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Educational Technology in Higher Education
A scoop it magazine focusing on educational technology in higher education.
Curated by Mark Smithers
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Do You Really Need An Instructional Design Degree? » The Rapid eLearning Blog

Do You Really Need An Instructional Design Degree? » The Rapid eLearning Blog | Educational Technology in Higher Education | Scoop.it
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The learning design studio: collaborative design inquiry as teachers’ professional development | Mor | Research in Learning Technology

The learning design studio: collaborative design inquiry as teachers’ professional development | Mor | Research in Learning Technology | Educational Technology in Higher Education | Scoop.it
The learning design studio: collaborative design inquiry as teachers’ professional development
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Iterations: We Need More Design in Instructional Design [Ep. 8]

Iterations: We Need More Design in Instructional Design [Ep. 8] | Educational Technology in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Richard Sites & Angel Green discuss what instructional design is and why it is different from instructional materials development.
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Before and After: How To Fix 3 Dreadful eLearning Design Errors

Before and After: How To Fix 3 Dreadful eLearning Design Errors | Educational Technology in Higher Education | Scoop.it
The challenges for designing eLearning courses are more than just developing course content. Distractions are everywhere and if you plan to attract a
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Social Content Curation for Learning Communities

Social Content Curation for Learning Communities | Educational Technology in Higher Education | Scoop.it
An infographic I created for a MOOC at Stanford: Designing New Learning Environments. Made with too little space, too little skills, too little time and too little research. Lots of fun though.

Via catspyjamasnz
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Kirsten Wilson's curator insight, June 19, 2013 11:26 AM

Interesting take on a few forms of curation that can be used.  Infographic is, as the creator remarked, a little crowded, however the information is useful.

Begoña Iturgaitz's curator insight, June 19, 2013 12:22 PM

do we know the actual size of what we're traying to make?

LundTechIntegration's curator insight, June 20, 2013 8:59 AM

Love this graphic.

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Designing a Learning Design MOOC

I am very excited to be part of a team developing a Learning Design Massive Open Online Course (MOOC), which will be delivered in October 2012. As part of our preparation for this I attended a workshop at the OU last week. This blog post describes the outputs produced in the team I was part of which consists of myself, Ale Armellini and Anna Page.

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Designing Online Learning

Designing Online Learning | Educational Technology in Higher Education | Scoop.it
This is an interview with Richard Culatta about the importance of developing interactive online learning. Online learning should connect learners with each other and with experts and not just content.
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How to Structure an eLearning Interaction

How to Structure an eLearning Interaction | Educational Technology in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Whether you are designing an eLearning course or an instructor-led session, your solution will likely include a series carefully-planned learning interactions. These interactions should be closely
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Agile vs ADDIE: Which Is Better for Learning Design?

Agile vs ADDIE: Which Is Better for Learning Design? | Educational Technology in Higher Education | Scoop.it
My last post was about Agile Learning Design, an iterative model of instructional design that focuses on collaboration and rapid prototyping. And it's become quite a hot topic this past year.
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A Course Design 'Sprint': My Experience in an Education Hackathon

A Course Design 'Sprint': My Experience in an Education Hackathon | Educational Technology in Higher Education | Scoop.it
This past Saturday, February 23, I participated in my first hackathon event; not a coding event as typical of computer programmers, but an education hackathon—a “Course Sprint” where a group of fou...
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Instructional Design Connectivism - by George Siemens (2008)

Instructional Design Connectivism - by George Siemens (2008) | Educational Technology in Higher Education | Scoop.it

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Clark Quinn: Levels of eLearning Quality

Clark Quinn: Levels of eLearning Quality | Educational Technology in Higher Education | Scoop.it

Of late, I’ve been both reviewing eLearning, and designing processes & templates. As I’ve said before, the nuances between well-designed and well produced eLearning are subtle, but important. Reading a forthcoming book that outlines the future but recounts the past, it occurs to me that it may be worthwhile to look at a continuum of possibilities.


Via Andreas Link
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Konstantinos Kalemis's comment, August 1, 2012 3:44 PM
The evaluation framework here draws on three main influences: a countenance approach ; action evaluation and report and respond. Distinctive to the approach is that it permits insider evaluation, led by internal agents within the organization who are well placed to use the evaluation research on an ongoing basis to guide and influence decision-making.
Stake’s countenance approach to evaluation is represented schematically with three phases: antecedent, transaction, and outcome. At each phase there are two categories of data: descriptive data and judgement data.
The process of countenance evaluation is to portray both the degree of congruence between the descriptive data and the judgement data and the logical contingency between the intents and outcomes of each phase with the next. The term “portrayal” is significant here, because a distinctive aspect of countenance evaluation is the generation of depictions of what is observed. What is observed is then compared with the intended outcomes of the programme, and inferences can then be formulated. These inferences not only identify the intended outcomes
that have or have not been achieved, but also identify the unintended and observable outcomes of the programme. For the evaluation of the e-learning implementation, the strength in this approach lies in its facility
in organizing a large amount of quite diverse data.A second guiding influence on the development of the evaluation framework is taken from the arena of conflict resolution, namely, action evaluation. In action evaluation, there are similarly three phases: baseline, formative,
and summative.
Action evaluation is, unlike countenance evaluation, very much a participatory evaluation method and involves stakeholders from the outset. The purpose of the evaluation is to make a difference to the
actions of individuals and groups within the stakeholder body. Therefore, stakeholders are involved at all stages of the evaluation. For example, in the first, baseline phase, stakeholders identify what the terms of success might be for the intervention on an individual, group, and organizational level. The emphasis is not only on the “what,”
but also on the “why,” thus making explicit inner motivations for action (Rothman, 2003).
This approach was helpful in providing a context for the evaluation meetings held intermittently throughout the evaluation process.
The third major element to the evaluation framework is a reporting method taken from Stronach and McLure’s work on educational evaluation (1997). According to this method, the evaluator presents a structured report to the stakeholders at a number of points within an evaluation. In the report the evaluator makes provisional, and
sometimes provocative, statements resulting from analysis of documentation, discussions, and observations.
The report raises questions for consideration by the readers, and provides space within the printed document for the
insertion of stakeholder responses, be they further clarification, correction, support, or objection to the evaluator’s formulations.
This approach enabled early feedback on the evaluation work and brought to light useful additional viewpoints and facts that increased the validity of the evaluation work.