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Educational Technology in Higher Education
A scoop it magazine focusing on educational technology in higher education.
Curated by Mark Smithers
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Competency-Based Degrees: Coming Soon to a Campus Near You

Competency-Based Degrees: Coming Soon to a Campus Near You | Educational Technology in Higher Education | Scoop.it
For the increasing number of students who seek value and industry-relevant skill sets, this model will prove awfully enticing.
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Degrees Based on What You Can Do, Not How Long You Went

Degrees Based on What You Can Do, Not How Long You Went | Educational Technology in Higher Education | Scoop.it
College leaders say that by focusing on what people know, not how or when they learn it, and by tapping new technology, they can save students time and lower costs.
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Top Free Classes's curator insight, October 31, 2013 3:36 AM

In March of this year, the Department of Education invited colleges to submit programs for consideration under Title IV aid that do not rely on seat time. In response, public, private and for-profit institutions alike have rushed out programs that are changing the college degree in fundamental ways; they are based not on time in a course but on tangible evidence of learning, a concept known as competency-based education. President Obama issued a call to improve college affordability that went beyond boilerplates about loans and Pell grants. He proposed a rating system that would attach federal higher education dollars to a college’s cost effectiveness and student performance. “Colleges have to work harder to prevent tuition from going up year after year,” the president said. “We’re going to encourage more colleges to innovate, try new things, do things that can provide a great education without breaking the bank.”

Debbie Ruston - The Success Educator's curator insight, October 31, 2013 2:05 PM

Because something was introduced in 1893 and was relevant for decades, does not mean it meets the needs of today's learners.