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10 Great Resources on 21st Century Education ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

10 Great Resources on 21st Century Education ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I am always wary when someone uses superlatives and makes lists. It is like 7 Habits that will make me more effective. I wish life were so simple. Having said this, there might be enough in this to make some of it worthwhile.

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My top 5 on why learning - Mark Anderson's Blog

My top 5 on why learning - Mark Anderson's Blog | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
education, learning & technology

Via Mikko Hakala
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

We need to show our major stakeholders we can improve learning. That is interesting, but I do not see that eduction consists of major stakeholders. The people we need to focus on our students.

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Mikko Hakala's curator insight, April 22, 1:46 PM

It is learning that is at the heart of teaching. Here are 5 great reflections on learning from Mark Anderson, @ICTEvangelist - from being a role model to personal development.

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The One Room Schoolhouse Goes High Tech

The One Room Schoolhouse Goes High Tech | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
A new school in San Francisco is combining the Silicon Valley startup model with progressive education tactics, creating classrooms as individual entities, using sensoring technologies to track kids' progress, and building tech tools based on teacher requests.

By Katrina Schwartz 


Via Lou Salza
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

We need many new models.

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Lou Salza's curator insight, April 22, 6:10 PM

I was interested to learn about this heuristic. We need more of this kind of exploration in the education industry. I was especially taken with how important student interest was to the design of the curriculum.--Lou

 

Excerpt:

....And in the true spirit of a startup, the school’s ethos is to “fail fast” and pivot — change direction — when necessary.

“We take as one of our primary objectives the constant innovation of the platform and what’s happening in the classroom,” Ventilla said. “If it’s taking us a year to change things that needs to be changed, we’ve failed.”

FOCUS ON INDIVIDUALIZATION

While the school is using Common Core as a guideline for its teaching standards, students aren’t grouped by grade level. Rather, students move through activities based on their skill and are broadly grouped in age ranges that include transitional kindergarten, “youngers,” “olders,” and middle school.

“We don’t think there’s such a thing as a grade,” Ventilla said. “Kids are at different levels across their academic and non-academic trajectories and it’s about creating an environment of peers, people that push them, people that are good influences, but also people that they can be friends with and have intellectual peers....."

 
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The Secret Cost of a Surveillance Society

The Secret Cost of a Surveillance Society | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
Fear of the criminal justice system can lead to negative health, financial, and educational outcomes.

Via Trudy Raymakers
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

This surveillance is pervasive in our society including our school. Rather than learning to be responsible, being constantly under surveillance means we learn to accountable and find ways to avoid being kept track of.

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Conversation with Alan Levine, Pedagogical Technologist | DMLcentral

Conversation with Alan Levine, Pedagogical Technologist | DMLcentral | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
“Instructional technologist” is an inadequate description for what Alan Levine has done at Maricopa Community Colleges, the New Media Consortium and the University of Mary Washington, often from his connected cabin in the Arizona highlands.

Via Alfredo Calderon
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

DIY learning is not learning. Learning is a social process. Tech is the tool that gets us there. Technology is the study of those tools suggesting thoughtfulness and relations.

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Creative Visualizations of Bloom's Taxonomies!

This is an organic SlideShare presentation discovering the juiciest visualizations of Bloom's taxonomies (old and revised). Blog post: http://zaidlearn.blogspot.com/2014/03/creative-visualizations-of-blooms.html

Via Anne Whaits, ernestprats, Sharrock
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

There are quite a few different visuals to consider.

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scil's curator insight, March 23, 6:04 AM

Umfangreiche Sammlung von Visualisierungen zur Bloom Taxonomiea(Fassung von 1956 und 20.02)

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Welcome to Educating Modern Learners

Welcome to Educating Modern Learners | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it

In the time it takes to read this, about 7,500 people from around the world will gain regular access to the Internet for the first time. Twelve in the next second. One point one million in the next 24 hours.

 

By the end of this decade, 5 billion people around the globe will have access. Access to what is already close to becoming the sum of human knowledge. Access to millions of tools and apps that now run from ‘the cloud’ or on the devices we carry in our backpacks and our pockets.

 

And, most importantly, access to one another.


Via iEARN-USA, Bobby Dillard
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Access does give everyone freedom to learn. The question is what are they learning? Learning, schooling, and education are not interchangeable words. They each carry different meanings. We can learn at any time. Schooling is something that is mandated and it does not follow that learning per planned curricula happens. Education is a continuing the transmission of a healthy society.

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10 Iconic Teacher Actions That Technology Should Disrupt

10 Iconic Teacher Actions That Technology Should Disrupt | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
10 Iconic Teacher Actions That Technology Should Disrupt by Terry Heick A little bit of technology doesn’t change much. Can make things a little easier by automating them. It could make a lesson here or...

Via Yashy Tohsaku
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

There are probably others, but this is a good start. I got rid of the iconic desk and had a corner for my computer. It faced into the classroom and rarely sat there during class.

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Learning with 'e's: The sharp end -The Pencil Metaphor Steve Wheeler

Learning with 'e's: The sharp end -The Pencil Metaphor Steve Wheeler | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it

"Progress does not respect barriers. It bulldozes its way through them, drives roughshod over all objections and ultimately achieves its goal."  Steve Wheeler

 

From the blog post:

 

I stumbled upon this graphic earlier in the week. It comes courtesy of the Positive DV8R blog, and I wanted to share it with you. It's another simple and humorous, and yet all too painfully true pencil metaphor. Our old friend the pencil points us to definitions of six types of people you can find in any given organisation, and their various responses to innovation. The graphic is adapted from a short piece by Lindy McKeown who elaborates better than I could and is certainly worth a quick read. I wonder if you are able to identify the different responses with people you work with?


Via k3hamilton, Rogério Queirós, michel verstrepen, Jim Lerman, steve batchelder, Suvi Salo
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Progress does respect barriers. We can choose how we are in relationship with the technology, innovations, and progress we encounter. Too often, progress controls us and it is not progress.

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When parents are the ones too distracted by devices

When parents are the ones too distracted by devices | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it

Having a teenager lost in his or her cellphone — texting friends and communicating with parents in monosyllabic grunts — has become a trope of the Internet age. But teens are not the only ones distracted by their devices.

Many parents have the same problem. As much as I hate to admit it, I'm one of them.

A couple weeks ago, my 12-year-daughter, Ella, staged an intervention. She and my wife basically threatened to take my phone and break it.

"Sometimes at night you'll just stand around and ... you'll have your phone out and you'll just type and you'll just stand there," Ella says.

Ella can be a brutal mimic. And as she describes my distraction, she strikes up my smartphone pose: the phone balanced against my belly — thumbs madly typing away — (as if by holding the phone that way no one will notice that I'm on it).

"Lila's ready to go to bed, everybody's trying to get people to read to them and you're just standing there in the middle of the hallway reading your texts and texting other people," she adds.

Hearing from my oldest that I'm ignoring her little sister stings.

"Has that gotten worse?" I ask.

"It hasn't really changed; it got worse when we moved to California," Ella says.

That was when I started covering technology.

"Do you feel jealous of my cellphone? Do you get mad at it?" I ask.

That earns an eye roll and a laugh.

"No, why would I get jealous of a cellphone?"

"I don't know," I say. "Do you feel like you are competing for attention?"

"Yeah."

With that she wins the argument.

And Ella isn't the only kid who feels this way about her parent's relationship with devices.

, a clinical and consulting psychologist at Harvard, recently wrote . For her book, Steiner-Adair interviewed more than 1,000 kids from the ages of 4 to 18. She talked to hundreds of teachers and parents.

"One of the many things that absolutely knocked my socks off," she says, "was the consistency with which children — whether they were 4 or 8 or 18 or 24 — talked about feeling exhausted and frustrated and sad or mad trying to get their parents' attention, competing with computer screens or iPhone screens or any kind of technology, much like in therapy you hear kids talk about sibling rivalry."

Steiner-Adair says one of the challenges we all face is that these devices are wired to grab our attention and keep it. She says the most successful apps are popular, even addictive, because they in our brains.

"Yes, when you are plugged into your screen the part of your brain that lights up is the to-do list," Steiner-Adair says. "Everything feels urgent — everything feels a little exciting. We get a little dopamine hit when we accomplish another email — check this, check that. And when a child is waiting by or comes into your room and it's one of those mini-moments and you don't know — that's the hard thing about parenting — you don't know if this is the ordinary question or they're coming with something really important. It's very hard as a grown-up to disengage and give them your attention with the [same] warmth that you give them, the same tone of voice that you greet them if they interrupt you when you're scrambling eggs."

A couple of years ago, my daughter got a laptop for school. And because she was becoming more independent, we got her a phone. We set up rules for when she could use this stuff and when she'd need to put it away. We created a charging station, outside her bedroom, where she had to plug in these devices every night. Basically — except for homework — she has to put it all away when she comes home.

Steiner-Adair says most adults don't set up similar limits in their own lives.

"We've lost the boundaries that protect work and family life," she says. "So it is very hard to manage yourself and be as present to your children in the moments they need you."

Steiner-Adair says that whether you are a parent or not, carving out time to turn off your devices — to disconnect from the wired world and engage with the real people who are all around you — is one of the best gifts you can give yourself and the people your love.

After my daughter's little intervention, I made myself a promise to create my own charging station. To plug my phone in — somewhere far away — when I am done working for the day. I've been trying to leave it there untouched for most of the weekend.

And while I still find myself reaching for it — or checking my pocket — leaving my phone behind is also kind of freeing. Last weekend, instead of checking Twitter and reading tech blogs I built a treehouse.


Via Vilma Bonilla
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Adults face tech challenges. I know school managers who cannot greet someone properly due to their inability to look away from their PDA. Is that example we want for children?

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Vilma Bonilla's curator insight, April 17, 1:03 PM

The importance of disengagement and setting up boundaries. - "Parents often complain that smartphones keep their kids distracted from conversation. What happens when it's the other way around, when kids can't get their smartphone-glued parents' attention?"

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Does Our Current Education System Support Innovation?

Does Our Current Education System Support Innovation? | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
Flickr:Flickingerbrad By Aran Levasseur Innovation is the currency of progress. In our world of seismic changes, innovation has become a holy grail that

Via Jenn Alevy
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I would say no. A point made in the article is we are using 20th Century curricula in the 21st Century. Most of what is being taught is dictated from outside classrooms and that is old-school.  If we thought of classrooms as on the margins and had strong teachers allowed to be creative, that would be innovative.

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Why You Should Unplug -Infographic

Why You Should Unplug -Infographic | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
We are connected most of the time these days. I consider myself extremely connected, and even I find myself at times overwhelmed by how connected people are. We’ve often gone out to dinner with friends to find at least one of them totally ignoring the conversation because they are completely engrossed in checking the news/Facebook/Instagram/the …

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

We each need breaks. I try taking every Sunday off and a little break each day. I get to decide when I need to use tech and when I do not. I rarely take my laptop to classes.

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Tomas Trejbal's curator insight, April 17, 1:19 PM

enjoy some offline days and free your mind...

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The Definition Of Combination Learning

The Definition Of Combination Learning | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
The Definition Of Combination Learning

Via Maria Lopez Alvarado, MBA, The Rice Process
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

It is interesting.

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A Tidal Wave of Data -Impacts of the Digital Ocean on Education

A Tidal Wave of Data -Impacts of the Digital Ocean on Education | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Certainly, digital technologies do provide some immediate feedback, but do they provide reassuring and comforting words and actions?

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Ana Cristina Pratas's curator insight, April 15, 9:57 AM

"Kristen DiCerbo and John Behrens argue that this transformation from ‘digital desert to digital ocean’ has the potential to help decipher how students learn and to help them succeed. According to a study by John Hattie in which he analysed 800 studies about factors that influenced students’ achievement, the most important factor was when teachers use information about their students’ learning. The report sets out the ways in which the variety and abundance of data captured when students carry out their school work could provide teachers with the key to help students learn. "

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The Myth Of Digital Citizenship And Why We Need To Teach It Anyway

The Myth Of Digital Citizenship And Why We Need To Teach It Anyway | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
At one time in the not so distant past there were no cell phones. And then everything changed at a rate faster than the speed of amending a student handbook. I can distinctly remember the first time one of my 8th grade students brought a cell phone to school. It really wasn’t that big of a deal, more of a novelty really. I mean one student with a cell phone had next to no bearing on our day to day school operations. But then a second student brought a cell phone.

Via Fishtree Education
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

This is a very interesting perspective. Texting is similar to passing notes. The idea we have rules in place makes sense. Questions should be asked. One that comes to mind is the texting disrupting learning?

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Are Existing Tech Tools Effective for Teachers and Students?

Are Existing Tech Tools Effective for Teachers and Students? | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
The Gates Foundation released a report today surveying teachers and students on the kinds of digital tools they'd like to see available in classrooms.

Via Bonnie Bracey Sutton, Suvi Salo
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

"The report paints a picture of a fragmented system where teachers are constantly searching for tools to help them meet new standards and requirements, but are distanced from decision making about the tools they use in the classroom." This says most of what needs to be said. Teachers, not external experts and non-teachers, need greater say in decisions. The idea of external experts is an oxymoron. How can you be an expert outside the classroom context.

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Confronting the Myth of the 'Digital Native'

Confronting the Myth of the 'Digital Native' | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it

Professors at Northwestern University are training students to build online identities that can advance their academic and professional careers.


Via ICTPHMS
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The point that caught my eye was about the stratification of digital usage. Only a few privileged young people use the Internet successfully and many more lack the basic skills to navigate the Internet. This stands in sharp contrast to an article I read recently debunking the myths of technology such as digital natives. That article lacked any science. It was just someone who is not in a classroom and only passed through briefly.

The findings paint a picture not of an army of app-building, HTML-typing twenty-somethings, but of a stratified landscape in which some, mostly privileged, young people use their skills constructively, while others lack even basic Internet knowledge. - See more at: http://m.chronicle.com/article/Confronting-the-Myth-of-the/145949/?cid=at#sthash.n0Vyt0l4.dpufThe findings paint a picture not of an army of app-building, HTML-typing twenty-somethings, but of a stratified landscape in which some, mostly privileged, young people use their skills constructively, while others lack even basic Internet knowledge. - See more at: http://m.chronicle.com/article/Confronting-the-Myth-of-the/145949/?cid=at#sthash.n0Vyt0l4.dpuf
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Ignore age—define generations by the tech they use

Ignore age—define generations by the tech they use | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
When kids are shown 1980s technology, they're dumbfounded. Today's generations will be divided by technology as it evolves, and they should be. (Nice piece, @mckinneykelsey!

Via Chris Carter
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

This is a good point. Even Marc Prensky has rethought the concepts digital natives and digital immigrants. In a way, we are all digital immigrants as the pace of change is so dynamic.

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Chris Carter's curator insight, April 21, 5:02 PM

Brilliant, and funny!

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What Should We Focus On Learning In An Age Where Almost All Information Is At Your Fingertips?

What Should We Focus On Learning In An Age Where Almost All Information Is At Your Fingertips? | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it

What should we focus on learning in an age where almost all information is at your fingertips? This question was originally answered on Quora by Robert Frost and Balaji Viswanathan.


Via Jenny Ebermann, Bobby Dillard
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

There are good points made. It is important to be able to apply the information and knowledge wisely. That is what we get as we move up the taxonomy.

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The Right & Wrong Way To Use Technology For Learning

The Right & Wrong Way To Use Technology For Learning | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
The Right & Wrong Way To Use Technology For Learning (Technology is means of teaching, it's not the education itself.

Via Deborah Banker
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Technology is tool and teachers have to be aware of the relationships they have with it in the classroom. Technology includes digital i.e. BYOD and discursive i.e. curricula.

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Deborah Banker's curator insight, April 18, 2:59 PM

Absolutely love this chart!

Lisa Norris's curator insight, April 20, 6:41 PM

We do sometimes get caught up in it and forget....

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Cleaning Up Your Digital Identity: A Student's Perspective

Cleaning Up Your Digital Identity: A Student's Perspective | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
As Students, we always hear parents, teachers and other adults lecturing us about what we post online. Or, more importantly what we shouldn’t be posting online. We tend to take what they say with a...

Via ICTPHMS
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

This contains some straightforward information that can be applied by anyone.

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Technology Isn’t The Only Answer to Digital Disruption

Technology Isn’t The Only Answer to Digital Disruption | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it

What’s the difference between disruptive tech and that of emergent or innovative technology?

 

...Instead of reacting to technology trends at departmental levels, some progressive, brave and tireless strategists (aka change agents) are investing in a more comprehensive campaign of digital transformation.

 

The goal is to invest in informed models that help businesses recognize opportunities, overcome challenges, and make decisions to stay in step, if not ahead of digital customers. Digital transformation is in fact, the next big thing in customer experience and ultimately how business is done....


Via Jeff Domansky, Tessie Uranga-MSEd.
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

When we stop chasing trends. This is what we are doing in school-education. It is important to be thoughtful and have people who spent considerable time in classrooms involved. What works is revealed in what happens in classrooms not as a front office decision.

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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, April 17, 6:46 AM

It's the human factor! Research by Brian Solis on the impact of disruption and adaptation of new technology is essential reading for marketing, PR and Digital strategists. 10/10

aanve's curator insight, April 17, 8:59 PM

www.aanve.com

 

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SAMR success is NOT about Tech

SAMR success is NOT about Tech | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
Quick refresh If you aren't aware of the S.A.M.R. model (devised by Ruben R. Puentedura - @rubenrp) then in simple form it explains the common journey teachers go through when introducing technolog...

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Teaching is often equated to stand and deliver lecturing. That is the easy part. I found teaching was the one-on-one conversations and small group conversations where students challenged me with questions and I responded in kind.  Teaching done as conversation is always the key to learning when it happens and it is most unpredictable.

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Technology in Education is Classist

Technology in Education is Classist | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it

“ A debate between Private School technology and Public School technology is actually a debate between Rich kids technology and Poor kids technology. Is it not? Rich isn't just about money, its also about the luxury of time and the human capacity to prioritize where to invest money and time to get the greatest return for…”


Via David W. Deeds, Emerson Mistico, ThePinkSalmon
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I disagree that education is slightly classist. it is a lot classist. It is about replicating society and its existing status quo. Actually, it is not education that is classist, but school which is the institution an elite uses to keep an existing class system in tact. All this makes technology in schools exceptionally classist which goes a long way to explaining the people who trumpet technology as necessary in schools.

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The Right Model for Live Online Classes | Inside Higher Ed

The Right Model for Live Online Classes | Inside Higher Ed | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it

Via Blaine Morrow
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I scooped it because I just wanted to say that there is no one right model. It is all situational. To think there is one right model is outdated, industrial model, and modernist thinking.

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Cloud schooling: why we still need teachers in the internet age

Cloud schooling: why we still need teachers in the internet age | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
Education guru Sugata Mitra and his colleagues — who have pioneered the “School in the Cloud” — are sending ripples through the world of education. Their idea is simple: provide learning spaces with ready…

Via Elaine Roberts, Ph.D
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Teachers are essential in education, including in the cloud. Teaching does not guarantee learning and, for that reason, our understanding of what teaching is and the role of teachers should be continuously changing. This is not a product of the current modernist discourse that argues the change will come from outside the teaching. Instead, it is embedded in a new discourse which argues the real change can only happen from within teaching.

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Elaine Roberts, Ph.D's curator insight, April 16, 5:54 AM

Today I learned about the Granny Cloud. Read the article and you'll learn about it, too.


Teachers are still important for a lot of reasons. Many of which many educators seem to have forgotten.