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Digital Leaders – Why you need them in your school? (Plus a few tips on how to get started)

Digital Leaders – Why you need them in your school? (Plus a few tips on how to get started) | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
Students are curious. Without this curiosity, I don’t believe a Digital Leader programme would be so successful. Show them something they are interested in and they want to know more. If they...
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I agree we need digital technology leaders in our schools and school systems. So far, I see digital technology managers. Most of these people are no longer in classrooms and/or wanted out of the classroom as fast as they could get. Worse yet, classroom teachers are not involved unless they agree with the party line. Having said this, it is important to build a healthy culture from the classroom out around the idea of responsible and mindful digital leadership.

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Educational technology isn't leveling the playing field - Hechinger Report

Educational technology isn't leveling the playing field - Hechinger Report | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
The local name for the Philadelphia neighborhood of Kensington is “the Badlands,” and with good reason. Pockmarked with empty lots and burned-out row houses, the area has an unemployment rate of 29 percent and a poverty rate of 90 percent. Just a few miles to the northwest, the genteel neighborhood of Chestnut Hill seems to …

Via Susan Bainbridge, Bonnie Bracey Sutton
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I think classroom teachers have realized this was the case. Including the people closest to the action into the conversation is essential.

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Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Effective Technology Integration into Education
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What 'Open Learning' Looks Like When It's For Kids Who Need it Most (EdSurge News)

What 'Open Learning' Looks Like When It's For Kids Who Need it Most (EdSurge News) | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
We've heard a lot of talk these days about open educational resources and online courses and how these platforms can make high-quality learning available for all. The code.org campaign has been touting the potential of online courses to teach kids how to code. Khan Academy has been the darling of th

Via Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Digital technologies have to be used carefully with children who have the most needs. The last year I taught I was finally included in a conversation with a psychologist and told him that assisted reading tech did not help a lot of children because they could not keep pace and did not always have the vocabulary. He told me I was the first person who had ever mentioned that. It means we have to have relationships with children before we make broad statements about what works and what does not.

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Wearable Technology: will education look very different in the future? | eLearning Marketplace

Wearable Technology: will education look very different in the future? | eLearning Marketplace | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it

“ Wearable technology certainly seems to be gaining ground with many getting very excited about the variety of devices coming on the market. Whether it's a smart”


Via Chris Carter, Torsten Fell
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The question is not about whether education (School) will look different. It is about School being different for everyone and not just those who can afford the latest gadgets.

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Chris Carter's curator insight, July 4, 12:14 PM

Within 5 years.

Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Internet, Social Media and Online Safety
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Push your kids to interact in real world

Push your kids to interact in real world | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
Andrew O’Grady writes about the importance of face-to-face interactions for children instead of only through social media.

Via Elizabeth Milovidov
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Integrating life in reasonable ways is important. School is a place which too often reinforces the busyness. Finding ways to counter this is essential.

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Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from ICT
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9 Work Habits You Need to Stop Today

Author Tim Ferriss suggests some common bad habits you should definitely add to your not-to-do-list.

Via Suvi Salo
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I began to check my email less the last year I taught. I felt better and more focused on what I was doing. It also annoyed people who sent me the emails. I have never answered calls from unknown numbers. They can leave a message which rarely happens.

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Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Technology and Teaching
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The Science of Attention (And Why eLearning Professionals Should Care)

The Science of Attention (And Why eLearning Professionals Should Care) | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it

"Paying attention is a task people take for granted; they rarely stop to think about the complex neurocognitive processes involved. However, it is an important topic for eLearning developers who are often so concerned about the superficial elements of their courses and neglect to learn how the brain works. After all, paying attention is the first step in the learning process, so ensuring learners pay attention is fundamental."


Via EDTC@UTB, Deborah Banker
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

All teachers, online and offline, should check regularly and determine whether students are attending to what is being learning.

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Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Web 2.0 Education
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Why iPads Haven’t Changed Much In Your Classroom

Why iPads Haven’t Changed Much In Your Classroom | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
TEST Why iPads Haven’t Changed Much In Your Classroom
by Terry Heick
Ed note: This article was updated from a 2012 post on Apple’s textbook initiative.
There was much buzz surrounding Apple’s latest initiative.

Via Yashy Tohsaku
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Do we want technology that replicates itself or do we want reproduction which suggests sharing of non-similar genetic materials? Did we think digital technologies would change anything without deep change to School?

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Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
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3 Key Concepts That Will Help You Understand Learning in the Digital Age

3 Key Concepts That Will Help You Understand Learning in the Digital Age | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
These three "gogies" of effective online learning will help you get a clearer picture of learning and eLearning in the digital age.

 

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Heutagogy

 


Via Beth Dichter, SUSANA APARICIO, Gust MEES
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

These might work well with mature learners, but there is still a role for pedagogy. Another key point is are these really separate concepts or is it more likely they overlap along with pedagogy?

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Gust MEES's curator insight, July 3, 9:17 AM

These three "gogies" of effective online learning will help you get a clearer picture of learning and eLearning in the digital age.


Learn more:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Heutagogy


Joyce Valenza's curator insight, July 4, 6:28 AM

Interesting new takes to consider.

Julie Bourguignon's curator insight, July 9, 2:34 AM

A variety of skills are needed to become a well-rounded individual. This supposes learning approaches tailored to facilitate acquisition of these skills.

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Update for the 21st Century: Declaration of Interdependence

Update for the 21st Century: Declaration of Interdependence | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
As the Fourth of July holiday here in the states rapidly approaches, I want to propose an updated manifesto for this hyper-connected, transparent, and morally-interdependent world we are now in.When,

Via David Hain
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

We do live in a hyper-connected world, but we are not just connected to this world and all its phenomena. We live in responsible and ethical relationships which bind us together.

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David Hain's curator insight, July 1, 8:02 AM

A great 4 July post for the 21st century from @Rob Peters - creating @StandardofTrust with #RelationshipCapital.  Happy Interdependence day!

David Hain's curator insight, July 1, 8:03 AM

Happy 4 July to all my American friends!

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How Tomorrow’s Tech Helps Teachers Today

How Tomorrow’s Tech Helps Teachers Today | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
The SAMR teaching model guides educators to new teaching methods through technology.

Via Grant Montgomery, ICTPHMS
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

SAMR is usable with and without digital technologies. Teaching requires taking time, reflecting on what worked and what did not work so well. The latter is a process of diffraction (Karen Barad) and refraction (Emmanuel Levinas).

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Making Sense of the Rhizome Metaphor for Teaching and Learning

Making Sense of the Rhizome Metaphor for Teaching and Learning | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
This is the second post in a series of four about a presentation Frances Bell and Jenny Mackness will make at the ALTMOOCSIG  on Friday 29th June this week.  One of the reasons for these posts is t...
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I like the point part way down with deleted word. Weeds are necessary in life according to many mystical viewpoints. They provide the mulch and fertilizer when we turn the ground making it healthier. Teaching and learning are holistic and relational processes in this sense.

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Open Access increases citations – yes or no? | Open Science

Open Access increases citations – yes or no? | Open Science | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
The issue of citations is crucial for all researchers and scholars who are interested in publishing their scientific work in the Open Access model. The wide availability of scientific articles and books that is the result of publishing in OA helps scholars to gain a higher level of paper downloads and citations. I have written about this phenomenon of Open Access more than a few times. However it is always worth exploring this subject further with new examples of the influence of Open Access on the level of citations. This time I would like to refer to the report "A longitudinal comparison of citation rates and growth among open access journals" by David J Solomon, Mikael Laakso and Bo-Christer Björk. The researchers analyzed data from multiple sources to explore the outlined research aims which was: “Compare Source-Normalized Impact per Paper Version 2 (SNIP2) Citation Averages for OA journals with that of subscription journals during the period 1999 through 2010” The results of their analysis are very interesting. According to the presented data high quality OA publishing is growing at a rapid pace and helps to gain a higher level of citations, comparable to or higher than subscription journals. As you can see below, in 2010 the Weighted Source Normalized Impact per Paper Version 2 (SNIP2) Citation Rates for Health Science Journals is almost the same for subscription journals and OA journals with APCs. What is interesting, is that OA journals without APCs fall much behind. For Non‐Health Science Journals situation is pretty much the same: Even more interesting, is that the SNIP2 Citation Averages is much higher for OA journals that were established from scratch than for journals that were converted to the OA model. These data show that Open Access may have a positive impact on the level of citations of a specific paper. On the other hand, the report "Does Online Availability Increase Citations? Theory and Evidence from a Panel of Economics and Business Journals" by Mark J. McCabe and Christopher M. Snyder shows data which are not so conclusive. The researchers have analyzed 100 journals in economics and business in the context of JSTOR. Each journal has many volumes and experiences a different pattern of online access. As we can read in this report: "The dataset merges citations data together with historical information on online availability. The citations data was acquired from Thomson ISI. For each of the 100 journals in our sample, ISI lists every article published since 1956. Each published article is linked to all cites from all of the over 8,000 ISI-indexed journals for each year from 1980 to 2005. The database includes detailed information on journal and article title, publication date, author name, affiliation, and location for both the citing article and the cited article. To this basic citation data we merged hand-collected information on online availability of the full-text article." The results are quite intriguing. On the one hand, results confirm to some extent the positive impact of OA on the level of citations. The report states "JSTOR shows significantly positive effects, averaging around a 10% subscription elasticity (meaning that a doubling of JSTOR subscriptions causes a 10% increase in citations)." However the final conclusion is rather negative: "At the same time the modest size of these effects, and the current lack of evidence that free online access performs better, implies that the citation benefits of open access publishing have been exaggerated by its proponents. Even if publishing in an open-access journal were generally associated with a 10% boost in citations, it is not clear that authors in economics and business would be willing to pay several thousand dollars for this benefit, at least in lieu of subsidies" The question whether OA does or does not increase the level of citations is continually raised in the scientific community. There are many analyses and reports that seem to confirm this thesis; however, there is no shortage of results that say just the opposite, that OA has no impact on citations. As is often the case in science, the result of research often depends on the adopted methodology and the subject of study. But in the end, the one person who needs to answer for this question is the researcher itself. Open Access does not always help to gain a higher level of citations for a particular paper, but in general, there is a lot of evidence confirming that the described phenomenon takes place. How researchers will use the opportunities provided by Open Access is a matter of personal choice. | Your guide to Open Access publishing and Open Science

Via Nader Ale Ebrahim, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

It seems somewhat paradoxical that more access would not result in more citations.

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Meditation for the Rest Of Us.

Meditation for the Rest Of Us. | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
Though it’s true that diligent practice can lead even the most scatter-brained Zen-heathen human to mindfulness, some of us prefer to hop on the fast track to s
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Meditation moves us from the cushion and mat to life. We take the mindfulness acquired and it becomes practice it in real life.

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Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Personal [e-]Learning Environments
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The Struggles and Realities of Student-Driven Learning and BYOD

The Struggles and Realities of Student-Driven Learning and BYOD | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
The promise of technology in the classroom has long been equal access to resources on the internet, but a digital divide still exists largely because of the other issues poverty raises in schools.

Via ThePinkSalmon
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

BYOD is a concept that was dreamed up by middle-class teachers and tech people who did not think about the consequences for children, their families, and classroom teachers. Knowing the issues that constrain and enable BYOD is very important.

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Nancy J. Herr's curator insight, July 8, 5:19 PM

Do we really think all children have access to appropriate learning technology? For some students, it is just another reminder of what they don't have. 

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Teachers as Technology Trailblazers: The 2014 Horizon Report Focuses on Pedagogy

Teachers as Technology Trailblazers: The 2014 Horizon Report Focuses on Pedagogy | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it

The Horizon Report, an annual paper that focuses on the emerging trends for technology and schools, is often recognized for the ways it analyzes TOOLS.

.However, this year, it's taken a different approach. The insightful group of educators (including my boss, Rob Mancabelli) guiding the report decided that the two fast trends for teaching and learning with technology are strongly focused onPEDAGOGY. .Specifically, the two fast trends are cited in the report as follows:Rethinking the roles of teachersShift to deeper learning approachesIn short, the changes that are happening this year specifically relate to the way we teach and the way we learn. 


Via Gust MEES
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Creating policies and rethinking teachers' roles is about including teachers in the conversation. Most of what I experienced was download and offloading. This was particularly the case towards the end of my career.

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Gust MEES's curator insight, July 8, 5:13 AM
Specifically, the two fast trends are cited in the report as follows:
  • Rethinking the roles of teachers
  • Shift to deeper learning approaches
In short, the changes that are happening this year specifically relate to the way we teach and the way we learn.
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from digital citizenship
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Tech Ed Resources for your Classroom–Digital Citizenship Curriculum

Tech Ed Resources for your Classroom–Digital Citizenship Curriculum | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
Digital Citizenship–probably one of the most important topics students will learn between kindergarten and 8th and too often, teachers are thrown into it without a roadmap. This book is your guide to what children must know at ...

Via Bonnie Bracey Sutton
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

This resource treats tech teaching as if it is something other than teaching. Teaching is about teaching the whole child and not just a particular part of the child.

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The Biggest Hurdle to Flipping Your Class - jonbergmann.com

The Biggest Hurdle to Flipping Your Class - jonbergmann.com | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
The biggest hurdle to flipping your class is to change your THINKING about the best use of face to face class time.

Via Vladimir Kukharenko, Suvi Salo
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I had to surrender control of student learning to the students. That is the way it should be. Teaching is about being in relationship with students and does not guarantee they will learn. Teaching is about inviting students into their personal learning which is an incredible responsibility.

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Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Teaching and Learning in the 21st Century
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The Digital Lives of Teens: "If You Don't Have a Plan for Them, They Will Have a Plan for You"

The Digital Lives of Teens: "If You Don't Have a Plan for Them, They Will Have a Plan for You" | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
Teachers should make an effort to understand how best to operate in their students' digital world if they hope to make learning engaging and relevant.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Marisol Araya Fonseca
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The tension being experienced between people and digital technologies is there for students as well. The pace of change is such that perhaps even students are unable to keep pace. Using each other's expertise seems particularly relevant which means entering into new relationships between teachers and students where the rules are less rigid.

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Should We Unconnect from Our PLNs Over Summer Break?

Should We Unconnect from Our PLNs Over Summer Break? | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
Do we get away from all things school-related for the summer? Or should we stay connected to personal learning networks and nurture our professional growth?
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Teachers need to take time away from their work. The challenge is not to find balance, but to integrate work and leisure in ways that work well for the teacher. After all, teachers who do not put themselves first cannot put students first. What is interesting is most of the advice to disconnect comes from those outside the classroom. When it is brought up by classroom teachers, what are the reactions by School managers, consultants, politicians, etc?

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Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Ethics in Tech
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Facebook emotion study breached ethical guidelines, researchers say

Facebook emotion study breached ethical guidelines, researchers say | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
Lack of 'informed consent' means that Facebook experiment on nearly 700,000 news feeds broke rules on tests on human subjects, say scientists.

Via J. Mark Schwanz
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The question is not whether it breached ethical and moral behaviour. The question is what will be done about it if anything?

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Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Aprendiendo a Distancia
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Beyond Flipping Classrooms | Higher Ed Beta @insidehighered

Beyond Flipping Classrooms | Higher Ed Beta @insidehighered | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it

The notion of a "flipped classroom” — students watch recorded lectures outside of class and participate in active learning during class meetings — has gained significant attention in recent years. It's an appealing notion in that it satisfies those who seek to promote active learning in higher education as well as those who feel strongly that the traditional physical classroom should remain the focus of learning.

 

But as historian Shane Landrum writes, there is a steady rise in hybrid and online courses and there is a need, especially in the humanities, for discussions about how to create active, student-centered online learning environments. Online classes are preferable to many students for a range of reasons, including distance, work, and family obligations. Now is the moment to explore new learning opportunities and to debate what we learn along the way.

 

In a series of three blog posts, we will share lessons learned about what online learning environments can offer students. Thinking beyond the MOOC-related hype, what opportunities exist in online education? Does online education push us to rethink and re-envision our approach to teaching and learning? How do we take advantage of online classes for teaching history?


Read more: http://www.insidehighered.com/blogs/higher-ed-beta/beyond-flipping-classrooms#ixzz36KcNrFxX
Inside Higher Ed


Via Alfredo Calderon
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Online and offline teaching requires continuing pedagogic exploration and conversations about what works and what does not. Each new situation, each new student brings a particular autobiography and curriculum that is unique. This calls for reflection that is not just a mirroring back in straight lines, but one that is defractive and refractive bending and distorting the lines.

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Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Teaching Digital Ancient History
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Living in Beta and Moon Shot Dreams – Get Inspired With Powerful Ideas from Molly Schroeder

Living in Beta and Moon Shot Dreams – Get Inspired With Powerful Ideas from Molly Schroeder | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
Lets Inspire our Students (and Fellow Teachers) to Dream Big and Embrace Technology to Empower Their Goals This week I had the pleasure and the privilege of

Via Kevin Kaatz
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The pace of change is increasing, but change has always been with us. I think life is about both question marks and exclamation points. With wonder, we continuously discover.

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Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from critical reasoning
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Undergraduates’ Understanding of Skill-based Learning Outcomes: Can e-portfolios Help?

Undergraduates’ Understanding of Skill-based Learning Outcomes: Can e-portfolios Help? | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it

Many University Undergraduates Struggle to Articulate Skills Learned in Class

While students understand what many of the transferrable skills sought by employers are, a new report examining psychology students at Brock University by the Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario (HEQCO) finds that university undergraduates may not have strong awareness of their skills and the connection to coursework. Students also feel their instructors are not emphasizing the connection between assignments and skills development. 

The authors caution that the issue may not be the actual development of transferrable skills but that students may not be realizing what skills are fostered by specific projects and therefore struggle to articulate how their education gave them the qualities sought by employers.

Undergraduates’ Understanding of Skill-based Learning Outcomes: Can e-portfolios Help?  also examines if tools like e-portfolios, which require students to explicitly track and showcase skills developed during their education, could improve skill awareness. The study finds that while these tools may be useful over time, they had no impact as a one-time-only intervention or at the end of a degree.



Via iPamba
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The findings go against the grain of what is being done in School where portfolios, including digital, are seen as critical. They serve purposes, but to improve skill-awareness might have to be rethought.

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The Rhizome as a Metaphor for Learning in a MOOC

The Rhizome as a Metaphor for Learning in a MOOC | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
This is the first in a series of 4 blog posts which Frances Bell and Jenny Mackness have written in preparation for a presentation that we will give at the ALTMOOCSIG conference – MOOCs - Which Way...
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

A challenge with metaphors i.e. rhizome for teaching and learning is they are never complete which might be the point. We can never fully understand the concept we are conveying within a metaphor. There is always something lacking. For example, a rhizome is a biological term describing one form of asexual reproduction which limits genetic variation. It still can serve as a strong metaphor when we understand what is missing i.e. diversity and multiple voices.

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Chasing The Elusive 'Quality' In Online Education

Chasing The Elusive 'Quality' In Online Education | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it

"A meta-analysis by the U.S. Department of Education in 2010 showed that students performed modestly better in courses with some online component.

However, a more recent study from Columbia University, focusing specifically on community college students, shows that college students are more likely to withdraw from online courses, that they score lower in these courses when they do finish, and that those who begin college with online courses are less likely to persist and complete their degrees."


Via Chris Carter
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

A key point is that we are copying face-to-face pedagogy as if it works without modification for online. The same thing is happening in classrooms where digital technology has been downloaded without any real change in the way teaching and learning are undertaken. We are simply re-organizing the deck chairs and not transforming what we are doing.

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Chris Carter's curator insight, June 27, 8:13 AM

Cogent. Excellent discussion starter.