Educational Leadership and Technology
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7 Excellent iPad Games to Develop Kids Critical Thinking ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

7 Excellent iPad Games to Develop Kids Critical Thinking ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it

Via Sam Gliksman, Yashy Tohsaku
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

Fits with the earlier one scooped about using games in the classroom

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Donna Clark's curator insight, January 8, 2013 12:15 PM

A list of great games designed to improve your students critical thinking and creative powers.Check them out below...

Steven Blomdale's comment, March 9, 2013 10:10 PM
these games will help students develop learning and innovation skills such as critical thinking and problem solving to allow them to succeed in work and life in the 21st century.
Christy P.Novack's curator insight, March 25, 2013 2:53 PM

 Some recommended apps for critical thinking skills. I have not tried any of them yet, so I cannot comment on quality.

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Students Say They Are Not as Tech Savvy as Educators Assume - EdSurge News

Students Say They Are Not as Tech Savvy as Educators Assume - EdSurge News | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it

"A love for avocado lattes and Snapchat filters are just a few of the stereotypes following Millennials these days. But students are now pushing back on these generational generalizations, noting that assumptions regarding their attitudes, hobbies, and abilities are hurting them academically. One of the biggest misconceptions students at last week’s New Media Consortium’s Summer Conference (NMC) brought up was the idea that millennials are digital natives.

"Most people have heard this story before: the eight-year-old son teaching his forty-year-old dad how to use some new device or app. However, despite being an allegory of our times, a lot has been said off-the-record about misconceptions regarding students’ technological abilities. In an interview with EdSurge, Alexandra Pickett, the Director of New York State University’s Center for Online Teaching Excellence, noted that many of her students know how to use online platforms such as Twitter and Facebook for fun, but have no idea how to leverage them for academic and professional use. It’s a point the students at NMC echoed."


Via Jim Lerman, Dean J. Fusto, Bonnie Bracey Sutton, Stephania Savva, Ph.D
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
What we use digital tools for in our daily lives is not what we use them for in classrooms. Neil Selwyn's and Larry Cuban's research have shown that digital tools used poorly do not improve teaching and learning
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Jessica's curator insight, July 17, 7:10 PM
This is something I'd like to address beginning in middle school.
Chris Carter's curator insight, July 25, 7:17 PM
So true. Born into a digital world, we assume kids know how to navigate it. But really, did you know how to navigate your world when you grew up? Most kids are digital "naives" rather than digital natives, knowing just enough to do what they want to do. When I chaired a student-centered panel at EduTECH Asia in Singapore, the kids said the same thing. We should not unnecessarily put students in a box that assumes they know how to use the tools, to full effect, that the digital world provides.
GwynethJones's curator insight, July 25, 9:39 PM

I'm kinda not surprised by this!

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A New, More Rigorous Study Confirms: The More You Use Facebook, the Worse You Feel

A New, More Rigorous Study Confirms: The More You Use Facebook, the Worse You Feel | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
Online social interactions are no substitute for the real thing.
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
"The full story when it comes to online social media use is surely complex. Exposure to the carefully curated images from others’ lives leads to negative self-comparison, and the sheer quantity of social media interaction may detract from more meaningful real-life experiences. What seems quite clear, however, is that online social interactions are no substitute for the real thing."

The use of digital tools and social media should be viewed as the use of a tool. It does not replace human, face-to-face interaction.
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How Parents Can Instill Good Digital Citizenship in Kids

How Parents Can Instill Good Digital Citizenship in Kids | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
Good digital citizenship will only become more important.as our lives increasingly lack the physical context kids need to distinguish good and bad.

Via Ajo Monzó, juandoming
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Parents and teachers working together and communicating can form partnerships to help children learn what it means to be a good digital citizen.

Technology is a conversation about our tools.
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Technology Can Be A Tool, A Teacher, A Trickster

Technology Can Be A Tool, A Teacher, A Trickster | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
Shaping technology to some form of learning could depart pretty radically from the more familiar aim of shaping technology to the way we are now, says psychologist Tania Lombrozo.
Via Martin Debattista
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I am not sure technology is a tool, teacher, or trickster. The etymology of technoloy means a conversation with, about, and through a craftsperson's tools. It takes wisdom to use one's tools well.
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How Education Must Change: Seeking Mission And Purpose In The Jobless Economy

How Education Must Change:  Seeking Mission And Purpose In The Jobless Economy | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
To prepare society for the dramatic changes underway due to technology, education must change. One capability essential for the future-- and absent from most formal education-- is the ability to select and pursue mission and purpose.

Via Stephania Savva, Ph.D, malek, steve batchelder, Roger Francis, Bobby Dillard
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
This might take us back to the etymology of school: a place of leisure and conversation. We have to be careful we are not feeding the next chapter of the neo-liberal agenda and discourse.
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Both Humans and Technology Are Noisy: How Do We Move Forward? - Digital Promise

Both Humans and Technology Are Noisy: How Do We Move Forward? - Digital Promise | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
Accelerating Innovation in Education

Via Elaine J Roberts, Ph.D.
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
It is though-provoking. Heidegger used a hyphen between human and technology (human-technology, suggesting there was an ongoing conversation between a person and their tools. He used the etymology of technology to describe technology as a conversation. The challenge is we do not listen to one of the voices in the conversation.
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Elaine J Roberts, Ph.D.'s curator insight, July 17, 1:30 PM

This is really thought-provoking, and adds another book to my "to read" list.

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Students are Better Off without a Laptop in the Classroom

Students are Better Off without a Laptop in the Classroom | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
What do you think they’ll actually use it for?
Via Martin Debattista
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Digital tools can be a distraction. When students engage in conversations, they can learn more and share their views on what they are learning. Laptops are a tool and need to be used wisely.
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Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, July 14, 2:54 PM
Digital tools can be a distraction. When students engage in conversations, they can learn more and share their views on what they are learning. Laptops are a tool and need to be used wisely.
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8 Tips For Teachers Frustrated With Technology - by Terry Heick

8 Tips For Teachers Frustrated With Technology - by Terry Heick | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
“by Terry Heick”
Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Vicki Moro
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
The tip about planning a parallel lesson without digital tools and access is a good one. The teaching and learning should rise above the tools being used.
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Bev Jones's curator insight, July 15, 6:44 AM
Really useful advise for those who are new to or lack confidence to use technology in their teaching.   Messages echoed in our supported online CPD for teachers.  https://booking.etfoundation.co.uk/course/details/107?return=browse
Jillian Schaibly's curator insight, July 25, 6:15 PM
This article is great for leaders to use when they aren't sure how to use technology. This many times happens in schools and principals may not know how to put a frustrated teacher at ease. This gives some great tips on using technology.
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The Future of Education: Transcending the Status Quo

The Future of Education: Transcending the Status Quo | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
Digital tools in schools and where we are.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas, massimo facchinetti, malek
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
"After reviewing over 160 meta-analyses from over 10,000 studies on the impact of computers in education, Hattie observed that the average effect of digital tools in schools is an anemic d = .34, which is well below the zone of desirable effects. An average effect size of d = .34 is equivalent to a 13 percentile point gain in student achievement (which, theoretically, advances a child from the 50th percentile to the 63rd percentile). This is well below the lowest value in Hattie's range of desired effect sizes. Worse still, this meager impact has not changed in over half a century. Sadly, the overall average impact of computer technology on learning has been meager — particularly considering the vast leaps in digital technologies in the last half century."

This echoed Larry Cuban's research and book: Oversold and underused. A real challenge is the pace of digital change. Pedagogy and teaching remain essential in learning.
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7 Elite Secrets To Focusing In An Age of Distraction

7 Elite Secrets To Focusing In An Age of Distraction | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it

Newport says that managing one's attention not only makes you more productive, but also is, in the words of science writer Winifred Gallagher, “the sine qua non of the good life and the key to improving virtually every aspect of your experience.”
Here are seven tips for learning to do deep work and cultivating time for it.


Via Nik Peachey, Elke Höfler
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Being present is essential to what we are doing and who we are with. It means ignoring distractions i.e. email, being bored, quite social media, etc.
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Nik Peachey's curator insight, June 16, 5:13 AM

Some interesting tips.

Sarah McElrath's curator insight, June 20, 10:35 AM
What would this look like in education? 
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The History of Ed-Tech: What Went Wrong?

The History of Ed-Tech: What Went Wrong? | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
Beth Holland, a doctoral student at JHU and “EdTech Researcher” at Education Week, sent an email asking some questions about the history of ed-tech. The gist of these: how did ed-tech get from the early, inquiry-based pioneers like Seymour Papert to the crap we see today. Once my response hit more than 500 words, I thought I’d better “blog” my thoughts rather than just answer via email…

There’s a popular origin story about education technology: that, it was first developed and adopted by progressive educators, those interested in “learning by doing” and committed to schools as democratic institutions. Then, something changed in the 1980s (or so): computers became commonplace, and ed-tech became commodified – built and sold by corporations, not by professors or by universities. Thus the responsibility for acquiring classroom technology and for determining how it would be used shifted from a handful of innovative educators (often buying hardware and software with their own money) to school administration; once computers were networked, the responsibility shifted to IT. The purpose of ed-tech shifted as well – from creative computing to keyboarding, from projects to “productivity.” (And I’ll admit. I’m guilty of having repeated some form of this narrative myself.)

But what if, to borrow from Ian Bogost, “progressive education technology” – the work of Seymour Papert, for example – was a historical aberration, an accident between broadcast models, not an ideal that was won then lost?

There’s always a danger in nostalgia, when one invents a romanticized past – in this case, a once-upon-a-time when education technology was oriented towards justice and inquiry before it was re-oriented towards test scores and flash cards. But rather than think about “what went wrong,” it might be useful to think about what was wrong all along.

Although Papert was no doubt a pioneer, he wasn’t the first person to recognize the potential for computers in education. And he was hardly alone in the 1960s and 1970s in theorizing or developing educational technologies. There was Patrick Suppes at Stanford, for example, who developed math instruction software for IBM mainframes and who popularized what became known as “computer-assisted instruction.” (Arguably, Papert refers to Suppes’ work in Mindstorms when he refers to “the computer being used to program the child” rather than his own vision of the child programming the computer.)

Indeed, as I’ve argued repeatedly, the history of ed-tech dates at least as far back as the turn of the twentieth century and the foundation of the field of educational psychology. Much of we see in ed-tech today reflects those origins – the work of psychologist Sidney Pressey, the work of psychologist B. F. Skinner, the work of psychologist Edward Thorndike. It reflects those origins because, as historian Ellen Condliffe Lagemann has astutely observed, “One cannot understand the history of education in the United States during the twentieth century unless one realizes that Edward L. Thorndike won and John Dewey lost.”

Ed-tech has always been more Thorndike than Dewey because education has been more Thorndike than Dewey. That means more instructivism than constructionism. That means more multiple choice tests than projects. That means more surveillance than justice.

(How Thorndike's ed-tech is now being rebranded as “personalization” (and by extension, as progressive education) – now that's an interestin

Via Miloš Bajčetić
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
"Ed-tech has always been more Thorndike than Dewey because education has been more Thorndike than Dewey. That means more instructivism than constructionism. That means more multiple choice tests than projects. That means more surveillance than justice."

How sad this is. We need pedagogy. Technology is a conversation with, through, and about the tools we use. It is not the tool.
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Does Zuck Want To Be The Next Gates with Personalized Learning

Does Zuck Want To Be The Next Gates with Personalized Learning | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
The slightly-cranky voice navigating the world of educational "reform" while trying to still pursue the mission of providing quality education.
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
"In other words, the [Personal Learning] "revolution" is about investors and corporations-- not about teachers or educators or schools. It is the new technocratic horizon, with Zuckerberg poised to become for Personalized Learning (at least this particular version of it) what Bill Gates was for the Common Core-- its patron saint, its bank, its armtwister, and all without any real input from people who work in education."

That says it all. We need to stop thinking there is a super person out there who will ride to the recuse. This is another example of a neo-liberal approach to school. Instead of listening to classroom teachers, we want to those furthest away from the classroom set the course. To make matters worse, we have a consultancy class which has spent little time in classrooms and, in some cases, sprinted through that part to tell teachers how to teach.
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Opinion: Forget “digital natives.” Here’s how kids are really using the Internet

Opinion: Forget “digital natives.” Here’s how kids are really using the Internet | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
“ By challenging the assumption that every child growing up today is a one-size-fits all digital native, we can make sure each of them can find their own way to relate to technology — whether using it to accomplish basic tasks or to create new technologies and worlds. Being aware of our kids’ differences now is what could help keep them from drifting apart.”
Via Nik Peachey, Norton Gusky, Vicki Moro
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
The concept of digital natives is outdated and is being replaced by three new concepts. Digital orphans are adept, but received little guidance. Digital exiles have had little exposure to digital tools and the Internet. Digital heirs have received guidance and are adept. The essential message is adult guidance, pedagogy, is key to the use of digital tools, the Internet, and social media.
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Chris Carter's comment, July 5, 9:37 PM
A much more nuanced view, and one that I appreciate. I have long called so-called digital natives "digital naives" because the majority of kids only know enough about tech to use it to accomplish what they wish to accomplish. Tech does not really come any easier for them. Tech is simply more common to them.
Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, July 6, 5:17 AM
Opinion: Forget “digital natives.” Here’s how kids are really using the Internet
Edward Russell's curator insight, July 7, 10:51 AM
beyond these over-simplified tags. this distinction is always interesting, as is how young people actually use tech.
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Are Smartphones Making Us Stupid?

Are Smartphones Making Us Stupid? | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
A new study reports that the mere sight of one's own smartphone—even if the phone is turned off and face down—can create "brain drain" by depleting finite cognitive resources.
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
"Remember: Anytime you (or your children) need to optimize attentional control and cognitive function, keeping smartphones out of sight helps to boost brain power and minimize brain drain."

Smart phones are a tool. How we use them is a conversation.
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How Much Do Educators Care About Edtech Efficacy? Less Than You Might Think - EdSurge News


Dr. Michael Kennedy, an associate professor at the University of Virginia, was relatively sure he knew the answer to this research question: “Whe

Via Elke Höfler, Ines Bieler
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
The administrators I worked for did not even favour digital tools that were referred by poor quality research, let alone high quality research.
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Teachers, Calibrate your Change-o-Meters!

Teachers, Calibrate your Change-o-Meters! | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
Are you keeping up? Are we keeping up?

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
" Digital technologies turn out to be 'both liberating and exploitative, democratizing and disempowering', and was 'described in our interviews as a site of increased individualization of responsibility and individualization of risk – supporting shifts in the nature of teachers’ work that could be seen as weakening collective interests as well as institutional responsibilities.'”

Heidegger argued we should not blindly and lifelessly use tools and we should treat them as the devil's work. Technology is a conversation with, through, and about our tools. Maybe teachers lag behind in some ways, but how do we know that?
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The Global Search for Education: Is Blended Learning Overhyped? Our Teachers Around the World Weigh In

The Global Search for Education: Is Blended Learning Overhyped?  Our Teachers Around the World Weigh In | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it

A decade ago, many predicted that K-12 education might shift entirely online, especially in the upper grades.


Via Elaine J Roberts, Ph.D., Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
There is a point where students need teachers to help guide their learning. The Dreyfus model of expert learning suggests there is a point where students become more independent and able to make sound choices. Teaching is both relational and ethical.
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Elaine J Roberts, Ph.D.'s curator insight, July 17, 2:13 PM

Blended learning is becoming the norm for some educators. I'd like to see more of it implemented with more effect and creativity. I think that's coming as classroom teachers get more confident in how blended learning can help them working smarter for their students and as administrators support their teachers in implementing blended learning in ways that make sense.

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I’m sorry. – Friction Burns – Medium

I’m sorry. – Friction Burns – Medium | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
Hot jeeps, informal settlements and grave personal risks. Churnalism called out at the New York Times and their recent coverage of Bridge International Academies, the Uber of education. Back in April…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
"To me the more mainstream this inspection and the more public a discourse we have about the future of school and the use of technology the better."

We should spend time questioning what it means to reform schools and how entrepreneurs disguised as philanthropists benefit from these reforms. Also, we should question the supposed leading thinkers in how we are changing our schools. Do they understand what it means to teach? Too often, I find the people proposing change are not teachers or have spent little time teaching. At the end of the day, teaching is relational. If you have no experience or limited experience teaching, you likely don't realize this.
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A leading Silicon Valley engineer explains why every tech worker needs a humanities education

A leading Silicon Valley engineer explains why every tech worker needs a humanities education | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
In 2005, the late writer David Foster Wallace delivered a now-famous commencement address. It starts with the story of the fish in water, who spend their lives not even knowing what water is. They are naively unaware of the ocean that permits their existence, and the currents that carry them. The most important educatio

Via David W. Deeds, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Hans-Georg Gadamer wrote about eloquent questions, which are questions without pre-determined answers that structure dialogue between people. That is at the core of this article. A humanities education lifts us up and we find we can experience our environment more fully. We no longer have to be the fish out of water to realize we are out of water.
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David W. Deeds's curator insight, July 15, 6:28 PM

This is interesting! 

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Academic publishing at a crossroads | University Affairs

Academic publishing at a crossroads | University Affairs | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
The shift towards open access is an opportunity to reform academic publishing to better serve the public interest.
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Academic publishing is at a crossroads. There is a reference several times in the article to "public good," but no description as to what it means. There are ethical and practical issues involved in shifts in publishing. Without ethical guides what we are seeing in politics runs the risk of encroaching into academics, if has not already.
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Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, July 14, 2:55 PM
Academic publishing is at a crossroads. There is a reference several times in the article to "public good," but no description as to what it means. There are ethical and practical issues involved in shifts in publishing. Without ethical guides what we are seeing in politics runs the risk of encroaching into academics, if has not already.
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Real things teachers can do to combat fake news

Real things teachers can do to combat fake news | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
What can you do to combat "fake news"? And how do we help kids get savvy about what they're reading? You can start by not lumping all dubious content into one category called fake news, says Michelle Ciulla Lipkin, executive director at the National Association for Media Literacy Education.
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
The article is a question answer between several teachers and PBS education editor Victoria Pasquantonio. There are several videos interspersed.

She closed with the following: "In my classroom at Brooklyn College, I find the following questions elicit incredible conversation: What is missing from this message? How might different people interpret this message differently? Is this fact, opinion, or something else?" There is a link to her website as well.
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Frankenstein and the Monstrosity of Edtech

Frankenstein and the Monstrosity of Edtech | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it

Frankenstein as a meditation on monstrosity in the modern world in general and education (especially the edtech discourse).

 

Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Miloš Bajčetić
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
It is a lengthy article and it took time to get to the monstrosity of edtech. There is a review of the novel Frankenstein its underlying meaning, and how that reflects the world.

I took this quote out as it summarizes the edtech thesis the author is presenting:

"Future-oriented content is science and technology – disciplines valued not because they reveal the deepest truths about ourselves and our world, but because they sustain the Promethean project of domination. The idea that the search for the truth about the human condition might matter more than programming, knowledge filtering, connectivity and maximizing hardware is not worthy of consideration – a laughably antiquated thing with a yellow eye from the point of view of the edtech futurists."

John Dewey subscribed to the notion that we teach children in the present moment, because that is where they live and learn.
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What the 21st-Century Library Looks Like

What the 21st-Century Library Looks Like | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
When DePaul University opened its new library in 1992, the information ecosystem was on the precipice of change. The internet was becoming mainstream and, with it, libraries’ role in providing access to information was crumbling.

Via Elizabeth E Charles
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
The role of digital tools, the Internet, and social media have changed schools and libraries.
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How to Create an E-Learning Portfolio | The Rapid E-Learning Blog

How to Create an E-Learning Portfolio | The Rapid E-Learning Blog | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
What Goes in the Portfolio?
The portfolio represents your skills and expertise. You need to decide if you want the portfolio to be static where you only do occasional maintenance and updates. Or do you want a site that’s more dynamic and continually updating?

Via Dennis T OConnor, Stewart-Marshall
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I might be able to use this when I begin teaching at the university level.
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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, June 6, 1:31 PM

Here's a "Tool Review" article that also covers the basic elements of an online portfolio. This is aimed at instructional designers, but also speaks to online teachers. 

Jillian Schaibly's curator insight, July 25, 5:31 PM
This is a great resource for a leader in a high school. This can help a student to create a online e portfolio to collect important items that can help with getting into college or getting a job out of high school. This also can be helpful for a school as it can be use to create a school portfolio and display student accomplishment.
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Space Matters: Lessons Learned from an Active-Learning Classroom - EdSurge News

Too many discussions of edtech focus on tools (like tablets, clickers, learning-management systems, smart boards, etc). More thought should be spent o
Via Martin Debattista
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
More thought should be given to the human aspect of learning with digital tools, the Internet, social media, etc. We should think about content, classroom design, the tools, etc. but they play a seconary role to people
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