT. After all, network monitoring can be a tedious, time-consuming process, using multiple management products often integrated poorly or not at all. That means network managers may not trust the data reports, alerts and action results they are getting. Paessler aims to change the negative perception of many of the currently available tools with PRTG Network Monitor 16, the latest version of the technology. PRTG promises to unify network monitoring into a single management platform that can execute automated actions based on administrator-defined policies. What's more, PRTG offers extensive support for all the common network discovery and traffic-reporting capabilities in use by most network devices today. The product also offers hundreds of sensors fine-tuned to work with popular network products to make sure no important information falls through the cracks. Administrators also will appreciate the ease of creating custom sensors to work with devices not normally covered in the mix. The product's capabilities extend to the forthcoming deluge of Internet of things devices, which are sure to make network management even more complicated.
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2 Leadership Models Link Technology, Academics and Instruction

2 Leadership Models Link Technology, Academics and Instruction | Educational Technology: Leaders and Leadership | Scoop.it
Miami-Dade and Arlington school districts have created very different but successful organizational structures that enhance decision-making between superintendents, chief academic officers and chief information officers.
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13 Steps to Shape & Secure Your 1:1 Chromebook Program

13 Steps to Shape & Secure Your 1:1 Chromebook Program | Educational Technology: Leaders and Leadership | Scoop.it
The following tips will help maximize the online safety and productivity of your students.  We will demystify the Google Apps for Education Admin Console, providing you with the tools to successfully optimize your school’s 1:1 program and edtech experience.  Taken from Best Practices to Shape & Secure Your 1:1 Program for Chromebooks.

The Google Apps cloud-based policy, simplified:

Device Settings (Steps 1-3)
User Settings (Steps 4-13)
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Designing and Creating Maker Spaces

Designing and Creating Maker Spaces | Educational Technology: Leaders and Leadership | Scoop.it

Designing and Creating Maker Spaces


Most educators think robotics, 3D printing and construction when they envision maker spaces, so how does this concept fit into the curriculum? By using design thinking as a framework for instruction, we will explore the possibilities for students to engage in empathy, seek new problems to solve, then prototype and test their solutions. When students start to create material for a larger audience, they ultimately need a way to make their ideas into physical realities. We will look at the pedagogy and the process to help make this happen. Topics included: Discussion of the pedagogy behind the evolution of maker spaces Examples of maker spaces from around the world Ideas for how you can bring design thinking and making into any curriculum You can also attend one of the EdTech Teacher Summer Workshops taking place in seven cities across the United States to learn from Beth and Douglas in person. Visit ettsummer.org/#Workshops to find out how to get involved. beth holland Beth Holland combines over 17 years of experience in mobile learning, K–12 education and differentiated instruction to help teachers create innovative learning environments. She blogs regularly for Edutopia and EdTech Researcher at Education Week, presents nationally and internationally, and is an authorized Google Education Trainer. Beth holds a master’s degree from Harvard University and a bachelor’s degree from Northwestern University. In addition to being an EdTech Teacher instructor, she is a doctoral student at Johns Hopkins University. doug kiangDouglas Kiang is a dynamic speaker, teacher and workshop presenter with over 20 years of teaching experience in independent schools at every grade level. He currently teaches computer science and heads the technology resource teachers group at Punahou School in Honolulu, Hawaii. Douglas holds a master’s degree in technology, innovation and education from Harvard and is an Apple Distinguished Educator as well as an authorized Google Education Trainer. He is the author of five bestselling game strategy guides, and his latest book on Minecraft in Education is soon to be published by Peachpit Press. 


 WATCH THE WEBINAR RECORDING

https://www.anymeeting.com/355-979-664/E953DD86844D39


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Even Apple is acknowledging that the “iPads in education” fad is coming to an end

Even Apple is acknowledging that the “iPads in education” fad is coming to an end | Educational Technology: Leaders and Leadership | Scoop.it
These were the findings from a survey of high school students and teachers in a district in the US state of Maine on how effective iPads were for learning and teaching. Almost 90% of teachers and 74% of students preferred laptops over tablets, according to the Lewiston-Auburn Sun Journal.
Even Apple has bent to the will of students and teachers. Following the poll, the tech giant and Maine’s Department of Education are now offering schools in the state the chance to trade in iPads ordered in 2013 for new MacBook Air laptops, at no additional cost.
“If we had known how big a transition it would have been [to switch] from laptops to iPads we would have proactively done some good work with teachers to make the transition easier for them,” Mike Muir, the policy director of the Maine Learning Through Technology Initiative, told Quartz.
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A lesson on pilots with a robust evaluation components that include students and parents as well as classroom teachers.  Evaluation process links to project goals.  It's not Texas-hold 'em like to go 'all in."

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ERIC EJ873675: Educational Outcomes and Research from 1:1 Computing Settings : 

ERIC EJ873675: Educational Outcomes and Research from 1:1 Computing Settings :  | Educational Technology: Leaders and Leadership | Scoop.it
Despite the growing interest in 1:1 computing initiatives, relatively little empirical research has focused on the outcomes of these investments. Th
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THREAT LANDSCAPE REPORT Q1 2017

From Fortinet
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How a Large District Scales up to One-to-One

How a Large District Scales up to One-to-One | Educational Technology: Leaders and Leadership | Scoop.it
With 210,000 students, Florida's Hillsborough County Public Schools is the eighth-largest district in the country. Implementing one-to-one on that scale is no easy task but that hasn't stopped the district from moving in that direction.
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Using AWS To Manage On-Premises Servers -- AWSInsider

Using AWS To Manage On-Premises Servers -- AWSInsider | Educational Technology: Leaders and Leadership | Scoop.it
Although the Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) is designed to run instances within the Amazon Web Services (AWS) cloud, the EC2 console can also be used to manage instances that are running within your own datacenter. These instances can be listed alongside cloud-based instances in the console (on-premises instances are displayed with a mi- prefix).

The exact method that you will have to use to manage an on-premises instance will vary depending on whether the instance is running Windows or Linux. For the purposes of this column, I am going to be using a Microsoft Hyper-V virtual machine that is running Windows Server 2016. Incidentally, AWS supports the use of Windows Server 2003 and higher.
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The Secret to Better Problem Solving

The Secret to Better Problem Solving | Educational Technology: Leaders and Leadership | Scoop.it

Thomas Wedell-Wedellsborg discusses a nimbler approach to diagnosing problems than existing frameworks: reframing. He’s the author of “Are You Solving the Right Problems?” in the January/February 2017 issue of Harvard Business Review. Podcast




Also: https://hbr.org/2017/01/are-you-solving-the-right-problems article

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Digital Literacy > An NMC Horizon Project Strategic Brief

Digital Literacy > An NMC Horizon Project Strategic Brief | Educational Technology: Leaders and Leadership | Scoop.it
Digital Literacy: An NMC Horizon Project Strategic Brief was commissioned by Adobe Systems to explore an increasingly pressing challenge for United States higher education institutions: advancing digital literacy among students and faculty. Unfortunately, lack of agreement on what comprises digital literacy is impeding many colleges and universities from formulating adequate policies and programs. The aim of this publication is to establish a shared vision of digital literacy for higher education leaders by illuminating key definitions and models along with best practices and recommendations for implementing successful digital literacy initiatives. Findings from our digital literacy survey as well as from the NMC Horizon Project environmental scanning process will depict the benefits of digital tools and approaches, providing positive exemplars in higher education.
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Baltimore County Measures the Impact of Technology Initiatives | LFA: Join The Conversation - Public School Insights

Baltimore County Measures the Impact of Technology Initiatives | LFA: Join The Conversation - Public School Insights | Educational Technology: Leaders and Leadership | Scoop.it
Using technology in meaningful ways is as essential to today’s teaching and learning as reading, writing, and arithmetic. Stakeholders from around Baltimore County understood this urgency and prioritized graduating every student globally competitive in our Blueprint 2.0 strategic plan. Our theory of action leverages technology in two ways—through equitable access for every student to an effective digital learning environment and second language proficiency. The bold initiatives that are transforming our schools are S.T.A.T., or Students and Teachers Accessing Tomorrow, and the Passport Program for elementary world language instruction.

S.T.A.T. is creating new opportunities for personalization, customization, and engagement guided by digital curriculum more focused on critical thinking and analytical skills. Additional components include the BCPS One digital ecosystem for easy educator and family access to student information and learning resources, 1:1 devices, and wireless and broadband at public schools and libraries. School-embedded instructional coaches known as S.T.A.T. teachers tailor professional development to school needs to facilitate learner-centered environments where students actively choose how to meet objectives and how to demonstrate what they know and can do.

Digital learning is also essential to Passport, which supplements weekly conversational Spanish lessons with an interactive, online program designed for children. Through BCPS One, students have anytime, anywhere access to the program for practicing speaking and listening.

Ongoing investments and support from the community known as Team BCPS are critical to bringing these changes in instruction and infrastructure to nearly 112,000 students. To provide this support, our stakeholders—from families to staff, residents, and decision makers—need to know how these programs are contributing to the future of our students, schools, and county.
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School desktop disruption

School desktop disruption | Educational Technology: Leaders and Leadership | Scoop.it
concept of “going virtual” has been gaining traction in the IT world for years, beginning in data centers with server virtualization.

Today, school district CIOs who have taken the next step—the virtualization of desktop computers—see a new range of benefits, including increased flexibility for users, cost savings, stronger security, and more frequent updates of hardware and software.

Virtualization technology moves a user’s desktop and associated software into the cloud so the environment can be accessed from any physical computer.
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eBook - DNS User Guide || Catchpoint Systems

eBook - DNS User Guide || Catchpoint Systems | Educational Technology: Leaders and Leadership | Scoop.it
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Federal court upholds FCC's net neutrality rules

Federal court upholds FCC's net neutrality rules | Educational Technology: Leaders and Leadership | Scoop.it
The Federal Communications Commission's net neutrality rules remain in effect with backing in federal courts -- for now, at least.

Opponents of the FCC's rules for the Open Internet, or net neutrality, plan to take their challenge to the Supreme Court.  "We have always expected this issue to be decided by the Supreme Court, and we look forward to participating in that appeal," said AT&T General Counsel David McAtee in a statement after the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit ruled 2-1 Tuesday in favor of the FCC's rules.

AT&T was among many companies and groups that filed a suit in 2015 challenging the rules. Its was among several cases consolidated into originating cases filled by USTelecom, a trade association that counts among its members AT&T and Verizon, and Alamo Broadband, a fixed wireless broadband service in the San Antonio, Tex. area.
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How hackers held a district hostage for almost $10,000

How hackers held a district hostage for almost $10,000 | Educational Technology: Leaders and Leadership | Scoop.it
Think ransoms are only paid out to rescue victims of kidnappings? Think again.
Imagine walking into your office one morning and finding some (or all) of your district’s computer files “padlocked” and inaccessible. In the corner, a masked man is standing with his hand out, demanding an $8,000-$10,000 ransom payment. When he gets the money, he’ll hand over the key to the padlock. If you choose not to pay, then you’ll spend the next few months trying to pick the lock while teachers, students, and administrators are forced to work without their modern technology.

This is essentially what happened to Horry County Schools (HCS) of Conway, S.C., earlier this year. Using a type of malicious software designed to block access to a computer system until a sum of money is paid (aka, “ransomware”), on February 8 hackers used high-level encryption to lock up the district’s data. The criminals then held that data for ransom and demanded the district pay nearly $10,000 via Bitcoin for the encryption key.

Charles Hucks, executive director of technology, says the district had experienced a few breaches during the months leading up to the attack, but nothing of this magnitude. “A few devices of teachers were hit and some of their local files were encrypted,” says Hucks. “In some cases network-based files on individual directories were also encrypted, but the impact of those attacks was very limited. They were isolated incidents.”

Attacks are on the rise
Ransomware attacks are on the rise. According to a recent PhishMe analysis of phishing email campaigns (i.e., a deceptive attempt to pose as a reputable entity via email), during the first three months of 2016 there were 6.3 million more phishing attacks than there were during the same period last year. This represents a 789% increase that’s primarily due to an upsurgence in ransomware.
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LEFT TO CHANCE:
U.S. Middle Schoolers Lack in-Depth Experience
With Technology and Engineering via @changeequation

Technology and engineering have played central roles in forming our national identity. We see the United States as a nation of tinkerers and inventors who have helped chart the course of global innovation for centuries. Only time will tell if we can continue to live up to this conception of ourselves. As technology and engineering come to affect almost every aspect of modern life, this is no small matter. New data from the first-ever Nation’s Report Card in Technology and Engineering Literacy (TEL) are not reassuring. Well less than half the nation’s eighth-graders are on track to become proficient in a set of skills they will need to thrive in society and the workplace. Low-income and minority youth lag farthest behind.1 On closer examination, these findings should not surprise us. Change the Equation’s analysis of survey data from TEL reveals that millions of American youth spend precious little time tinkering, troubleshooting, or doing the kinds of hands-on problem-solving that are at the heart of technology and engineering. Girls, minorities, and low-income students do least of all—dampening hopes to create a more diverse STEM workforce in future years. 
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Study Finds that 70-inch Display Unreadable By Half of Students

Radius Global Market Research has released findings from a recent study conducted that evaluated the readability of content displayed on a 70-inch flat panel in an average-sized classroom. According to the new research, 58 percent of students in an average classroom can’t read content displayed on a 70-inch flat panel.
The study was conducted with a sample group of 106 students ages 12-to-22 in groups of approximately 30 at a time. Students were asked to read typical education content including charts and text-based information displayed on a top-selling 70-inch flat panel in a traditional 30-foot-by-30-footclassroom, and then write down six short items of information from what they saw. The students sat in five rows 22-feet wide (six seats per row) with the first row approximately eight feet from the display, and the last row about 27 feet from the display.
The results indicated that, on average, 17 out of 30 students per classroom were not able to read the content on the 70-inch flat panel. Inability to read the content was defined as writing down at least one item incorrectly.
"The majority of students evaluated in the study clearly had difficulty reading the content displayed on the 70-inch flat panel,” said Shira Horn, vice president, Radius Global Market Research.
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