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The evolution of computers in the classroom

The evolution of computers in the classroom | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
The proliferation of tablets maybe the most revolutionary addition of technology in the classroom, but the path was paved with other tools. PostTV took a detailed look at some of the milestones in classroom technology from the past several decades:

Via Dennis T OConnor, Jim Goldsmith, Dean J. Fusto, Bonnie Bracey Sutton
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

This is an interesting time line and history. Where innovations in digital technologies were spaced out over years now impactful ones are emerging yearly. Somehow the pace does not seem to be slowing. What that means in School is an important and ongoing question.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, July 21, 4:54 AM

I've lived this timeline. Tablets are another stop on the Oregon Trail of Tech I've seen come and go.  


Indeed, tablets are so two hours ago... I'm surprised this timeline misses a little development called mobile learnig. 

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When parents are the ones too distracted by devices

When parents are the ones too distracted by devices | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it

Having a teenager lost in his or her cellphone — texting friends and communicating with parents in monosyllabic grunts — has become a trope of the Internet age. But teens are not the only ones distracted by their devices.

Many parents have the same problem. As much as I hate to admit it, I'm one of them.

A couple weeks ago, my 12-year-daughter, Ella, staged an intervention. She and my wife basically threatened to take my phone and break it.

"Sometimes at night you'll just stand around and ... you'll have your phone out and you'll just type and you'll just stand there," Ella says.

Ella can be a brutal mimic. And as she describes my distraction, she strikes up my smartphone pose: the phone balanced against my belly — thumbs madly typing away — (as if by holding the phone that way no one will notice that I'm on it).

"Lila's ready to go to bed, everybody's trying to get people to read to them and you're just standing there in the middle of the hallway reading your texts and texting other people," she adds.

Hearing from my oldest that I'm ignoring her little sister stings.

"Has that gotten worse?" I ask.

"It hasn't really changed; it got worse when we moved to California," Ella says.

That was when I started covering technology.

"Do you feel jealous of my cellphone? Do you get mad at it?" I ask.

That earns an eye roll and a laugh.

"No, why would I get jealous of a cellphone?"

"I don't know," I say. "Do you feel like you are competing for attention?"

"Yeah."

With that she wins the argument.

And Ella isn't the only kid who feels this way about her parent's relationship with devices.

, a clinical and consulting psychologist at Harvard, recently wrote . For her book, Steiner-Adair interviewed more than 1,000 kids from the ages of 4 to 18. She talked to hundreds of teachers and parents.

"One of the many things that absolutely knocked my socks off," she says, "was the consistency with which children — whether they were 4 or 8 or 18 or 24 — talked about feeling exhausted and frustrated and sad or mad trying to get their parents' attention, competing with computer screens or iPhone screens or any kind of technology, much like in therapy you hear kids talk about sibling rivalry."

Steiner-Adair says one of the challenges we all face is that these devices are wired to grab our attention and keep it. She says the most successful apps are popular, even addictive, because they in our brains.

"Yes, when you are plugged into your screen the part of your brain that lights up is the to-do list," Steiner-Adair says. "Everything feels urgent — everything feels a little exciting. We get a little dopamine hit when we accomplish another email — check this, check that. And when a child is waiting by or comes into your room and it's one of those mini-moments and you don't know — that's the hard thing about parenting — you don't know if this is the ordinary question or they're coming with something really important. It's very hard as a grown-up to disengage and give them your attention with the [same] warmth that you give them, the same tone of voice that you greet them if they interrupt you when you're scrambling eggs."

A couple of years ago, my daughter got a laptop for school. And because she was becoming more independent, we got her a phone. We set up rules for when she could use this stuff and when she'd need to put it away. We created a charging station, outside her bedroom, where she had to plug in these devices every night. Basically — except for homework — she has to put it all away when she comes home.

Steiner-Adair says most adults don't set up similar limits in their own lives.

"We've lost the boundaries that protect work and family life," she says. "So it is very hard to manage yourself and be as present to your children in the moments they need you."

Steiner-Adair says that whether you are a parent or not, carving out time to turn off your devices — to disconnect from the wired world and engage with the real people who are all around you — is one of the best gifts you can give yourself and the people your love.

After my daughter's little intervention, I made myself a promise to create my own charging station. To plug my phone in — somewhere far away — when I am done working for the day. I've been trying to leave it there untouched for most of the weekend.

And while I still find myself reaching for it — or checking my pocket — leaving my phone behind is also kind of freeing. Last weekend, instead of checking Twitter and reading tech blogs I built a treehouse.


Via Vilma Bonilla
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Adults face tech challenges. I know school managers who cannot greet someone properly due to their inability to look away from their PDA. Is that example we want for children?

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Vilma Bonilla's curator insight, April 17, 4:03 PM

The importance of disengagement and setting up boundaries. - "Parents often complain that smartphones keep their kids distracted from conversation. What happens when it's the other way around, when kids can't get their smartphone-glued parents' attention?"

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Assessment & Teaching of 21st-Century Skills - great resources, white papers, and resource kits


Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Who is designing these products?

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Ness Crouch's curator insight, January 14, 9:27 PM

Great resources. 

holbel mendez's curator insight, January 15, 9:38 PM

"Learn about the critical skills students need to be successful in the digital age and beyond"

Lisa Marie Blaschke's curator insight, January 16, 6:04 AM

Good resource for information on the skills needed by today's learners.

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The Teacher's Guides To Technology And Learning - Edudemic

The Teacher's Guides To Technology And Learning - Edudemic | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
We've gone through hundreds of resources to assemble these guides which are meant to help you learn, teach, and share as much as possible.

Via Linda Alexander
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I don't know if they are all helpful in Canada, but some will be.

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Linda Alexander's curator insight, January 10, 5:06 PM

Wow!  All the various tech guides right at your fingertips and all in one place.

Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from iGeneration - 21st Century Education
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17 Tech Terms Connected Educators Must Know - Edudemic

17 Tech Terms Connected Educators Must Know - Edudemic | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
Time to update your virtual vocabulary! These tech terms are important for all connected educators to know about.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

This is an interesting infographic.

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N Kaspar's curator insight, August 8, 2013 11:20 AM

I like the glassed up idea.

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How Many Teachers Use Technology in the Classroom?

How Many Teachers Use Technology in the Classroom? | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
Remember the good old days of reading textbooks in school and taking notes from a chalkboard? Yeah, neither do we. PBS Learning Media, in preparation for Digital Learning Day on... (RT @dp_geopol: How Many Teachers Use Technology in the Classroom?

Via Digital Georgia
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

This is definitely an important question. What uses do they have for technology? What criteria helps them make decisions?

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Support "tech - shy" teachers to see the benefits of technology in their classroom

Support "tech - shy" teachers to see the benefits of technology in their classroom | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
Strategies to get your technology-shy teachers to take a chance on new tools.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

One thing that would be helpful is not to force digital technologies on good teachers. They need support and it can be provided by providing them with opportunities to plan their professional development. They other thing that is important is do not assume that resistance is being tech shy. I resisted, but am hardly tech shy. What I resisted was the external experts who thought they knew more about my teaching and students than I did.

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Marisol Pamela Hernández Orellana's curator insight, May 13, 9:49 AM

Ninguna herramienta Tecnológica es infalible y ante ello siempre hay que tener un plan B...calma y asumir que navegamos en aguas caóticas que nos implicarán flexibilidad!!!!


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The Rise of the Super-Digital Native

The Rise of the Super-Digital Native | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it

The super-digital native will be bold. The super-digital native will be fearless. The super-digital native will be equipped with best practices for engaging critically with technology for teaching and learning.


Via EDTC@UTB, Jamie Forshey, Lynnette Van Dyke, TechinBiz
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Reading Stuart Kaufman's work in complexity science suggests it might look quite different than this. He proposes that technology will come and go which means, as Marcus Wright suggests, we need to provide wisdom and understanding to the current generation so they can teach the next generation.

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aanve's curator insight, March 15, 10:59 PM

www.aanve.com

 

Jamie Ruppert's curator insight, March 17, 8:53 AM

Who are the super digital natives, anyway?

Rosemary Tyrrell's curator insight, March 17, 1:58 PM

Somewhat Utopian, but interesting article. 

Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Technology in Business Today
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How Technology is helping us with our Education Today

How Technology is helping us with our Education Today | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
Technology in Education
An infographic focusing on the theme of Technology in Education.
How different types of technology help students to learn more and more
efficiently, Also how social media,

Via TechinBiz
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Technology is helpful, but does not replace the human touch of a good teacher. It requires thoughtful and mindful decisions based on context to make education work.

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Lori Wilk's curator insight, January 11, 12:26 PM

Very helpful information

Deborah Rinio's curator insight, January 13, 12:12 PM

Check out this infographic about the changing use of technology in education.

Professor Jill Jameson's curator insight, January 14, 9:51 PM

Useful infographic

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Intel Sees a Future Where We Will Form “Relationships” with Our Gadgets: Scientific American

Intel Sees a Future Where We Will Form “Relationships” with Our Gadgets: Scientific American | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
Company cultural anthropologist Genevieve Bell tells us to get ready to take our fondness for smartphones, tablets and other devices to the next level

Via Sharrock, Lynnette Van Dyke
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

This has some scary implications. Will we know how to unplug?

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Sharrock's curator insight, October 15, 2013 10:13 AM

Interesting quote: "We talk about it as though it was one world, but we’ve truthfully been in a world of multiple Internets for at least a decade, even if you just talk about it in terms of physical infrastructure. [South] Korea has true two-way Internet—high-speed uploading and high-speed downloading, no throttle. On the other hand, in places like Australia download is a seven-to-one ratio to upload, which means it’s much easier to consume content than it is to create and share it. That means the Internet feels different [to people in different places]."

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Integrating Tech into the Classroom - Great resources and tutorials from Gooru Learning

Integrating Tech into the Classroom - Great resources and tutorials from Gooru Learning | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , ICTPHMS
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Gooru looks like a useful tool.

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Siri Anderson's curator insight, May 9, 2013 10:58 AM

Fantastic resource for finding content that operates at various levels.

Tom Perran's curator insight, May 9, 2013 12:07 PM

Everyone should bookmark, scoop, pin or retweet this!

Ness Crouch's curator insight, May 23, 2013 4:37 PM

Wow! If this is as good as it looks I think this would make organising learning for younger children easier. I'll have to check it out in more detail though