Educational Leadership and Technology
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Technology increasing alienation of tertiary students

Technology increasing alienation of tertiary students | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
Technology use is at an all-time high for tertiary students, including through online courses, but many still yearn for face-to-face contact with staff and fellow students.

Via Peter Mellow, Miloš Bajčetić
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
Pedagogy remains important in teaching and learning. Teaching and education are about relational language and involves leading.
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Is Your District Future Ready? -- THE Journal

Is Your District Future Ready? -- THE Journal | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
Encouraging school leaders to think deeply about equity, agency and leadership when actualizing or revisioning technology integration plans.

Via Norton Gusky, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
Are we listening to classroom teachers? My experience suggests we are not. Change is just done to them.
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Norton Gusky's curator insight, April 20, 3:15 PM
T.H.E. Journal looks at the National Education Technology Plan as a tool to make school systems future ready.
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A Strong Case for Uncommon Learning

A Strong Case for Uncommon Learning | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
Eric Sheninger’s newest book, Uncommon Learning, explores the necessary changes our schools must make to be more relevant for students’ needs today.

Via Adrian Bertolini, diane gusa
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
An interesting concept is that good teachers teach the wrong things very well.

The teachers I am interviewing tell me that teaching and learning are only separated by a thin membrane which is very permeable. What does that mean in schools, for teaching, and for learning?
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Adrian Bertolini's curator insight, April 7, 8:13 PM
Technology is a tool to enhance learning outcomes, and when used appropriately, it is not the tool that matters, but the learning and experiences we can provide for our students that matter most.
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10 Tips for Teachers who Struggle with Technology

10 Tips for Teachers who Struggle with Technology | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
With technology moving out of the lab and into the classroom, it's becoming a challenge for some teachers to infuse their teaching with tech tools such as websites, educational games, simulations, ...

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I treated it like a game and worked to connect my use to what I already knew. For example, I learned Power Point because I had used Hyper Studio and had some idea of what might work.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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LET Team's curator insight, March 18, 2015 4:10 PM

Some good tips here, I particularly like LMGTFY...Let Me Google That For You...

Skrall Jashmirt's curator insight, March 19, 2015 10:34 AM
este tema me agrada por su alto contenido, el cual nos puede beneficiar tanto alumnos como maestros. ya que el uso de la tecnologia es muy muy benefico entre nosotros
MARÍA JOSEFINA AGUILAR LEO's curator insight, March 19, 2015 2:08 PM

Importantes aspects un Tomar en Cuenta párr Quienes ESTAMOS Interesados o HEMOS Incorporado el USO de la Tecnología en Nuestras aulas

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How to Find the Right Tech Talent (for the Non-Tech Entrepreneur)

How to Find the Right Tech Talent (for the Non-Tech Entrepreneur) | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
Finding qualified people to work on technology development is a challenge, so follow these tips to get your process started properly.

Via TechinBiz
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

We often confuse qualified with those who want to just add digital technology and their strategies. It has not worked well over the years in School.

 

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Kids And Screen Time: What Does The Research Say?

Kids And Screen Time: What Does The Research Say? | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it

Kids read emotions better after spending several days without electronic media, according to new research.

 

The UCLA researchers studied two groups of sixth-graders from a Southern California public school. One group was sent to the Pali Institute, an outdoor education camp in Running Springs, Calif., where the kids had no access to electronic devices. For the other group, it was life as usual.

 

At the beginning and end of the five-day study period, both groups of kids were shown images of nearly 50 faces and asked to identify the feelings being modeled. Researchers found that the students who went to camp scored significantly higher when it came to reading facial emotions or other nonverbal cues than the students who continued to have access to their media devices.


Via Pamir Kiciman
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

A worthwhile read. What are the challenges parents and teachers face as a result? Digital technology is here, but what can we do to help work with it mindfully?

 

@ivon_ehd1

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Lon Woodbury's curator insight, October 7, 2014 12:39 AM

As the comments say, there were too many variables so this study is not very reliable.  However, it does seem enough to warrant more and better studies.  -Lon

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Parents feel left behind by the accelerating pace of technology

Parents feel left behind by the accelerating pace of technology | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
They also wish that schools would make more effort with tech homework assignments that could include parents, and bring them and kids together in...

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Dean J. Fusto, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The pace of digital technology change is such that everyone is being left behind. It is important to develop skills which allow adaptation rather than mastery. The object is not to understand one type of digital technology, but to have skills that allow us to move from one to another as they emerge and work together.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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Elizabeth Hutchinson's curator insight, August 7, 2014 3:54 PM

No need to feel that you are being left behind. Get down to your library and we can explain it all. @SLS Guernseyeven runs courses for you to learn how to keep up. 

Nancy J. Herr's curator insight, August 9, 2014 8:40 AM

One of our biggest goals and challenges is excellent communication with and engagement of parents. Let's not leave them behind!

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Support "tech - shy" teachers to see the benefits of technology in their classroom

Support "tech - shy" teachers to see the benefits of technology in their classroom | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
Strategies to get your technology-shy teachers to take a chance on new tools.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

One thing that would be helpful is not to force digital technologies on good teachers. They need support and it can be provided by providing them with opportunities to plan their professional development. They other thing that is important is do not assume that resistance is being tech shy. I resisted, but am hardly tech shy. What I resisted was the external experts who thought they knew more about my teaching and students than I did.

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Marisol Pamela Hernández Orellana's curator insight, May 13, 2014 9:49 AM

Ninguna herramienta Tecnológica es infalible y ante ello siempre hay que tener un plan B...calma y asumir que navegamos en aguas caóticas que nos implicarán flexibilidad!!!!


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The Rise of the Super-Digital Native

The Rise of the Super-Digital Native | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it

The super-digital native will be bold. The super-digital native will be fearless. The super-digital native will be equipped with best practices for engaging critically with technology for teaching and learning.


Via EDTECH@UTRGV, Jamie Forshey, Lynnette Van Dyke, TechinBiz
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Reading Stuart Kaufman's work in complexity science suggests it might look quite different than this. He proposes that technology will come and go which means, as Marcus Wright suggests, we need to provide wisdom and understanding to the current generation so they can teach the next generation.

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aanve's curator insight, March 15, 2014 10:59 PM

www.aanve.com

 

Jamie Ruppert's curator insight, March 17, 2014 8:53 AM

Who are the super digital natives, anyway?

Rosemary Tyrrell's curator insight, March 17, 2014 1:58 PM

Somewhat Utopian, but interesting article. 

Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Technology in Business Today
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How Technology is helping us with our Education Today

How Technology is helping us with our Education Today | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
Technology in Education
An infographic focusing on the theme of Technology in Education.
How different types of technology help students to learn more and more
efficiently, Also how social media,

Via TechinBiz
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Technology is helpful, but does not replace the human touch of a good teacher. It requires thoughtful and mindful decisions based on context to make education work.

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Lori Wilk's curator insight, January 11, 2014 12:26 PM

Very helpful information

Deborah Rinio's curator insight, January 13, 2014 12:12 PM

Check out this infographic about the changing use of technology in education.

Professor Jill Jameson's curator insight, January 14, 2014 9:51 PM

Useful infographic

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Intel Sees a Future Where We Will Form “Relationships” with Our Gadgets: Scientific American

Intel Sees a Future Where We Will Form “Relationships” with Our Gadgets: Scientific American | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
Company cultural anthropologist Genevieve Bell tells us to get ready to take our fondness for smartphones, tablets and other devices to the next level

Via Sharrock, Lynnette Van Dyke
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

This has some scary implications. Will we know how to unplug?

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Sharrock's curator insight, October 15, 2013 10:13 AM

Interesting quote: "We talk about it as though it was one world, but we’ve truthfully been in a world of multiple Internets for at least a decade, even if you just talk about it in terms of physical infrastructure. [South] Korea has true two-way Internet—high-speed uploading and high-speed downloading, no throttle. On the other hand, in places like Australia download is a seven-to-one ratio to upload, which means it’s much easier to consume content than it is to create and share it. That means the Internet feels different [to people in different places]."

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Integrating Tech into the Classroom - Great resources and tutorials from Gooru Learning

Integrating Tech into the Classroom - Great resources and tutorials from Gooru Learning | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Dan Kirsch
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Gooru looks like a useful tool.

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Siri Anderson's curator insight, May 9, 2013 10:58 AM

Fantastic resource for finding content that operates at various levels.

Tom Perran's curator insight, May 9, 2013 12:07 PM

Everyone should bookmark, scoop, pin or retweet this!

Ness Crouch's curator insight, May 23, 2013 4:37 PM

Wow! If this is as good as it looks I think this would make organising learning for younger children easier. I'll have to check it out in more detail though

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Confessions of a Luddite professor

Confessions of a Luddite professor | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
I had the good fortune on Wednesday to hear economist Robert Gordon talk about his magnum opus, “The Rise and Fall of American Economic Growth.” Gordon has a somber tale to tell. He argues that U.S. economic growth ain’t what it used to be, and that ain’t gonna change over the next 25 years. This is due to myriad headwinds such as demographic slowdowns, rising inequality, fiscal constraints, and — most important — the failure of newer technologies to jumpstart economic growth the way that the Second Industrial Revolution did.

[U.S. economy slows, with GDP growing 0.5% in first quarter]

It’s his last point — about the effect of information technology on productivity — that prompts so much fierce debate. Economists are furiously debating whether the visible innovations in the information sector are leading to productivity advances that are going undetected in the current productivity statistics. On the one hand, the aggregate data suggests a serious productivity slowdown over the past decade. On the other hand, Google’s chief economist, Hal Varian, insists that “there is a lack of appreciation for what’s happening in Silicon Valley, because we don’t have a good way to measure it.”

Surely, there are sectors, such as higher education, in which technological innovations can yield significant productivity gains, right? All that talk about MOOCs and flipped classrooms and the like will make a difference in productivity, yes?

As an optimist, I’ve long resisted Gordon’s argument — but this is one area where I’m beginning to suspect that he’s right and Silicon Valley is wrong.

Via Miloš Bajčetić
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
Data is raw information that has to be interpreted and judged as to what it means. The risk we run with digital technologies, including the Internet, is that we present data as meaningful without thoughtful consideration. It is why teachers remain vital to the educational enterprise.
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The Ideology of the Blockchain (for Education)

The Ideology of the Blockchain (for Education) | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
All digital technology is ideological. All education technology is ideological.

I repeat this (and quite often, it seems) because technology – and ed-tech in particular – is too frequently discussed as though it is ideology-free. It purports to be at once (and, yet, incongruously) both neutral and necessary. It presents itself at once as value-free (and, yet, incongruously) progressive. That is to say, if technology contains any ideological underpinning at all, we’re supposed to believe, it’s that its forward march is quite inevitable; but that’s okay as it is forward movement – technology serves to make the world better.

This sort of end-of-history, post-ideology ideology that permeates digital technologies (conveniently) frames challenges and criticisms and questions as “ideological” in which “ideological” here means politically-loaded, polemical, biased, bad.

That’s not what I mean when I write that digital technology is ideological or that education technology is ideological. I don’t mean simply that these are interwoven with a certain politics or that they represent developments that I find personally disagreeable. Rather, “ideology” as I use the word refers to the ideas, values, and practices – discourse and power – grounded in the forces of production (e.g. global capitalism) and in the institutions that re-inscribe these. “Ideology” is one way we can think about social struggles, especially as various groups try to legitimate their own interests and do so in such a way that their ideas, values, and practices are seen as natural.

Technologies, particularly the new computer and communications technologies of the twentieth century onward, help reinforce dominant ideology in powerful ways, but these technologies also have their own ideological underpinnings as well, ones that serve in turn to justify and reinforce the cultural and economic changes that society is currently undergoing. Think “Sharing Economy,” for example. This is also, in part at least, what Neil Postman famously described over twenty years ago as the growing pervasiveness of “Technopoly”:

Technopoly eliminates alternatives to itself in precisely the way Aldous Huxley outlined in Brave New World. It does not make them illegal. It does not make them immoral. It does not even make them unpopular. It makes them invisible and therefore irrelevant. And it does so by redefining what we mean by religion, by art, by family, by politics, by history, by truth, by privacy, by intelligence, so that our definitions fit its new requirements. Technopoly, in other words, is totalitarian technocracy.

Via Miloš Bajčetić
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
This is a series of articles that deal with the use of digital technologies in schools. What does it mean? The articles draw on new (Neil Selwyn) thinkers and some that were writing at the early stages of the digital revoluation (Neil Postman). However, you can go back further and read concerns expressed by Heidegger, Arendt, Gadamer, Derrida, etc. and more recently: Turkle and others.

Technology is a conversation between a craftsperson and their tools.
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This Time – Technology Matters but Teachers Still Matter More!

This Time – Technology Matters but Teachers Still Matter More! | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
Tom D'Amico, the Superintendent of Human Resources with the Ottawa Catholic School Board, discusses how his district has met the needs of today's digital learner by focusing on the relationship and scaling of personal networks. Teachers do not dump kids in front of devices. Instead they receive yearly instruction on digital citizenship to model behaviors for students and use researched-based practices to help students learn.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Teachers are who vivify topics and learning.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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Digital, connected and mobile

Digital, connected and mobile | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it

"In today’s digitally connected world, using technology to improve education institutions and processes is not a question of if, but of when and how.

Strategic technology suggested:

1. Adaptive learning

2 Adaptive e-textbooks

3. Customer relationship management (CRM)

4. Big data

5. Sourcing strategies

6. Exostructure

7. Open microcredentials

8. Digital assessment

9. Mobile

10. Social learning


Via Leona Ungerer, Lynnette Van Dyke
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

It is more a question of how. There is a lot of neo-liberal thinking in this article i.e relationship management. Is that what we want?

 

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Germany: No more work emails after 6pm

Germany: No more work emails after 6pm | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
Checking emails after work hours is so bad for your psychological state that Germany is considering banning it altogether.

Via TechinBiz
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Is this the way to approach this complex issue? What about common sense prevailing?

 

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Technology in the Classroom: What Happens When It Fails?

Technology in the Classroom: What Happens When It Fails? | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
Technology in the Classroom: What Happens When It Fails?

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , The Rice Process
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Sometimes the learning does not happen. Certainly, teachers need to explore their role, but sometimes students make decisions that make it difficult for learning to happen. In the end, learning is a student responsibility and teaching is about inviting students into an environment where this can happen and the learning is somehow meaningful for teachers and students.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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Randy Moon's curator insight, September 9, 2014 8:55 PM

Whew!

Melissa Marshall's curator insight, September 9, 2014 9:20 PM

 'In the end, learning is a student responsibility and teaching is about inviting students into an environment where this can happen.'

Daniel C. Renson's curator insight, September 10, 2014 5:38 AM

and what about the large interactive board?

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The evolution of computers in the classroom

The evolution of computers in the classroom | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
The proliferation of tablets maybe the most revolutionary addition of technology in the classroom, but the path was paved with other tools. PostTV took a detailed look at some of the milestones in classroom technology from the past several decades:

Via Dennis T OConnor, James J. Goldsmith, Dean J. Fusto, Bonnie Bracey Sutton
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

This is an interesting time line and history. Where innovations in digital technologies were spaced out over years now impactful ones are emerging yearly. Somehow the pace does not seem to be slowing. What that means in School is an important and ongoing question.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, July 21, 2014 4:54 AM

I've lived this timeline. Tablets are another stop on the Oregon Trail of Tech I've seen come and go.  


Indeed, tablets are so two hours ago... I'm surprised this timeline misses a little development called mobile learnig. 

Training Aspirants's curator insight, August 7, 2014 5:06 AM

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When parents are the ones too distracted by devices

When parents are the ones too distracted by devices | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it

Having a teenager lost in his or her cellphone — texting friends and communicating with parents in monosyllabic grunts — has become a trope of the Internet age. But teens are not the only ones distracted by their devices.

Many parents have the same problem. As much as I hate to admit it, I'm one of them.

A couple weeks ago, my 12-year-daughter, Ella, staged an intervention. She and my wife basically threatened to take my phone and break it.

"Sometimes at night you'll just stand around and ... you'll have your phone out and you'll just type and you'll just stand there," Ella says.

Ella can be a brutal mimic. And as she describes my distraction, she strikes up my smartphone pose: the phone balanced against my belly — thumbs madly typing away — (as if by holding the phone that way no one will notice that I'm on it).

"Lila's ready to go to bed, everybody's trying to get people to read to them and you're just standing there in the middle of the hallway reading your texts and texting other people," she adds.

Hearing from my oldest that I'm ignoring her little sister stings.

"Has that gotten worse?" I ask.

"It hasn't really changed; it got worse when we moved to California," Ella says.

That was when I started covering technology.

"Do you feel jealous of my cellphone? Do you get mad at it?" I ask.

That earns an eye roll and a laugh.

"No, why would I get jealous of a cellphone?"

"I don't know," I say. "Do you feel like you are competing for attention?"

"Yeah."

With that she wins the argument.

And Ella isn't the only kid who feels this way about her parent's relationship with devices.

, a clinical and consulting psychologist at Harvard, recently wrote . For her book, Steiner-Adair interviewed more than 1,000 kids from the ages of 4 to 18. She talked to hundreds of teachers and parents.

"One of the many things that absolutely knocked my socks off," she says, "was the consistency with which children — whether they were 4 or 8 or 18 or 24 — talked about feeling exhausted and frustrated and sad or mad trying to get their parents' attention, competing with computer screens or iPhone screens or any kind of technology, much like in therapy you hear kids talk about sibling rivalry."

Steiner-Adair says one of the challenges we all face is that these devices are wired to grab our attention and keep it. She says the most successful apps are popular, even addictive, because they in our brains.

"Yes, when you are plugged into your screen the part of your brain that lights up is the to-do list," Steiner-Adair says. "Everything feels urgent — everything feels a little exciting. We get a little dopamine hit when we accomplish another email — check this, check that. And when a child is waiting by or comes into your room and it's one of those mini-moments and you don't know — that's the hard thing about parenting — you don't know if this is the ordinary question or they're coming with something really important. It's very hard as a grown-up to disengage and give them your attention with the [same] warmth that you give them, the same tone of voice that you greet them if they interrupt you when you're scrambling eggs."

A couple of years ago, my daughter got a laptop for school. And because she was becoming more independent, we got her a phone. We set up rules for when she could use this stuff and when she'd need to put it away. We created a charging station, outside her bedroom, where she had to plug in these devices every night. Basically — except for homework — she has to put it all away when she comes home.

Steiner-Adair says most adults don't set up similar limits in their own lives.

"We've lost the boundaries that protect work and family life," she says. "So it is very hard to manage yourself and be as present to your children in the moments they need you."

Steiner-Adair says that whether you are a parent or not, carving out time to turn off your devices — to disconnect from the wired world and engage with the real people who are all around you — is one of the best gifts you can give yourself and the people your love.

After my daughter's little intervention, I made myself a promise to create my own charging station. To plug my phone in — somewhere far away — when I am done working for the day. I've been trying to leave it there untouched for most of the weekend.

And while I still find myself reaching for it — or checking my pocket — leaving my phone behind is also kind of freeing. Last weekend, instead of checking Twitter and reading tech blogs I built a treehouse.


Via Vilma Bonilla
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Adults face tech challenges. I know school managers who cannot greet someone properly due to their inability to look away from their PDA. Is that example we want for children?

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Vilma Bonilla's curator insight, April 17, 2014 4:03 PM

The importance of disengagement and setting up boundaries. - "Parents often complain that smartphones keep their kids distracted from conversation. What happens when it's the other way around, when kids can't get their smartphone-glued parents' attention?"

Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from iGeneration - 21st Century Education (Pedagogy & Digital Innovation)
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Assessment & Teaching of 21st-Century Skills - great resources, white papers, and resource kits


Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Who is designing these products?

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Ness Crouch's curator insight, January 14, 2014 9:27 PM

Great resources. 

holbel mendez's curator insight, January 15, 2014 9:38 PM

"Learn about the critical skills students need to be successful in the digital age and beyond"

Lisa Marie Blaschke's curator insight, January 16, 2014 6:04 AM

Good resource for information on the skills needed by today's learners.

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The Teacher's Guides To Technology And Learning - Edudemic

The Teacher's Guides To Technology And Learning - Edudemic | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
We've gone through hundreds of resources to assemble these guides which are meant to help you learn, teach, and share as much as possible.
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I don't know if they are all helpful in Canada, but some will be.

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17 Tech Terms Connected Educators Must Know - Edudemic

17 Tech Terms Connected Educators Must Know - Edudemic | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
Time to update your virtual vocabulary! These tech terms are important for all connected educators to know about.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

This is an interesting infographic.

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N Kaspar's curator insight, August 8, 2013 11:20 AM

I like the glassed up idea.

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How Many Teachers Use Technology in the Classroom?

How Many Teachers Use Technology in the Classroom? | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
Remember the good old days of reading textbooks in school and taking notes from a chalkboard? Yeah, neither do we. PBS Learning Media, in preparation for Digital Learning Day on... (RT @dp_geopol: How Many Teachers Use Technology in the Classroom?

Via Digital Georgia
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

This is definitely an important question. What uses do they have for technology? What criteria helps them make decisions?

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