Educational Leadership and Technology
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Education vs Learning - What Exactly is the Difference? - EdTechReview™ (ETR)

Education vs Learning - What Exactly is the Difference? - EdTechReview™ (ETR) | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
Surely learning and formal education are not entirely the same thing? But what exactly is the difference?

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Aki Puustinen, Suvi Salo
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

There are two intertwined definitions of education and only one is included here. Educare is leading students out of child. Educere is allowing students to gain control over their learning and realizing they have support when needed. We have eliminated the latter replacing it with the instrumental version called learning which is what School is about.

 

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Terry Doherty's curator insight, August 9, 2014 10:51 AM

Nice comparisons and contrasts to make understanding easier.

Ness Crouch's curator insight, April 15, 2015 7:51 PM

Excellent read. I recommend taking a look at this article. Sometimes the lines between education and learning can be blurry. Time to clear that up.

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12 Changes Coming To The Future Of Learning - Edudemic

12 Changes Coming To The Future Of Learning - Edudemic | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
The future of learning is exciting, filled with innovative ideas, and no one in their right mind knows more than that. Anyone who says otherwise is pulling your leg.

Via Grant Montgomery, Kent Wallén, Aki Puustinen, Suvi Salo
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The reorganizing and reconstructing (a great John Dewey word taking us beyond reorganizing) of School is long overdue. I think we will have to be aware and present in our teaching so as to utilize the most effective means for the learning at hand and the students involved in that learning.

 

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What will the future of education look like? | Anthropology in Practice, Scientific American Blog Network

What will the future of education look like? | Anthropology in Practice, Scientific American Blog Network | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
Scientific American’s August supplement takes a look at the changing landscape of education in the face of emerging technology, and asks the question, how do we ...

Via Lynnette Van Dyke
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I do not view School and education as the same thing. Education is a much broader and comprehensive rubric which potentially includes School, but does not necessarily have to.

 

The second paragraph pushes towards what is outlined above and that is important, however with a caveat. The caveat is that we have corporate interests involved in determining what School looks like and it does not follow that education follows the same path.

 

A second point is the professor from Washington University is not shedding new light on the idea that rote and memorization are not the ways approach good pedagogy and learning.

 

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Is There Such a Thing as Social Media Overload?

Is There Such a Thing as Social Media Overload? | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
You'd be surprised by how many hours you may spend plugged into social media.

Via craig daniels
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
There is and it is not just amongst the students. I watched "educators" who used digital technologies and social media far more than they should have. Adults can set the example and help students gain insight into using digital technologies and social media in healthy ways. @ivon_ehd1
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Why you need to feed your brain different experiences

Why you need to feed your brain different experiences | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it

When Ernest Hemingway would stand at his desk, he had a funny habit as he wrote: when he was working on the tough bits he'd write in his boyish, punctuation-disregarding longhand. Once the juice started to flow, he'd switch to the typewriter.

Hemingway was moving between unmediated and mediated work: the pencil to his page was unmediated, the typewriter mediated. The analog helped to find flow, the mediated helped find efficiency.

As Clive Thompson, the author of Smarter Than You Think: How Technology Is Changing Our Minds for the Better, would argue, working in analog or mediated ways changes how our brains and thoughts behave: anyone who's ever received a serendipitous answer from someone on Twitter has experienced how technology can amplify our social thinking, while at the same time if you've put off your projects because you're fiddling on Facebook, you know much tech can distract us--to the point of changing the structure of our brains.

The point Thompson makes in the book isn't that online is good and offline is bad, but that we need to have different sorts of stimulation in order to have the best ideas. Our brains get easily distracted when we do one thing again and again. Just as it's unhealthy to eat only one kind of food all the time, you shouldn't have one kind of stimuli for your work.

Thompson has a term for this kind mindfulness of media: cognitive diversity. As he explained to Psychology Today:

    If you're a person that works with words all day long like I do it’s really good to do something completely nonverbal in your spare time. I’m an instrumentalist, so I’ll play guitar for half an hour at the end of the day and it’s a fabulous way to put my brain in a totally different embodied state.  I often come away from it having solved some sort of problem. And it is very emotionally valuable as well, which exercises whole other parts of my personality.
     
    These are all things that are connected to the quality of our overall lives and thinking.  Knowing when to shift between public and private thinking--when to blast an idea online, when to let it slow bake--is a crucial new skill: cognitive diversity.

Why is this so important? Because, Thompson says, doing things that are different than the keyboard-hammering so many of us spend our days with drags our minds into different modes of thought.

Reading immersed, going for long walks, arguing with your friend at a bar: these throw our minds into new environments, allowing the problems we've been thinking so hard on to hang out in our subconscious for a while and bump into other ideas.

It's the same reason we get ideas in the shower, he says: When you spend most of your time with one technology, you'll be limiting yourself to the way of thinking that technology encourages.

The challenge for us thought-loaded screen-faces, then, is to find ways to get our faces in front of other forms of life, be they paintings, forests, or curries. Then our thinking can have, like Hemingway, a little more character.

 


Via Vilma Bonilla
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

We need diversity in our living and learning. Schools and education should be about the novel, the strange, and the diverse.

 

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The Rise of New Institutional Models and Architectures

The Rise of New Institutional Models and Architectures | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
Smart organizations are encouraging, not fighting, the heaving growth of massive online communities. The rise of new institutional models and architectures
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I am always interested in what Tapscott has to say and not because I agree with what he says. I tend to think about what he says critically and question my own assumptions and what he says in the process.

 

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Flipping the Online Classroom – One Professor’s Unique Approach

Flipping the Online Classroom – One Professor’s Unique Approach | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
Technique for Flipping Online Course may Provide Glimpse into Online Learning's Future In my ongoing reading and research into flipped teaching and learning, I

Via Chris Carter
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

You don't really flip teaching and learning. What is flipped is the way teaching and learning happen. Students ready themselves differently before coming to class which means teachers prepare differently, as well.

 

Having said this, integrating different pedagogic forms into one's teaching and student learning can only be good when done well. I think that is the key point in the article.

 

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Chris Carter's curator insight, August 4, 2014 3:56 PM

Honest, lucid, inspiring

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Why Is Innovation So Hard?

Why Is Innovation So Hard? | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
By Edward D. Hess What business today does not want to be more innovative? In business parlance, “innovation” has reached a glorified position—like “customer centricity,” it is deemed to be a strategic necessity. But it is hard to define.  It means different things to different people. Innovation exists along a continuum, [...]
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I was at the Alexander Graham Bell Museum today and was struck by the idea that innovation is not a noun. We treat it as something static, but it should be active and dynamic. People like Bell, Edison, Curie, etc. are great examples of people who were pushing boundaries.

 

The challenge in School is we have created echo chambers where we agree with one another and little ever changes. When creativity rears its head the reformers, politicians, bureaucrats, and technocrats push it back down.

 

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Learnification

Learnification | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
We now have young learners and very young learners, lea…
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The article includes a bibliography with Gert Biesta and others. That makes it worthwhile as Biesta is critical of 21st Century School and its neo-liberal agenda including the use of digital technologies.

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Communicating with parents in the digital world

Communicating with parents in the digital world | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
This post was written by Erin Dye, a ClassDojo Thought Partner who works in professional development at Green Light Learning





Gone are the days when you only had access to parents via one-way monthly newsletters or twice-a-year parent teacher conferences. Thanks to technology you can easily keep in touch with your students’ parents all year-round.


Here are some tips to get your communicating with parents in the digital world: 





Keep a Class Blog


Rather than sending home a monthly or weekly newsletter to parents that might never make it out of the bottom of your students’ backpacks, try starting a class blog. Set a schedule for posting and share that schedule with parents. Allow moderated comments on the posts to get parents involved with the classroom.


Have your students do most of the blogging. Assign one student a week to be the class chronicler. Have that student take photos, record interviews with other students, and summarize what the class learned. Weebly is an easy platform for students of all ages to use.     


Get your class blog linked to your school’s homepage to show all the exciting work your class is doing!


Use a Messaging Service


Sending individual texts or emails to parents is time consuming and not very private. Let a messaging service, such as ClassDojo Messenger, do all the work for you. Once students and parents opt into the system, it allows you to easily send text message blasts to update all parents at once, or you can privately message them to keep them up-to-date on their child’s progress. You don’t see their phone numbers and they don’t see yours. This is a great option for families who may not have home Internet but do have smartphones.


Set Up a Class Social Media Account


If parents don’t want to have their phones buzzing all the time, consider starting a class Twitter account or Facebook page. You can use the page to share updates, photos, and links to student work. If your students are under 13, be sure to set the account to private. To view the page, all parents will need to have Twitter or Facebook accounts (many of them probably already do). Before setting up any class social media accounts, review your school’s Privacy Policy and check with administrators.


Make Parents Feel Welcome


Let parents know that your classroom is a welcome space for them. Consider inviting parents to your classroom on days when students are giving presentations or sharing projects. Working parents can use Skype or Google Hangouts to visit virtually.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Use of social media is important, but the key is good choices and uses. One so-called expert, who spent little time in the classroom, suggests Twitter is a great tool to report learning results to parents. It has never been clear how 140 characters will accomplish that. It is important to use social media and other tools artfully.

 

The key takeaway is letting parents know the classroom environment is welcoming. I took it a step further and invited parents into classroom and provided meaningful ways for them to engage when there.

 

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Audrey Menard's curator insight, August 3, 2014 5:20 PM

Great ideas!

Colette Cole-Saner's curator insight, August 4, 2014 9:53 AM

For beginners, many good suggestions are offered to optimize communication.

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The power of digital student portfolios

The power of digital student portfolios | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it

With the spreading use of computers and mobile technology in schools, going digital with student portfolios has become more popular. Simply put, digital portfolios are online collections of student work. They allow us to archive, curate and analyze samples of student learning from both the past and the present and keep that data — literally — at the tip of our finger.


Via Nik Peachey, Nicholas Fragkias
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Good portfolios, whether digital or hard versions or hybrids, are important in teaching and learning.

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Mauricio Fierro's curator insight, August 2, 2014 10:26 AM

The power of digital student portfolios

Mirta Liliana Filgueira's curator insight, August 2, 2014 10:21 PM

El uso de los portafolios Digitales

Fiona Harvey's curator insight, August 3, 2014 3:28 PM

Interesting article around eportfolio's

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New Zealand school plans microchip bracelets to encourage "good behaviour"

New Zealand school plans microchip bracelets to encourage "good behaviour" | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
Fairfax Media reports: 'A North Canterbury school's plan to fit students with microchip bracelets to track their behaviour has prompted concern among parents. Swannanoa School wants to use silicon ...
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

New Zealand's School system might be different, but my Alberta-based experience is that the idea that this many parents are opposed to an idea is not an obstacle for educationalists. Secondly, the cost cited is start-up and does not include maintaining and upgrading. A last point is that this is like an ankle bracelet for people on parole. Is that what think school is--a prison environment?

 

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The evolution of computers in the classroom

The evolution of computers in the classroom | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
The proliferation of tablets maybe the most revolutionary addition of technology in the classroom, but the path was paved with other tools. PostTV took a detailed look at some of the milestones in classroom technology from the past several decades:

Via Dennis T OConnor, James J. Goldsmith, Dean J. Fusto, Bonnie Bracey Sutton
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

This is an interesting time line and history. Where innovations in digital technologies were spaced out over years now impactful ones are emerging yearly. Somehow the pace does not seem to be slowing. What that means in School is an important and ongoing question.

 

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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, July 21, 2014 4:54 AM

I've lived this timeline. Tablets are another stop on the Oregon Trail of Tech I've seen come and go.  


Indeed, tablets are so two hours ago... I'm surprised this timeline misses a little development called mobile learnig. 

Training Aspirants's curator insight, August 7, 2014 5:06 AM

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What Are the Most Powerful Uses of Tech for Learning?

What Are the Most Powerful Uses of Tech for Learning? | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
The digital divide is not just about access to devices -- a disparity in powerful uses of technology could be even more difficult to overcome.

Via Lynnette Van Dyke
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The divides existing in School are not being reduced with digital technologies. Teaching will be helping students choose the best tool for that particular learning situation and context.

 

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E-learning pedagogy–fact or fiction?

E-learning pedagogy–fact or fiction? | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
I’ve been thinking a bit recently about pedagogy, and in particular the idea of an online or e-learning pedagogy. Teachers I work with all want PD in e-learning pedagogy. Sounds reasonable, doesn’t...

Via Päivi Jauhola
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Pedagogy is the art and science of teaching, I am not sure we have to reinvent it per se. What we might need to do is modify practice given the set of circumstances faced. This means some principles might overlap various media; whereas others may not. We will have to be more aware, present in our teaching.

 

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Computers & Education.


Via Dan Kirsch
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
It might not be an either/or situation i.e. computer teacher or integrating teaching computer use in classrooms. It might be working in ways that allow both to exist and complement. @ivon_ehd1
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Dan Kirsch's curator insight, August 6, 2014 1:19 PM
The research interest here begs the question is there still a need for a full-time a computer teacher in the K-12 education or not? Essentially, with integrated technology within K-12 classrooms is need for a computer teacher obsolete? Should schools hire technology integrationists in the future? We are of the perspective that there is STILL a need for a computer teacher as well as an integrationist.
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How Much Technology in the Classroom Should Be Allowed? Is too Much a Bad Thing? - EdTechReview™ (ETR)

How Much Technology in the Classroom Should Be Allowed? Is too Much a Bad Thing? - EdTechReview™ (ETR) | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
Examine what technologies are proposed for the classroom environment, where they come from, and what their effects are on the students.

Via Yashy Tohsaku
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The Distracted Generation Infographic

The Distracted Generation Infographic | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it

Distracted Generation Infographic We live in a fast-paced and modern world. Children today are exposed to so many stimuli, and have so many ways to consume both entertainment and knowledge. In a world with so many distractions, how do we keep children focused on reading? Create A Passion For The... http://elearninginfographics.com/distracted-generation-infographic/


Via elearninginfographic, Dean J. Fusto, Suvi Salo, Bonnie Bracey Sutton
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Are all children and youth more distracted? Yes, there may be more choices and children will need to treat choices like samplers they can take time with and savour each sample long enough to know if it is something that appeals to them. For that, they will need responsible adults in their lives i.e. teachers and parents.

 

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Dialogue and discussion: critical for 21st century skills development

Dialogue and discussion: critical for 21st century skills development | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Dialogue and discussion are two different forms of communication. Dialogue is one where ideas flow and there can be heightened awareness given the right circumstances. We listen to listen rather than listening to answer. Discussion is more like debate and is about listening to respond. Similar to lecturing, the two have roles to play when well-integrated in pedagogic work.

 

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6 Reasons to Promote 21st Century Skills vs 21st Century Tech

6 Reasons to Promote 21st Century Skills vs 21st Century Tech | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
      “Any educator that aims at completeness must be at once theoretical and practical, intellectual and moral.” Aldous Huxley, Words and Their Meaning, 1940. There are many skills ...

Via Lynnette Van Dyke
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Technology is the artful discourse about the use of tools. We are not teaching technology. We are teaching the artful use of the tools used and they come in many forms i.e. digital and discursive. Discursive technologies are the policies and curricula that guide the teaching and when they arrive in classrooms they are part of complex conversations teachers and students engage in.

 

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Durriyyah Kemp's curator insight, August 5, 2014 2:13 PM

This article is very important!  It details so many points that I've been stressing to teachers recently.  The 21st century skills are the skills that are essential for our students to be successful in a global society.  They are also the skills that many employers indicate are missing when young people the workforce.  These skills are essential. 

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Some readings on networked learning

Some readings on networked learning | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
What follows is some ad hoc thoughts and reflections upon the somewhat ad hoc collection of readings (Kligyte, 2009; Bonzo & Parchoma, 2010; Bell, 2010) around networked learning from Week 1 of...
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The article contains references to articles and authors I am unfamiliar with so that makes it interesting.

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In the Bustling, Interactive Classroom, A Place for Digital Games

In the Bustling, Interactive Classroom, A Place for Digital Games | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
Teachers can use games as a supplement that enables increased one-on-one learning between teacher and student.
[[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more!

Via Yashy Tohsaku
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Integrating games into classrooms, teaching, and learning would help students in finding complementary ways forward in their learning.

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The Future Of Higher Education Depends On Innovation

The Future Of Higher Education Depends On Innovation | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
Technology and innovation are creating increasingly attractive options and alternatives to existing systems of education, and consumers are learning how to take advantage of those.

Via Suvi Salo
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The future of all education, read School, requires innovation and innovative people and environments where those people thrive. It is not just about technology, I assume this is digital technologies, but that will be important.

 

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Are You A Tech-Savvy Teacher, This Infographic Will Tell You | TechFaster

Are You A Tech-Savvy Teacher, This Infographic Will Tell You | TechFaster | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
Through the course of our “summer school” here at Techfaster we’ve met plenty of tech savvy educators. From ISTE in early July to the NAESP show and Campus Tech that wrapped up this week, teachers, administrators and education enthusiasts were learning, sharing, and networking with each other. These are definitely the tech savvy teacher type, and that’s validated in the infographic below from Daily Genius. But just because you spent part of the summer at EdTech conferences doesn’t necessarily mean you are a tech savvy teacher. Of course the reverse is true as well, maybe you had family events and your own kids to tend to during the summer. Are you a tech savvy teacher? A strong indicator would be that you’re even reading this article here at techfaster.com. Are you keeping your students, parents, fellow teachers and administrators up to date with the goings on in your classroom with your own blog? That’s a good sign you’re a tech savvy teacher. Just think about what the communication you can have with a blog, would have been like in the days of the ditto machine? You would have to plan out your thoughts, outline them, create a ditto original, print them, pass them out to students, and just pray they didn’t end up on the floor of the school bus. Are you networking with other teachers you’ve never met on Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest or a knowledge sharing educational site? Are you regularly attending edtech chat or listening to podcasts? All of these are signs that you care about your own professional development, living in current times and caring about your students. YouTube, Twitter, SnapChat, Minecraft, Instagram, and Vine are all a part of your students lives. Facebook, Pinterest and email are all a part of your students’ parents’ lives. You’re almost too far behind if you’re not a “tech savvy” teacher. Check out the infographic below and see how you stack up.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , juandoming, Suvi Salo
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

We should not confuse being "tech savvy" with having a blog, doing your PD online, knowing the vocabulary, etc. PD is something that is best integrated between many delivery methods, including digital. Knowing the vocabulary does not mean anything. I know teachers who speak Covey all the time and do not know what it means. They know the vocabulary. A key question is what does tech savvy mean?

 

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anne walker's curator insight, August 3, 2014 11:37 AM

Some Tech-Savvy goals worth aiming towards.

arveen kaur's curator insight, August 3, 2014 11:24 PM

Yall should know

PaolaRicaurte's curator insight, August 4, 2014 11:06 AM

Professional routines for Tech-savvy teachers, but also useful for tech-savvy students: creation of Personal Learning Networks, belonging to learning communities, using technology for the co-production of knowledge...

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Vision Report: Teachers Eager for More Tech in Classrooms

Vision Report: Teachers Eager for More Tech in Classrooms | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
The 2014 Vision K-20 Survey Report, just released by the Software & Information Industry Association (SIIA), highlights the fact that instructors are eager to move towards integrating more technology into the classrooms, especially when it comes to...

Via Dean J. Fusto, Bonnie Bracey Sutton
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Are we sure about these findings? What does it mean that teacher demands outstrip institutional capacity?

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