Educational Leadership and Technology
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Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from learner driven
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The irresistible urge for students to talk

The irresistible urge for students to talk | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it

From Academica Top Ten, Friday April 11, 2014

"

MOOCs go bricks and mortarMassive open online courses (MOOCs) have become increasingly popular in countries around the globe, with Coursera alone registering more than 7 million users – more than the entire university population of the UK and France combined. But students in these MOOCs, which are essentially designed around independent, self-guided learning, are becoming more interested in learning with others. Learning hubs, where students meet to take MOOCs together, have popped up all over in many different forms. Some are more formal, where students follow online lectures and assignments together, and others are casual meet-ups where students discuss topics and assignments with others taking the same MOOC. Some learning hubs, like one in Moscow, Russia, recruit experts to answer questions and act as mentors. Traditionally, MOOCs have very low completion rates, but according to Coursera’s coordinator of international development, completion rates for students attending learning hubs is much higher, between 30-100%. BBC"


Via iPamba
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Online may never be completely online.

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Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from learner driven
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Stanford Economist: Elite Colleges Should Not Give Credit for MOOCs – Wired Campus - Blogs - The Chronicle of Higher Education

Stanford Economist: Elite Colleges Should Not Give Credit for MOOCs – Wired Campus - Blogs - The Chronicle of Higher Education | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it

Her conclusions—that MOOCs provide a more suitable substitute for certain nonselective-college programs than for selective ones—are not necessarily as intriguing as her analysis, which frames the issue in economic terms.

Highly selective institutions like Stanford do not so much sell education programs and services for an upfront fee, Ms. Hoxby writes. Instead, they invest in promising students who are likely to attain wealth and influence after college. Only a fraction of those students will end up making significant gifts to the institution later in life, but those gifts subsidize the programs and services Stanford supplies to all its other students.

The sustainability of that “virtuous circle” depends on those talented students’ feeling a deep emotional connection to their alma mater, writes the Stanford professor. If selective colleges began granting credit to students who succeeded in their MOOCs, it could compromise the more traditional “human-capital investments” in their portfolios, she says.


Via iPamba
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

This is interesting.

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iPamba's curator insight, January 28, 2014 12:31 PM

Making the elitist case of US vs. THEM

Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from learner driven
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How can universities stop students cheating online?

How can universities stop students cheating online? | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
From keyboards that recognise your typing style to university honour codes – course providers are finding new ways to stop plagiarism among students

Via iPamba
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

What is cheating? That is likely a better question. The idea my sister would do my typing is not cheating. I may have provided the hand-written material. What about the work of editors? Is that cheating?

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Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Create, Innovate & Evaluate in Higher Education
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Purpose and Quality of MOOCs

Purpose and Quality of MOOCs | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
Thanks to Grainne Conole for the post on MOOCs and a New Classification of MOOCs, where she has critiqued thoroughly on quality assurance of MOOCs from a course and instructional design perspective...

Via Alfredo Corell
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Quality might look different but quality still has to meet a high standard. What are we doing to ensure that?

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Alfredo Corell's curator insight, May 28, 2013 2:45 PM

Quality in online education, in particular MOOCs might be defined differently from those quality in classroom education, with a face-to-face teaching environment. What is quality of MOOC from the perspective of educators, learners, and employers?

Pamela Bartar's curator insight, May 29, 2013 5:07 AM

thinking about a general quality check list, which coult be helpful.