Educational Leadership and Technology
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TCEA 2013: Teacher development and school improvement

TCEA 2013: Teacher development and school improvement | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
eClassroom News
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School improvement is needed but should not be linked to narrow corporate interests.

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Confessions of a Luddite professor

Confessions of a Luddite professor | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
I had the good fortune on Wednesday to hear economist Robert Gordon talk about his magnum opus, “The Rise and Fall of American Economic Growth.” Gordon has a somber tale to tell. He argues that U.S. economic growth ain’t what it used to be, and that ain’t gonna change over the next 25 years. This is due to myriad headwinds such as demographic slowdowns, rising inequality, fiscal constraints, and — most important — the failure of newer technologies to jumpstart economic growth the way that the Second Industrial Revolution did.

[U.S. economy slows, with GDP growing 0.5% in first quarter]

It’s his last point — about the effect of information technology on productivity — that prompts so much fierce debate. Economists are furiously debating whether the visible innovations in the information sector are leading to productivity advances that are going undetected in the current productivity statistics. On the one hand, the aggregate data suggests a serious productivity slowdown over the past decade. On the other hand, Google’s chief economist, Hal Varian, insists that “there is a lack of appreciation for what’s happening in Silicon Valley, because we don’t have a good way to measure it.”

Surely, there are sectors, such as higher education, in which technological innovations can yield significant productivity gains, right? All that talk about MOOCs and flipped classrooms and the like will make a difference in productivity, yes?

As an optimist, I’ve long resisted Gordon’s argument — but this is one area where I’m beginning to suspect that he’s right and Silicon Valley is wrong.

Via Miloš Bajčetić
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
Data is raw information that has to be interpreted and judged as to what it means. The risk we run with digital technologies, including the Internet, is that we present data as meaningful without thoughtful consideration. It is why teachers remain vital to the educational enterprise.
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Technological, Pedagogical and Content Knowledge

Technological, Pedagogical and Content Knowledge | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
“ Technological, Pedagogical and Content Knowledge model - ideas, framework and practical applications.”
Via Kirschty Birt, Shane Symonds
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
Pedagogy leads the way. It is relational and about leading rather than putting the tools in front with content. Without pedagogy, do teaching and learning happen?
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Monotasking Gets a Makeover

Monotasking Gets a Makeover | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
Monotasking, or single-tasking, is a 21st-century term for what your high school English teacher probably called “paying attention.”

Via Pavel Barta
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
Being on task, one task at a time, is challening.
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Former Teacher Confessed 7 Ways Schools Are Creating ‘Empty’ Children

Former Teacher Confessed 7 Ways Schools Are Creating ‘Empty’ Children | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
You just can't disagree with #5!
Via Ines Bieler, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
This is a powerful indictment of schools. What do we want for our children and grandchildren?
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Should Smartphones Be Banned From Classrooms?

Should Smartphones Be Banned From Classrooms? | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
From middle schools to colleges, cellphones’ adverse effects on student achievement may outweigh their potential as a learning tool.
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
What do students learn if we ban a tool? What we can do, as teachers and adults, is to help them learn how to use them and become responsible in that usage. This only happens when we model responsible uses and help form effective boundaries.
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The Problem With Filtering Kids' Internet Access at School

The Problem With Filtering Kids' Internet Access at School | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
Zealously blocking their access to certain websites can end up undermining learning.
Via Yashy Tohsaku, Dean J. Fusto
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
How do we help students become responsible in their use of the Internet and other digital tools.
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David W. Deeds's curator insight, April 27, 8:35 PM

Just don't do it!

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Teaching in Our Right Minds: Critical Digital Pedagogy and the Response to the New 

Teaching in Our Right Minds: Critical Digital Pedagogy and the Response to the New  | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
The digital isn’t magic. It isn’t mysterious. There’s no need to make it more than it is. Because in the digital, there’s wonder enough.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
Teaching is still an important aspect of education.
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How is this #EdTech Supposed to Work?

How is this #EdTech Supposed to Work? | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
It is an honor when another educator honestly asks you a question, but let us attempt to uncover what those *easy* #edtech coaching questions might tell us.

Via EDTECH@UTRGV, Jennifer Vineyard
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
Technology is about conversations. We narrow defintions into technical meanings that make meanings rigid. Talk and listen with each other as you implement new tools, otherwise they don't get used wisely.
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Is Your District Future Ready? -- THE Journal

Is Your District Future Ready? -- THE Journal | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
Encouraging school leaders to think deeply about equity, agency and leadership when actualizing or revisioning technology integration plans.

Via Norton Gusky, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
Are we listening to classroom teachers? My experience suggests we are not. Change is just done to them.
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Norton Gusky's curator insight, April 20, 3:15 PM
T.H.E. Journal looks at the National Education Technology Plan as a tool to make school systems future ready.
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Why Technology Will Never Fix Education

Why Technology Will Never Fix Education | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it

The real obstacle is student motivation, and no gadget can create that.


Via Nik Peachey, Arun Pradeep
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
Humans, whether administrators, teachers, or parents, remain the key to improving school.
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Ajo Monzó's curator insight, July 27, 2015 4:14 AM

Article molt interessant i recomenable, ajuden les tecnologies de l'aprenentatge a disminuir les diferencies socials?

Dorothy Retha Cook's curator insight, August 23, 2015 9:01 AM

motivated in school not denied out and just simply not being allowed in!  yes the real obstacles dealt with not those that create more but look indifferentiated as better. I do recall a young man stating he had went to get some fast food while in the place the line went no where and he was thinking what was going on with that. It was funny to find that when it got to his turn the electronic cash register was broken and the cashier could not do the math of the purchases without it right. She had been through high school and all that but was allowed to use calculators instead of doing the math for herself, the new technology way but this young lady using her own abilities to count had a problem adding up dollar items and adding the proper taxes on then subtracting the amount of money she was given for the purchase and then giving back the right amount of  change. There was those that she was giving back more change than was given to pay and of coarse they said nothing but those she gave back less than she should have would yell and ask her how in the he-- she got the job she can count what 1plus1 is and all such. The thing he noticed when it got to be his turn the young lady didn't care anymore and just gave him what ever back but he corrected her told her it was ok and showed her a simple way to add and subtract and that was when she said she had been in school all that time and her calculator was how she learned bykeying the info in and when the cash register broke and she was on her own she just didn't know what to do but she thanked him for caring! enough to not ridicule but show her a way out because she already knew she didn't know how to  count but she didn't know what to do about It but he did. education is a great thing but what are the children learning because there may come a day when technology is not working "ipad" all such then how will the answers be obtained will they be able to maintain a life without technology.

Laura Alejandra Rodríguez Vanegas's curator insight, May 2, 9:43 PM
Technology is  just a resource, a tool for  teaching and learning. Technology is not the encharged of doing the teacher´s job.Teachers and learners should know how  to manage technology in order to see results in learning trought it . I agree with the text writer when he says that  technology craate social disparities.It is not only about innovation in learning trough technology. If  the technology is not available for all kinds of students progress in education will not increase.
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The future matters in education, but not in the way that you think

The future matters in education, but not in the way that you think | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
We are currently in a state of denial which could lead to economies such as the U.S., U.K. and Australia being overtaken in the coming decades. It is a strange state, historically, and it betrays the near complete dominance of progressive educational thought in a particular aspect of education. We have returned to 1918, when John…

Via Kim Flintoff
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
Bobbitt is not who I would use to support this idea. Dewey, Whitehead, and Prigogine lay the groundwork extremely well, but their work is not easy to apply. We continuously need to learn from the past and decide what that means in the moment without bringing absolute certainty to the future.
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From the written to digital: New Literacy


Via Alfredo Calderón
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
Students do need to learn how to use the tools at their disposal. That does require teachers who are able to guide them. With rapid changes, this is a challenge and raises questions. Do teachers have time to prepare well? What supports are in place for teachers to learn?
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Social Learning does NOT mean Social Media

Social Learning does NOT mean Social Media | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it

"Even though both social learning and social media witness a lot of human interaction, social media plays a very small role in social learning in the workplace. Instructional designers need, besides real face-to-face collaboration during the learning process, a digital watercooler around which employees gather, have high quality conversations and discuss about possible solutions to business problems."


Via EDTECH@UTRGV, Miloš Bajčetić
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
The 70 and 20% seem to point at communities of practice as being important for adults as they learn. Social media plays a small role. As well, even amongst adults, personal motivation is important. In that case, social media is likely only effective if the person is motivated to learn, has time to access the learning, and is capable of using the media being used. This is important for teachers who are often isolated from others, often working on their own, and little access to social media during the course of their daily work.
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DTLLS tutor's curator insight, April 17, 8:07 AM
I
I'm sure we knew this already ;-)
 
GwynethJones's curator insight, April 17, 7:06 PM

SWEET! Don't HATE the Hashtag!

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Why Pedagogy First, Tech Second Stance is Key to the Future

Why Pedagogy First, Tech Second Stance is Key to the Future | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
As districts across the country purchase technology at a feverish pace, they must ensure they have a solid implementation plan.
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
Teaching is about teaching someone something which makes it relational and pedagogical. Teachers who focus on tools first and people second are not teaching.
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leading and learning: Creative teacher readings - to code or not to code/ PISA /Teaching in flexible spaces/ Sir Ken Robinson and lots more

leading and learning: Creative teacher readings - to code or not to code/ PISA /Teaching in flexible spaces/ Sir Ken Robinson and lots more | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
There are some articles about edtech which are worth exploring. The key question is "How do we use digital technology in classrooms and in learning?" One articles questions whether digital tools get in the way of learning. The key is treating technology like a conversation rather than a given way of doing things.
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Education Readings April 29th

Education Readings April 29th | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
By Allan Alach I welcome suggested articles, so if you come across a gem, email it to me at allanalach@inspire.net.nz Not Every Kid Wants to Learn How to Code The latest educational bandwagon is that all children should be taught how to code computers, although exactly what this is supposed to achieve isn’t clearly spelled out.…
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
There are several articles about the use of digital technology in schools. The word technology is etymologically connected to skilled craftspeople having conversations with and through their tools.
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The hardest task for parents revealed

The hardest task for parents revealed | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
Convincing children to turn off the TV or computer is more difficult than getting them to do their homework, go to bed or take a bath, a poll suggests. Almost one in four mothers and fathers (23.1%) have trouble controlling the amount of time their son or daughter spends watching television or playing on computers, tablets and phones, according to the Action for Children survey.

Via craig daniels
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
Teachers and parents provide powerful role models. We have opportunities to guide children in positive ways. If we take time and unplug and create boundaries for us and children, perhaps they can learn alongside us.
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Too Much Tech Harms Reading Retention in Young Children

Too Much Tech Harms Reading Retention in Young Children | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
For today's children, technological devices such as iPads, smartphones, and e-readers are quickly replacing more traditional "toys" as sources of learning and entertainment. With their capacity to contain a multitude of activities within
Via J. Mark Schwanz
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
Being born in a digital world suggests pedagogues (parents and teachers) work to help children find their way to learn responsible uses of digital tools.
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J. Mark Schwanz's curator insight, April 27, 10:57 AM
I agree that the real focus should be on creative exposure to screens time to allow for more traditional authentic play for early childhood. "Play time, especially in a child’s developmental years, is where the child begins to learn how to interact with others as well as retain information"
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Why pedagogy first, Tech second stance is key to the future

Why pedagogy first, Tech second stance is key to the future | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
While I am a huge advocate for the purposeful integration of technology in schools, we must resist the temptation to think that this is the solution to solve all the ills in our current education system.

What concerns me most is how many districts and schools are going all in with one-on-one or bring-your-own-device (BYOD) initiatives with no real plan for implementation and evaluation of effectiveness. This lack of planning and support will likely result in devices never achieving the outcomes that they were designed to achieve. It’s foolish to think that students will learn just by putting a device in their hands.

What’s needed is a shared vision and strategic plan for how mobile technology will be utilized to improve student learning outcomes that are aligned to higher standards.

When implementing and successfully sustaining a mobile learning initiative, it is imperative not to allow the device to drive instruction. Lessons, curriculum, schools and districts should never be built around technology. Everything we do in education should be built around learning. Thus, if the ultimate goal is to improve student outcomes then the role of any mobile device initiative should be to support or enhance learning.

Via Edumorfosis, juandoming, Suvi Salo
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
Pedagogy involves leading and relationships which makes it important to be first.
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Edumorfosis's curator insight, April 26, 10:42 AM

Yo creo que ambas deben ir de la mano en el proceso de aprendizaje. La pedagogía y la tecnología deben ir juntas, porque de nada sirve tanto esfuerzo si no se generan aprendizajes significativos. Estamos en una era en la que los docentes tenemos que adaptarnos a los estilos de aprendizaje de los estudiantes. El tiempo en que los estudiantes tenían que adaptarse a los estilos se enseñanza de los docentes ha CADUCADO. Esto hace mucho más díficil el proceso de educación.

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Visualizing 21st-Century Classroom Design

Visualizing 21st-Century Classroom Design | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
These five steps are essential in creating a 21st-century classroom: establishing zones, ensuring resource accessibility, encouraging mobility, igniting inspiration, and fostering respect.
Via David W. Deeds
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
In a recent conversation with a teacher, they told me that their administration wanted to have all tables in classrooms. They objected to this as special needs students need to learn how to share space and ask to share space. The idea of zones was one suggestion she made as then it gave her and students opportunities to explore how to share space.
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David W. Deeds's curator insight, April 18, 9:25 PM

Geeky-cool stuff!

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The Ideology of the Blockchain (for Education)

The Ideology of the Blockchain (for Education) | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
All digital technology is ideological. All education technology is ideological.

I repeat this (and quite often, it seems) because technology – and ed-tech in particular – is too frequently discussed as though it is ideology-free. It purports to be at once (and, yet, incongruously) both neutral and necessary. It presents itself at once as value-free (and, yet, incongruously) progressive. That is to say, if technology contains any ideological underpinning at all, we’re supposed to believe, it’s that its forward march is quite inevitable; but that’s okay as it is forward movement – technology serves to make the world better.

This sort of end-of-history, post-ideology ideology that permeates digital technologies (conveniently) frames challenges and criticisms and questions as “ideological” in which “ideological” here means politically-loaded, polemical, biased, bad.

That’s not what I mean when I write that digital technology is ideological or that education technology is ideological. I don’t mean simply that these are interwoven with a certain politics or that they represent developments that I find personally disagreeable. Rather, “ideology” as I use the word refers to the ideas, values, and practices – discourse and power – grounded in the forces of production (e.g. global capitalism) and in the institutions that re-inscribe these. “Ideology” is one way we can think about social struggles, especially as various groups try to legitimate their own interests and do so in such a way that their ideas, values, and practices are seen as natural.

Technologies, particularly the new computer and communications technologies of the twentieth century onward, help reinforce dominant ideology in powerful ways, but these technologies also have their own ideological underpinnings as well, ones that serve in turn to justify and reinforce the cultural and economic changes that society is currently undergoing. Think “Sharing Economy,” for example. This is also, in part at least, what Neil Postman famously described over twenty years ago as the growing pervasiveness of “Technopoly”:

Technopoly eliminates alternatives to itself in precisely the way Aldous Huxley outlined in Brave New World. It does not make them illegal. It does not make them immoral. It does not even make them unpopular. It makes them invisible and therefore irrelevant. And it does so by redefining what we mean by religion, by art, by family, by politics, by history, by truth, by privacy, by intelligence, so that our definitions fit its new requirements. Technopoly, in other words, is totalitarian technocracy.

Via Miloš Bajčetić
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
This is a series of articles that deal with the use of digital technologies in schools. What does it mean? The articles draw on new (Neil Selwyn) thinkers and some that were writing at the early stages of the digital revoluation (Neil Postman). However, you can go back further and read concerns expressed by Heidegger, Arendt, Gadamer, Derrida, etc. and more recently: Turkle and others.

Technology is a conversation between a craftsperson and their tools.
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leading and learning: What are Innovative Learning Environments (ILEs) or Modern Learning Environments (MLEs) really about?

leading and learning: What are Innovative Learning Environments (ILEs) or Modern Learning Environments (MLEs) really about? | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
The paragraph that stood out was the one about old wine in an old bottle as it relates to using new digital tools in classrooms. Are we transforming schools, learning, and teaching? Or, are we just shuffling deck chairs and other furniture around?
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The tide is turning on tech

The tide is turning on tech | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
Once upon a time, there were very large machines, called mainframes, housed in specialised operation centres and dedicated to processing large volumes of transactions that made the world go round. At
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
It is turning, but it might be that it has to turn. Leaders are people who stand in-between the incoming data and mediate it for others. Leading is better understood as procedural and situational. Who is best equipped at a given time to meditate the incoming?

What does that mean in schools? What does it mean for teaching/learning?
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Attention Students: Put Your Laptops Away

Attention Students: Put Your Laptops Away | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it

As laptops become smaller and more ubiquitous, and with the advent of tablets, the idea of taking notes by hand just seems old-fashioned to many students today. Typing your notes is faster — which comes in handy when there's a lot of information to take down. But it turns out there are still advantages to doing things the old-fashioned way.

For one thing, research shows that laptops and tablets have a tendency to be distracting — it's so easy to click over to Facebook in that dull lecture. And a study has shown that the fact that you have to be slower when you take notes by hand is what makes it more useful in the long run.

In the study published in Psychological Science, Pam A. Mueller of Princeton University and Daniel M. Oppenheimer of the University of California, Los Angeles sought to test how notetaking by hand or by computer affects learning.

"When people type their notes they have this tendency to try to take verbatim notes and write down as much of the lecture as they can," Mueller tells NPR's Rachel Martin. "The students who were taking longhand notes in our studies were forced to be more selective — because you can't write as fast as you can type. And that extra processing of the material that they were doing benefited them."

Mueller and Oppenheimer cited that notetaking can be categorized two ways: generative and nongenerative. Generative notetaking pertains to "summarizing, paraphrasing, concept mapping," while nongenerative notetaking involves copying something verbatim.

And there are two hypotheses to why notetaking is beneficial in the first place. The first idea is called the encoding hypothesis, which says that when a person is taking notes, "the processing that occurs" will improve "learning and retention." The second, called the external-storage hypothesis, is that you learn by being able to look back at your notes, or even the notes of other people.

Because people can type faster than they write, using a laptop will make people more likely to try to transcribe everything they're hearing. So on the one hand, Mueller and Oppenheimer were faced with the question of whether the benefits of being able to look at your more complete, transcribed notes on a laptop outweighs the drawbacks of not processing that information. On the other hand, when writing longhand, you process the information better but have less to look back at.

For their first study, they took university students (the standard guinea pig of psychology) and showed them TED talks about various topics. Afterward, they found that the students who used laptops wrote significantly more words than those who took notes by hand. When testing how well the students remembered information, the researchers found a key point of divergence in the type of question. For questions that asked students to simply remember facts, like dates, both groups did equally well. But for "conceptual-application" questions, such as, "How do Japan and Sweden differ in their approaches to equality within their societies?" the laptop users did "significantly worse."

The same thing happened in the second study, even when they specifically told students using laptops to try to avoid writing things down verbatim. "Even when we told people they shouldn't be taking these verbatim notes, they were not able to overcome that instinct," Mueller says. The more words the students copied verbatim, the worse they performed on recall tests.


Via Miloš Bajčetić
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
Writing and keyboarding use the brain differently which may help explain the retention aspect. This is one of those digitial literacy areas that teachers have the ability to help students with. The key will be support from the school managers and consultants who fancy themselves expert in everything classroom, althought they are not there. It will require retaining cursive writing, which some have argued to get rid of teaching this skill.
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Reflections of a Digitally Literate Wannabe: Are Learners disengaged with technology in the classroom??

Reflections of a Digitally Literate Wannabe: Are Learners disengaged with technology in the classroom?? | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
I think that there are a number of mitigating factors with this disengagement that involves teachers and students.
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