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What Kids Should Know About Their Own Brains

What Kids Should Know About Their Own Brains | Educational Psychology & Technology | Scoop.it

"...In a well-known body of research, Stanford University psychologist Carol Dweck has demonstrated that teaching students about how their brains work—in particular, that the brain is plastic and can develop new capacities with effort and practice—makes a big difference in how constructively kids deal with mistakes and setbacks, and how motivated they are to persist until they achieve mastery."- Annie Murphy Paul

Full post at: http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2012/04/what-kids-should-know-about-their-own-brains/

 

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Educational Psychology & Technology
This current collection includes news, resources, research, and strategies to support engaged learning. For additional updates and Educator Resource collections, visit http://EduResearcher.com
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Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us // Dan Pink, RSA Animate

"This lively RSAnimate, adapted from Dan Pink's talk at the RSA, illustrates the hidden truths behind what really motivates us at home and in the workplace."

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Mark Venters's comment, November 24, 2012 7:58 AM
A true paradigm shift in motivating people.
Sonia Thomas's curator insight, March 29, 12:30 PM

Reducing control over employee work can lead to better outcomes

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One Man's Mission to Ensure Schools Uphold Arts in Education Law // SCPR.org

One Man's Mission to Ensure Schools Uphold Arts in Education Law // SCPR.org | Educational Psychology & Technology | Scoop.it

By Mary Plummer [Picture caption: Music teacher and former principal Carl Schafer has logged about 1,700 miles during his three-year quest to get arts taught in California's public schools. Mary Plummer/KPCC]


"There’s a little-known law that requires California's public schools to teach dance, theater, visual arts and music. Most school districts ignore it. Carl Schafer is on a mission to change that. 


Schafer has spent the last three years lobbying to get arts instruction to every student in the state.


His journey began a few years back, when Schafer discovered words in California’s education code that mandate arts instruction for 1st through 12th-graders.


"When I first started doing this and bringing it up, there were lots of people in very important positions in education who were not aware," he said. 


Since then, Schafer has made it his personal crusade to ensure the law is enforced. He's had meetings with state Sen. Carol Liu; Rick Pratt, the chief consultant to the state Assembly Committee on Education; and California Congressman Ted Lieu.


Schafer's made some progress. State Sen. Ben Allen is considering calling for an informational hearing to tackle the subject of arts instruction in the education code. The California Arts Council has also agreed to discuss the education code at a September meeting in Santa Cruz.


Schafer thinks all schools can offer arts instruction as mandated by the state.


"I think it’s attainable," he said. "It’s really, I think, a matter of learning how to do it." ...


*** 


"Nationwide, 42 states require the arts be taught from elementary to high school. But in recent years, the recession and an emphasis on standardized testing led to arts funding cuts in many school districts."...


For full post, click on title above or here: 
http://www.scpr.org/news/2015/07/23/53291/man-on-a-mission-works-to-get-california-to-enforc/  

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Brain-Based Learning, Myth vs Reality: Testing Learning Styles and Dual Coding // Science-Based Medicine

Brain-Based Learning, Myth vs Reality: Testing Learning Styles and Dual Coding // Science-Based Medicine | Educational Psychology & Technology | Scoop.it

Ed. Note: Today we present a guest post from Josh Cuevas, a cognitive psychologist and assistant professor in the College of Education at the University of North Georgia. Enjoy!


"Since early on in graduate school when I began studying cognition, I’ve followed the learning styles movement because it was such a powerful phenomenon. It took hold rapidly, seemingly overnight, at all levels of education. And, like so many fads in education and science, it created a big-money industry involving conferences, training seminars, paid speakers, how-to manuals, and a variety of other mediums, inevitably linked to a profit in some way. Yet in the peer reviewed studies I was sifting through, evidence for learning styles was nowhere to be found. And more than a decade later I’m still looking for it.

Today when I suggest to students that learning styles are no more than a myth, I can hear their collective jaws drop, regardless of whether they’re undergraduates or graduate students, because learning styles have been preached to them the entire time they’ve been in school. The graduate students concern me the most because they’re supposed to know the research. And I used the term “preached” because these students have been convinced via no more than word of mouth, are asked to accept the information based on faith, and many come to hold a strange religious-like fervor for the concept. That’s not how science works and it shouldn’t be how education works.


It has been no easy task combating this common misconception in college classrooms, particularly when it is reinforced in textbooks, by other professors (who are also supposed to know the research), and in public schools where students do their internships. The research we’re doing at the University of North Georgia on learning styles has two purposes – it allows us to collect data on the effects of learning styles and contrast it to a stronger model, dual coding, but it also lets us demonstrate, in real time, to students who will one day be teachers how what they’ve long believed to be true simply does not work when put to the test."...


For full post, click on title above or here: 
https://www.sciencebasedmedicine.org/brain-based-learning-myth-versus-reality-testing-learning-styles-and-dual-coding/  



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The Writing Assignment That Changes Lives // Anya Kamenetz, NPR

The Writing Assignment That Changes Lives // Anya Kamenetz, NPR | Educational Psychology & Technology | Scoop.it

By Anya Kamenetz (Image credit LA Johnson/NPR) 


"Why do you do what you do? What is the engine that keeps you up late at night or gets you going in the morning? Where is your happy place? What stands between you and your ultimate dream?

Heavy questions. One researcher believes that writing down the answers can be decisive for students.
 

He co-authored a paper that demonstrates a startling effect: nearly erasing the gender and ethnic minority achievement gap for 700 students over the course of two years with a short written exercise in setting goals.
 

Jordan Peterson teaches in the department of psychology at the University of Toronto. For decades, he has been fascinated by the effects of writing on organizing thoughts and emotions.
 

Experiments going back to the 1980s have shown that "therapeutic" or "expressive" writing can reduce depression, increase productivity and even cut down on visits to the doctor.
 

"The act of writing is more powerful than people think," Peterson says.


Most people grapple at some time or another with free-floating anxiety that saps energy and increases stress. Through written reflection, you may realize that a certain unpleasant feeling ties back to, say, a difficult interaction with your mother. That type of insight, research has shown, can help locate, ground and ultimately resolve the emotion and the associated stress.


At the same time, "goal-setting theory" holds that writing down concrete, specific goals and strategies can help people overcome obstacles and achieve.
 

'It Turned My Life Around'


Recently, researchers have been getting more and more interested in the role that mental motivation plays in academic achievement — sometimes conceptualized as "grit" or "growth mindset" or "executive functioning."


Peterson wondered whether writing could be shown to affect student motivation. He created an undergraduate course called Maps of Meaning. In it, students complete a set of writing exercises that combine expressive writing with goal-setting.

Students reflect on important moments in their past, identify key personal motivations and create plans for the future, including specific goals and strategies to overcome obstacles. Peterson calls the two parts "past authoring" and "future authoring."


"It completely turned my life around," says Christine Brophy, who, as an undergraduate several years ago, was battling drug abuse and health problems and was on the verge of dropping out. After taking Peterson's course at the University of Toronto, she changed her major. Today she is a doctoral student and one of Peterson's main research assistants."...


For full post, click on title above or here: http://www.npr.org/sections/ed/2015/07/10/419202925/the-writing-assignment-that-changes-lives 

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What’s the Big Idea? // Teaching Philosophy Through Feature Film Clips

What’s the Big Idea? // Teaching Philosophy Through Feature Film Clips | Educational Psychology & Technology | Scoop.it

"Tom Wartenberg and Julie Akeret began working together in 2010 on Picture Book Philosophy, a short film introducing Professor Wartenberg’s work with second graders using children’s picture books to spark philosophical discussions. Tom Wartenberg and Julie Akeret began developing What’s the Big Idea? because of a shared belief in the crucial role of education in our lives.

 

In his book Big Ideas for Little Kids, Wartenberg says,

“In his famous dialogue The Republic, Plato boldly asserted that there would be no justice in the world until philosophers became kings. Just as Plato’s social vision depended upon having rulers who possessed the truth, so our own democratic society requires a citizenry of independent, critical thinkers that only a philosophical education can produce.”

 

This program is for students and teachers everywhere."...

 

For main website, click on title or image above or here: http://whatsthebigideaprogram.com/


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U.S. Millennials Know Technology, But Not How to Solve Problems With It, Study Says

U.S. Millennials Know Technology, But Not How to Solve Problems With It, Study Says | Educational Psychology & Technology | Scoop.it

"The U.S. education system isn't adequately preparing students to use technology for problem-solving, according to a newly released analysis, which recommends what public schools and businesses can do to address that problem.
 

Change the Equation, a Washington-based organization promoting science, technology, engineering, and math, or "STEM" studies, looked at how American millennials—the first "digital natives" because they were born after the Internet—fared in an international study of adult skills in 19 countries.
 

To do so, the organization conducted an original analysis of data from the 2012 Program for International Assessment of Adult Competencies, which tested the key cognitive and workplace skills needed to participate in society.

"Yes, [millennials] can take selfies," said Linda Rosen, CEO of Change the Equation, in a presentation announcing the organization's findings this week. "Yes, they can use social media."
 

What they are not so capable of doing is solving high-level problems with technology, she said. In fact, 58 percent of millennials struggle to use digital tools and networks to solve relatively simple problems that involve skills like sorting, searching for, and emailing information from a spreadsheet, the study found."...

 

For full post, click on title above or here: http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/DigitalEducation/2015/06/us_millennials_know_technology.html

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#CATeacherSummit, Brought to You By The Gates Foundation // Anthony Cody, Living in Dialogue

#CATeacherSummit, Brought to You By The Gates Foundation // Anthony Cody, Living in Dialogue | Educational Psychology & Technology | Scoop.it

"A high stakes experiment in educational collaboration is unfolding in the state of California, and I have a feeling of foreboding. I am afraid teachers and students in my state are like frogs in a pot that is slowly heating, and before we know it we will be cooked.


Though State Superintendent Tom Torlakson issued a statement in May renaming the state standards the “California Standards,” the state remains wedded to the Common Core. At the end of this month, there will be a full day of events bringing teachers to California State Universities to celebrate the Common Core, funded by a $1.25 million Gates Foundation grant. (You can join in the conversations around the event on Twitter using the hashtag #CATeachersSummit). The state has also approved half a billion dollars to promote teacher effectiveness, much of which will be aimed at supporting implementation of the Common Core."

 

California has a lot of things going for it. In Jerry Brown we have a governor who seems to understand the dangers of reliance on high stakes tests, as evidenced by his eloquent 2009 letter to Arne Duncan criticizing Race to the Top. We have Tom Torlakson, a former teacher, as our state superintendent of schools. We have a state legislature controlled by a Democratic Party supermajority, and a powerful California Teachers Association that has influence with all three. In addition to this, Linda Darling-Hammond is the chair of the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing, and has been quite active at the state level. As a result, the state has held off from the worst elements of the corporate reform policies, and is implementing some new approaches that could shift us away from the heavy-handed test-and-punish practices of No Child Left Behind."...

 

For full post with live links, click on title above or here: 
http://www.livingindialogue.com/common-core-teacher-day-in-california-brought-to-you-by-the-gates-foundation/

 

 

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How Teens Do Research in the Digital World // Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project

How Teens Do Research in the Digital World // Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project | Educational Psychology & Technology | Scoop.it

"Three-quarters of AP and NWP teachers say that the internet  and digital search tools have had a “mostly positive” impact on their students’ research habits, but 87% say these technologies are creating an “easily distracted generation with short attention spans” and 64% say today’s digital technologies “do more to distract students than to help them academically.
 

These complex and at times contradictory judgments emerge from 1) an online survey of more than 2,000 middle and high school teachers drawn from the Advanced Placement (AP) and National Writing Project (NWP) communities; and 2) a series of online and offline focus groups with middle and high school teachers and some of their students. The study was designed to explore teachers’ views of the ways today’s digital environment is shaping the research and writing habits of middle and high school students.  Building on the Pew Internet Project’s prior work about how people use the internet and, especially, the information-saturated digital lives of teens, this research looks at teachers’ experiences and observations about how the rise of digital material affects the research skills of today’s students."...

 

For full post, click on title above or here: 

http://pewinternet.org/Reports/2012/Student-Research.aspx

 

 


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"Rush, Little Baby": How The Push for Infant Academics May Actually Be a Waste of Time - or Worse // The Boston Globe

"Rush, Little Baby": How The Push for Infant Academics May Actually Be a Waste of Time - or Worse // The Boston Globe | Educational Psychology & Technology | Scoop.it

[Selected quote] "A classic study in the 1930s by noted researcher and Illinois educator Carleton Washburne compared the trajectories of children who had begun reading at several ages, up to 7. Washburne concluded that, in general, a child could best learn to read beginning around the age of 6. By middle school, he found no appreciable difference in reading levels between the kids who had started young versus the kids who had started later, except the earlier readers appeared to be less motivated and less excited about reading. More recent research also raises doubt about the push for early readers. A cross-cultural study of European children published in 2003 in the British Journal of Psychology found those taught to read at age 5 had more reading problems than those who were taught at age 7. The findings supported a 1997 report critical of Britain's early-reading model.

 

What might explain this? In her fascinating new book Proust and the Squid: The Story and Science of the Reading Brain, Maryanne Wolf offers some answers. True reading requires the integration of complicated functions from different regions of the brain - visual, auditory, linguistic, conceptual - a process that takes time. The speed with which these regions can be integrated depends on something called myelination, in which the tails (or axons) of neurons in the brain are wrapped in a fatty sheathing that makes them perform better. For these regions of the brain to interact efficiently, they need one neuron to talk to another neuron in rapid succession. And to do that well, those neuron tails need lots of myelin. Myelination rates can vary, but Wolf says generally these pivotal regions aren't fully myelinated until sometime between the ages of 5 and 7, with boys probably being on the later side.

 

That's why many kids can master some components of reading at an early age, such as the visual. But other components, such as phonemic awareness - the idea that a word is made up of discrete sounds - typically take longer. Wolf, a cognitive neuroscientist and child development professor at Tufts, relates how a colleague once asked a kindergartner what the first sound in the word "cat" was. The child perked up and replied, "Meow."

 

"There is a really good reason why, across the world, literacy training is not begun until 5 to 7," Wolf says. "Some countries, such as Austria, don't want children taught reading until 7." For what it's worth, that's the same Austria with a per-capita Nobel-laureate rate many times higher than that of Japan, the land that spawned Junior Kumon.

 

After poring over the available research, Wolf concludes in her book, "Many efforts to teach a child to read before 4 or 5 years of age are biologically precipitate and potentially counterproductive for many children." The danger in pushing reading too early, Wolf says, is that, for many children, we may be asking them to do something for which their brains are not ready. "You run the risk of making a child feel like a failure before they've even begun," she says. And while the gains from early reading may fade away, the damage from being tagged a slow kid at a young age has the potential to be permanent."...

 

For full post, click on title above or here: http://www.boston.com/news/globe/magazine/articles/2007/10/28/rush_little_baby/?page=full&nbsp

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Q&A: A Hard Look at L.A.'s Troubled Digital Learning Initiative

Q&A: A Hard Look at L.A.'s Troubled Digital Learning Initiative | Educational Psychology & Technology | Scoop.it

By Benjamin Herold, EdWeek

"Jessica B. Heppen is a managing researcher at the Washington-based American Institutes for Research, where she serves as the principal investigator of the AIR's evaluation of the Los Angeles Unified School District's massive—and deeply troubled—digital learning initiative. While most of the public attention on the LAUSD's since-aborted effort to give every student an iPad has focused on a rocky deployment and a procurement process that led to a federal investigation, the AIR also found big challenges inside classrooms.

 

In a September 2014 report, Ms. Heppen and her team wrote that fewer than half the schools visited by researchers were even using the iPads. In those classrooms where the tablets were in play, the most common use by teachers was for whole-class instruction (26 percent of classrooms observed), followed by Internet research (16 percent), and math or reading practice (12 percent). In just two of the 245 classrooms the AIR researchers observed were teachers using the technology to support collaborative student learning."...

 

For full post, click on title above or here: http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2015/06/11/qa-a-hard-look-at-las-troubled.html

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The Touch-Screen Generation // The Atlantic

The Touch-Screen Generation // The Atlantic | Educational Psychology & Technology | Scoop.it
Young children—even toddlers—are spending more and more time with digital technology. What will it mean for their development?

 

http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2013/04/the-touch-screen-generation/309250/

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Head Teachers: Using Neuroscience for Education

Head Teachers: Using Neuroscience for Education | Educational Psychology & Technology | Scoop.it

By Ben Martynoga 
"Teaching methods are often based on convention over evidence. Can new insights from neuroscience help pupils to learn?" 

 

http://thelongandshort.org/issues/season-four/head-teachers-using-neuroscience-for-education.html

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Free Stock Photos That Are Actually Rather GOOD // Sparky Teaching

Free Stock Photos That Are Actually Rather GOOD // Sparky Teaching | Educational Psychology & Technology | Scoop.it

"As someone wiser than us once said, “You don’t get anything in this life for free…”


Certainly not when it comes to finding half-decent stock photos to use to spice up your Teachmeet or Edcamp presentation, to make inspiring classroom posters out of or spruce up your blog posts. There are two problems with using stock photos — firstly, the good ones aren’t free and, secondly, the free ones aren’t very good!"...


*** 


..."Thankfully, the design community and teachers such as Jane Hewitt are doing their best to provide alternatives to the cheesy and the costly — stylish and high-resolution stock photos that are completely free to do what you like with. Gone are the days of doing a quick Google Image search and cut and pasting an image without really considering who it belongs to. On the back of our post on digital citizenship, we’ve been meaning to write this as a follow-up. What good is an encouragement to cite your sources, respect copyright and give credit where it’s due without any help to do so? Here, then, is your help…

Half-decent stock photos are not always easy to locate, but here are the best we’ve found. What’s great about this list is that for the vast majority, you don’t need to include attribution — the photographer has provided them for you to do what you like with — whether that be the background for your TED talk (!), a story-starter for your English lesson or for your students to use in their project work."...


For full post and links to resources, click on title above or here: http://www.sparkyteaching.com/creative/free-stock-photos/ 

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Creating Memes to Explore Themes // Catlin Tucker

Creating Memes to Explore Themes // Catlin Tucker | Educational Psychology & Technology | Scoop.it

By Catlin Tucker [see original post here]
 

"Yesterday, I stumbled onto the KQED YouTube video about making memes. I love memes! A meme is a humorous image, video, piece of text, etc. that is copied–often with slight variations–and spread rapidly by Internet users. I decided I wanted to find a way to incorporate memes in my English class. The timing was perfect. We are just wrapping upThe Joy Luck Clu and I had the computer lab booked!


I decided to have students create an original meme focused on one of the major themes we discussed from the novel. I was clear to tell that the meme was not about the novel, but rather dealing with a similar theme. I wanted their memes to be clever commentaries on life.


I shared a few memes that deal with the power struggles between children and their parents, unrealistic parent expectations, and the challenges of growing up. https://www.facebook.com/MommyMemes


Here’s a progression you can follow to guide students:


Step 1: Decide on a Theme

Ask students to identify a theme they want to focus on when they create their memes.


Step 2: Complete an Advanced Google Search

Show your students how to do an Advanced Google Search to look for images that have been labeled for reuse. Most students probably haven’t ever done an advance image search looking for images labeled for reuse. Unfortunately, many teens grab images online and reuse them without permission, so this is an important life lesson.

 

Step 3: Decide on an Image

Once they’ve decided on an image, have them save the picture to their device or take a screenshot.


Step 4: Upload the Image to a Google Drawing

Ask students to log into their Google Drive and create a new Google Drawing and upload their image. If you are using Google Classroom or Doctopus, you can create a Drawing for your students. If your students create their own Google Drawings, remind them to use a standard naming convention (e.g. Class Name – Last Name – Theme Meme).


Step 5: Add Clever Text! 

Ask student to add text to their image to create their memes. I reminded my students that their mix of media and text should send a clear and interesting message about their chosen theme."...



For original post, please click on title above or here: http://catlintucker.com/2015/02/create-original-theme-memes/ 

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Teens, Social Media & Technology Overview 2015 // Pew Research Center

Teens, Social Media & Technology Overview 2015 // Pew Research Center | Educational Psychology & Technology | Scoop.it

By Amanda Lenhart


"24% of teens go online “almost constantly,” facilitated by the widespread availability of smartphones.


Aided by the convenience and constant access provided by mobile devices, especially smartphones, 92% of teens report going online daily — including 24% who say they go online “almost constantly,” according to a new study from Pew Research Center. More than half (56%) of teens — defined in this report as those ages 13 to 17 — go online several times a day, and 12% report once-a-day use. Just 6% of teens report going online weekly, and 2% go online less often.


Much of this frenzy of access is facilitated by mobile devices. Nearly three-quarters of teens have or have access1 to a smartphone and 30% have a basic phone, while just 12% of teens 13 to 17 say they have no cell phone of any type. African-American teens are the most likely of any group of teens to have a smartphone, with 85% having access to one, compared with 71% of both white and Hispanic teens. These phones and other mobile devices have become a primary driver of teen internet use: Fully 91% of teens go online from mobile devices at least occasionally. Among these “mobile teens,” 94% go online daily or more often. By comparison, teens who don’t access the internet via mobile devices tend to go online less frequently. Some 68% go online at least daily.



For full post, click on title above or here:

http://www.pewinternet.org/2015/04/09/teens-social-media-technology-2015/ 

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Bridging Neuroscience & Education: Brain Learning Resource Roundup // Edutopia

Bridging Neuroscience & Education: Brain Learning Resource Roundup // Edutopia | Educational Psychology & Technology | Scoop.it
Browse a list of resources, articles, videos, and links for exploring the connection between education and neuroscience.


http://www.edutopia.org/article/brain-based-learning-resources

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Three Generations Answer Same Question About What They Did For Fun as a Kid

"Our relationship with nature is disappearing. That is what we found out when we talked to 3 generations and asked them one simple question: "What did you like to do for fun as a kid?"...

To view on Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=is5W6GxAI3c 


For a subset of articles related to Screen Time in the EdPsych/Tech collection check out: http://www.scoop.it/t/educational-psychology-technology?q=screen+time 

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For a subset of articles related to Screen Time in the EdPsych/Tech collection check out: http://www.scoop.it/t/educational-psychology-technology?q=screen+time 

Mark E. Deschaine, PhD's curator insight, August 1, 3:27 PM

For a subset of articles related to Screen Time in the EdPsych/Tech collection check out: http://www.scoop.it/t/educational-psychology-technology?q=screen+time 

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"Your Rubric Is a Hot Mess: Here’s How to Fix It" // Brilliant or Insane

"Your Rubric Is a Hot Mess: Here’s How to Fix It" // Brilliant or Insane | Educational Psychology & Technology | Scoop.it

By Jennifer Gonzalez

"See Mrs. Jones. She has a fantastic idea for a new assignment. It’s going to be challenging and engaging and fun. Before she can give this assignment to her students, Mrs. Jones needs to get a few things on paper. She starts by writing up a prompt. See Mrs. Jones smile as her fingers fly across the keyboard, crafting the language that describes what students will do.


Then it’s time to build a rubric. Watch as Mrs. Jones creates an empty table with four columns – one for each level of proficiency – and five rows that break down the areas that will be assessed. Four rows, five columns. Mrs. Jones prepares to fill all twenty cells.


See Mrs. Jones slump down in her chair.


If you’re like Mrs. Jones, you rely on densely packed analytic rubrics to assess student work. But creating these rubrics – trying to imagine every possible scenario that will result in an assignment being labeled as a 1, 2, 3 or 4, or whatever terminology might stand for those numbers – can be both soul-crushing and time-consuming.


Then, when it comes time to assess student work, you’re likely to find many assignments that don’t fit neatly into any one column.


What’s worse, others demonstrate qualities you didn’t even anticipate, like the student who spelled everything perfectly but was lax on punctuation. Your “mechanics” section doesn’t have a place for that.


And do students even read these rubrics? Having been on the receiving end of multi-page, multi-cell rubrics stuffed to the gills with 9-point font, I would say no. I did not read all of those cells. I looked at the third and fourth columns, where expectations met and exceeded expectations were described, and I did everything I could to make my work satisfy those criteria. The other two columns got little more than a glance."...


For main post, click on title above or here: http://www.brilliant-insane.com/2014/10/single-point-rubric.html 

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Motivation at a Glance: An ISchool Collaborative

Motivation at a Glance: An ISchool Collaborative | Educational Psychology & Technology | Scoop.it

"This project began as an independent study with Dr. Ruth Small, School of Information Studies, Syracuse University:  Develop a bibliography of theories of motivation along with citable notes for selected articles. For each theory, 8-10+ resources in the field of education and information studies were identified. A culminating project will be a synthesis or summary of what was learned and how it might apply to my research and dissertation.


Mind maps (Ability & Achievement and Task Value) for different aspects of the theories are in process. During the course of the study we enlisted the help of ExecDoc student Pat McKenna who concentrated her efforts on several theories including interest and curiosity. One of Dr. Ruth's students, Kristen Link, MSLIS, contributed her work for the Self-Fulfilling Prophecy Theory of Motivation. Dr. Ruth will invite her IST 617 graduate students to contribute to the site as part of their course work. Per Dr. Ruth's suggestion, we are building a data collection which will be used to interview theory experts. My own work on the site will continue beyond the completion of this independent study as part of my research focus. 88 theories have been identified."...


For full post, click on title above or here: 

https://sites.google.com/site/motivationataglanceischool/home

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The Brain with David Eagleman (Trailer) //Premieres October 14, 2015 on PBS

"Premieres Wednesdays, October 14-November 18, 10:00-11:00 p.m. ET on PBS.

Neuroscientist David Eagleman explores the human brain in an epic series that reveals the ultimate story of us, why we feel and think the things we do. This ambitious project blends science with innovative visual effects and compelling personal stories, and addresses some big questions. By understanding the human brain, we can come close to understanding humanity."

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cTl2Odxgr54

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Top 20 Principles from Psychology for PreK-12 Teaching and Learning // Coalition for Psychology in Schools and Education

Main page at: 

http://www.apa.org/ed/schools/cpse/top-twenty-principles.aspx

 

"Psychological science has much to contribute to enhancing teaching and learning in the everyday classroom by providing key insights on:

 

* Effective instruction

* Classroom environments that promote learning

* Appropriate use of assessment — including data, tests, measurement and research methods that inform practice.


We present here the most important principles from psychology — the Top 20 — that would be of greatest use in the context of pre-K to 12 classroom teaching and learning. We encourage consideration and practice of the Top 20 throughout all teacher preparation programs to ensure a solid foundation of psychological knowledge in pre-K to 12 instruction."

 

Download the full report (PDF 453KB) to find supporting research and learn why each principle is relevant in the classroom.  Click on title above or here: http://www.apa.org/ed/schools/cpse/top-twenty-principles.pdf

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The Learning Habit Study Finds That Media Use in Excess of 45 Minutes per Day Negatively Affects Children's Grades, Sleep, and Social Skills // PR NewsWire

The Learning Habit Study Finds That Media Use in Excess of 45 Minutes per Day Negatively Affects Children's Grades, Sleep, and Social Skills // PR NewsWire | Educational Psychology & Technology | Scoop.it

"PROVIDENCE, R.I., Sept. 2, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- 
The Learning Habit study  http://www.goodparentinc.com/learninghabit-studies/

examined family routines in 46,000 U.S. homes of children in grades K-12. The findings identify parenting style, media use, and grit as potent influences on children's academic success, sociability, and emotional well-being. After 45 minutes of media, children's grades, sleep, social skills, and emotional balance start to decline. After four hours, only 1% of children in middle school receive A's in mathematics and English Language Arts.

 

After four hours of screen time, children take 20 times longer to fall asleep than children with limited media use. Dr. Robert Pressman, Research Director of New England Center for Pediatric Psychology and lead researcher of the Learning Habit study said, "Recently, there have been strong suggestions about the need to limit children's screen time.  This is the first time we can make recommendations based on specific learning outcomes, such as a grade point average."

 

Published today in the American Journal of Family Therapy and in a book titled The Learning Habit, the research team from Brown University School of Medicine, Brandeis University, Children's National Medical Center and New England Center for Pediatric Psychology found that 'empowerment parenting' is more effective than 'traditional parenting' methods.  The largest psycho-social research study to look at the influence of the home environment on school-age children identified this parenting style as the most powerful influence on children's academic success. The Learning Habit study identified other factors of significance.

 

Additional Findings:


School: Nearly 38% of all primary school children depend on their parents to go to school to pick up forgotten items.  These figures fluctuate between the ages of five and nine, but remain at the 38% mark throughout the remaining school years. 

 

Parenting Style: Empowerment parenting, a style using thoughtful rules and effort-based praise to reward desired behavior, is most effective for developing grit and social skills.

 

Grit: Over 40% of parents' report that their child will quit when asked to perform a strenuous or difficult task.  Media use was found to have a detrimental effect on grit scores. 

 

Chores: Researchers indicate that habits regarding chores, studying, and media consumption do not change after of the age of nine, without parental intervention.  Two activities that influence grit scores in children are media use and household chores.

 

Homework: 10 minutes of homework per grade in school was positively correlated with children's GPA.  Excess time on academic homework showed no additional benefit."... 

 

For full post and link to original study, please click on title above or here: http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/the-learning-habit-study-finds-that-media-use-in-excess-of-45-minutes-per-day-negatively-affects-childrens-grades-sleep-and-social-skills-273539931.html

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Researchers Voice Concern Over E-Books' Effect on Reading Comprehension // EdWeek Digital Education

Researchers Voice Concern Over E-Books' Effect on Reading Comprehension // EdWeek Digital Education | Educational Psychology & Technology | Scoop.it

By Benjamin Herold (EdWeek)

"Digital devices and online reading materials are flooding U.S. schools, but there are some early reasons to worry whether they are helping children better learn to read.

That was the message from a husband-and-wife research team from West Chester University who presented two studies here as part of the annual conference of the American Educational Research Association.

The first study found that a small sample of students comprehended traditional books at "a much higher level" than they comprehended the same material when read on an iPad, said Heather Schugar, an assistant education professor at the university, located in southeastern Pennsylvania.

And the second study found that while students in 18 classrooms were "highly motivated by their interactions" with interactive e-books created using Apple's iBooks Author software, they "often skipped over text, where the meat of the information was."

The findings, presented as part of a panel on "Understanding Digital Literacy Practices," are part of a just-emerging body of new research on how students interact with and learn from the digital tablets and computers that are now prevalent in U.S. classrooms."...

For full post, click on title above or here: http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/DigitalEducation/2014/04/early_concerns_about_e-books_e_1.html

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Before You Hand Out Those Rewards - 4 Questions to Ask Yourself

Before You Hand Out Those Rewards - 4 Questions to Ask Yourself | Educational Psychology & Technology | Scoop.it

By Pernille Ripp

"I have been reward and punishment free for 5 years in my classroom.  I have loved it and yet rewards seem to still crop up every year, typically through school-wide initiatives or team decisions.  ...

 

http://pernillesripp.com/2015/06/12/before-you-hand-out-those-rewards-4-questions-to-ask-yourself/

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Highly Cited Educational Psychology and Technology Articles // Dr. Matthew J. Koehler

Highly Cited Educational Psychology and Technology Articles // Dr. Matthew J. Koehler | Educational Psychology & Technology | Scoop.it

By Dr. Matthew J. Koehler

"Below is a very incomplete list of journal articles cited more than 1,000 times related to educational psychology and educational technology. Next to each article is a count of the google citation count, and link to those citations."...

 

To access the list and Dr. Koehler's website, click on title above or here: 
http://www.matt-koehler.com/resources/highly-cited-educational-psychology-technology-articles/

 

 

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elearning at eCampus ULg's curator insight, June 16, 5:08 AM

En forme de "reader's digest", belle initiative que ce "classement" des articles les plus cités