Educational Leadership and Technology
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Confessions of a Luddite professor

Confessions of a Luddite professor | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
I had the good fortune on Wednesday to hear economist Robert Gordon talk about his magnum opus, “The Rise and Fall of American Economic Growth.” Gordon has a somber tale to tell. He argues that U.S. economic growth ain’t what it used to be, and that ain’t gonna change over the next 25 years. This is due to myriad headwinds such as demographic slowdowns, rising inequality, fiscal constraints, and — most important — the failure of newer technologies to jumpstart economic growth the way that the Second Industrial Revolution did.

[U.S. economy slows, with GDP growing 0.5% in first quarter]

It’s his last point — about the effect of information technology on productivity — that prompts so much fierce debate. Economists are furiously debating whether the visible innovations in the information sector are leading to productivity advances that are going undetected in the current productivity statistics. On the one hand, the aggregate data suggests a serious productivity slowdown over the past decade. On the other hand, Google’s chief economist, Hal Varian, insists that “there is a lack of appreciation for what’s happening in Silicon Valley, because we don’t have a good way to measure it.”

Surely, there are sectors, such as higher education, in which technological innovations can yield significant productivity gains, right? All that talk about MOOCs and flipped classrooms and the like will make a difference in productivity, yes?

As an optimist, I’ve long resisted Gordon’s argument — but this is one area where I’m beginning to suspect that he’s right and Silicon Valley is wrong.

Via Miloš Bajčetić
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
Data is raw information that has to be interpreted and judged as to what it means. The risk we run with digital technologies, including the Internet, is that we present data as meaningful without thoughtful consideration. It is why teachers remain vital to the educational enterprise.
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The Ideology of the Blockchain (for Education)

The Ideology of the Blockchain (for Education) | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
All digital technology is ideological. All education technology is ideological.

I repeat this (and quite often, it seems) because technology – and ed-tech in particular – is too frequently discussed as though it is ideology-free. It purports to be at once (and, yet, incongruously) both neutral and necessary. It presents itself at once as value-free (and, yet, incongruously) progressive. That is to say, if technology contains any ideological underpinning at all, we’re supposed to believe, it’s that its forward march is quite inevitable; but that’s okay as it is forward movement – technology serves to make the world better.

This sort of end-of-history, post-ideology ideology that permeates digital technologies (conveniently) frames challenges and criticisms and questions as “ideological” in which “ideological” here means politically-loaded, polemical, biased, bad.

That’s not what I mean when I write that digital technology is ideological or that education technology is ideological. I don’t mean simply that these are interwoven with a certain politics or that they represent developments that I find personally disagreeable. Rather, “ideology” as I use the word refers to the ideas, values, and practices – discourse and power – grounded in the forces of production (e.g. global capitalism) and in the institutions that re-inscribe these. “Ideology” is one way we can think about social struggles, especially as various groups try to legitimate their own interests and do so in such a way that their ideas, values, and practices are seen as natural.

Technologies, particularly the new computer and communications technologies of the twentieth century onward, help reinforce dominant ideology in powerful ways, but these technologies also have their own ideological underpinnings as well, ones that serve in turn to justify and reinforce the cultural and economic changes that society is currently undergoing. Think “Sharing Economy,” for example. This is also, in part at least, what Neil Postman famously described over twenty years ago as the growing pervasiveness of “Technopoly”:

Technopoly eliminates alternatives to itself in precisely the way Aldous Huxley outlined in Brave New World. It does not make them illegal. It does not make them immoral. It does not even make them unpopular. It makes them invisible and therefore irrelevant. And it does so by redefining what we mean by religion, by art, by family, by politics, by history, by truth, by privacy, by intelligence, so that our definitions fit its new requirements. Technopoly, in other words, is totalitarian technocracy.

Via Miloš Bajčetić
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
This is a series of articles that deal with the use of digital technologies in schools. What does it mean? The articles draw on new (Neil Selwyn) thinkers and some that were writing at the early stages of the digital revoluation (Neil Postman). However, you can go back further and read concerns expressed by Heidegger, Arendt, Gadamer, Derrida, etc. and more recently: Turkle and others.

Technology is a conversation between a craftsperson and their tools.
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Meeting Students Where They Are

Meeting Students Where They Are | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
When I was applying to college, I wanted to go to one of the best schools. At the time, I thought of “the best,” as the colleges that were the most selective. I applied to Harvard, Yale, and
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
There are two things that stick out for me in the article. Universities have to meet students where they are and some universities are better equipped to help make the experience for students who struggled better.

We cannot fix education and school. What we can do, is encourage teachers and professors to think about the relationships they have with students in a compassionate and thoughtful manner. That will take different leadership than we see in our schools and universities where outsiders have the fixes.
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Cartoons on Computers in Our Lives

Cartoons on Computers in Our Lives | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
Trite as it is to say, but interacting with computers in work, social media, and other parts of our lives is pervasive for readers of this blog. So for this month's cartoon feature, I have picked a few that tickled me. Enjoy!                          …
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
Sometimes humour helps us better understand relationships with our tools.
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Pedagogy comes first | Co-inventing the Curriculum | LEARNing To LEARN

Pedagogy comes first | Co-inventing the Curriculum | LEARNing To LEARN | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it

Student empowerment is the strongest connective theme through the 55 posts and interviews I’ve conducted for this blog.  The educators I’ve interviewed all have one characteristic in common: they all enable students to take more control over and responsibility for their own learning.

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Learn more:

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https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/10/03/design-the-learning-of-your-learners-students-ideas/

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https://gustmees.files.wordpress.com/2015/02/practice-21st-century-assessment-flowchart-page2-pdf.pdf

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https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2015/01/28/practice-learning-to-learn-example-2/

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https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2013/01/23/is-your-professional-development-up-to-date/

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Via Gust MEES, Silvia Nascimento
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Curriculum-as-lived and currere are not new ideas. They have been forming for the last 40 years plus. We did not need digital technologies to come with this idea. It should have been firmly entrenched and it is not. 

 

@ivon_ehd1

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Gust MEES's curator insight, March 4, 2015 2:40 PM

Student empowerment is the strongest connective theme through the 55 posts and interviews I’ve conducted for this blog.  The educators I’ve interviewed all have one characteristic in common: they all enable students to take more control over and responsibility for their own learning.

.

Learn more:

.

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/10/03/design-the-learning-of-your-learners-students-ideas/

.

https://gustmees.files.wordpress.com/2015/02/practice-21st-century-assessment-flowchart-page2-pdf.pdf

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https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2015/01/28/practice-learning-to-learn-example-2/

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https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2013/01/23/is-your-professional-development-up-to-date/

.

RESENTICE's curator insight, March 6, 2015 8:09 AM

Le numérique au service de la pédagogie... 

Audrey's curator insight, April 3, 2015 2:51 PM

Absolutely agree, students who take responsibility for their learning do so much better when taking exams.  In addition, when  a student can teach you and put forward their own evaluative commentary, they are ready for university.

Audrey for http://www.homeschoolsource.co.uk

www.hotmoodle.com

 

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Education in the Digital Era: opening a discussion on quality

Education in the Digital Era: opening a discussion on quality | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it

New technologies have made massive changes in our way of life, including in education. Within the education field, the effects of technology touch almost every area of practice, including curricula, pedagogy, and assessment. What's more, it is changing the needs and expectations of learners. The traditional modes of teaching are not adequate to meet the needs of today's students in terms of the competencies and skills that they will need for the future. 

 

The new normal of education is based on lifelong learning, open learning, and the use of open educational resources. Courses are expected to be participatory, collaborative, and supportive of distributed intelligences. In this new state of normal, new education providers are emerging that can provide new solutions for the needs of learners in the digital era. 

 

Questions of Quality

 In the framework of new modes of teaching and learning from new providers, one of the big questions is that of quality. Some of the questions that we wish to address at the conference and in the pre-conference dialogue include:

 

· How can we identify and assess high-quality new content when it is developing and changing so rapidly?

· Which tools and which online learning environments best support quality of learning? 

· How can we be sure about the quality of the teaching approach or about the teacher's qualification and assessment?

· How can we develop a quality assurance mechanism that could ensure quality at all levels in formal, informal and non        formal education?

· Does EU need to provide some specific quality standards/guidelines in order to have a common understanding of what is good quality in Education?

· What is the current state of Quality in Education in Europe?

· Is there a European policy regarding Quality in Education?

 

Quality Assurance in Europe

 

In the current European quality assurance landscape, the European Parliament and Council has adopted a resolution promoting the uses of the European Standards and Guidelines for Quality Assurance  (ESG). The ESG is implemented in member states through independent quality assurance agencies that are registered with the European Quality Assurance Register (EQAR) for higher education.

 

The European Association for Quality Assurance in Higher Education (ENQA)  is an umbrella organisation which represents quality assurance organisations from the European Higher Education Area (EHEA) member states. ENQA promotes European co-operation in the field of quality assurance in higher education and disseminates information and expertise among its members and towards stakeholders in order to develop and share good practice and to foster the European dimension of quality assurance.

 

EQAVET is a community of practice bringing together Member States, Social Partners and the European Commission to promote quality assurance in vocational education and training. Two more important initiatives connected to quality in e-Learning and to Open Education are The European Foundation for Quality in e-Learning (EFQUEL) and Open Educational Quality (OPAL). 

 

Join the discussion

 

There are numerous ways to join the debate. Your thoughts, opinions, and questions are welcome:

· On this website, visit the conference page

· On Facebook, join the group

· On Twitter, use the hashtags #EdDigEra_quality, #EdDigEra or #OpenEdu


Via QLET, Harvey Mellar, Julie Tardy, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The pace of change is such that eloquent questions which have no presupposed answers are essential to getting to the heart of learning and how to use the tools, old and new.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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QLET's curator insight, November 21, 2014 6:12 AM

"The EC and the Italian Presidency of the EU are hosting a high level conference on Education in the Digital Era on December 11th. The pre-conference dialog has already begun on various online platforms and you are all welcome to participate. The main topic of discussion is quality and relevance in learning."

Deborah Banker's curator insight, December 7, 2014 7:24 PM

Very interesting

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Moral Character Matters | Social Media | Education | eSkills | eCitizen

Moral Character Matters | Social Media | Education | eSkills | eCitizen | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
There’s a direct correlation between moral character and success. We lose something very important when character is treated as an afterthought.

 

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Character

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Ethics

 


Via Gust MEES, Dan Kirsch
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Character matters. That is challenging in the digital age. How do we know the person who is posting?

 

@ivon_ehd1

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Gust MEES's curator insight, October 21, 2014 10:56 AM
There’s a direct correlation between moral character and success. We lose something very important when character is treated as an afterthought.


Learn more:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Character


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Ethics


Melissa Marshall's curator insight, October 22, 2014 2:14 AM
There’s a direct correlation between moral character and success. We lose something very important when character is treated as an afterthought.
 Developing moral character is something we need to address in schools - and it becomes more pertinent through the lens of social media interactions. 
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Teachers as Technology Trailblazers: Why Sharing Your Good Work Is Necessary, Not Boastful

Teachers as Technology Trailblazers: Why Sharing Your Good Work Is Necessary, Not Boastful | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it

 

 

 

 

 

 

However, it's critical that we add our voices, the voices of educators, to the conversation. Whether you use social media or not, share your good work. Share the progress your learners are making. BRAG. If you don't do it, no one will!

 


Via Gust MEES
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Sharing what we do well is important. The challenge with social media is that it is not always clear the person sharing is actually in the classroom and when they were last there.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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Gust MEES's curator insight, September 15, 2014 8:22 PM

However, it's critical that we add our voices, the voices of educators, to the conversation. Whether you use social media or not, share your good work. Share the progress your learners are making. BRAG. If you don't do it, no one will!


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Education vs Learning - What Exactly is the Difference? - EdTechReview™ (ETR)

Education vs Learning - What Exactly is the Difference? - EdTechReview™ (ETR) | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
Surely learning and formal education are not entirely the same thing? But what exactly is the difference?

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Aki Puustinen, Suvi Salo
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

There are two intertwined definitions of education and only one is included here. Educare is leading students out of child. Educere is allowing students to gain control over their learning and realizing they have support when needed. We have eliminated the latter replacing it with the instrumental version called learning which is what School is about.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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Terry Doherty's curator insight, August 9, 2014 10:51 AM

Nice comparisons and contrasts to make understanding easier.

Ness Crouch's curator insight, April 15, 2015 7:51 PM

Excellent read. I recommend taking a look at this article. Sometimes the lines between education and learning can be blurry. Time to clear that up.

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Talking to parents in 140 characters: how are schools using social media?

Talking to parents in 140 characters: how are schools using social media? | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it

Social media isn't just about cyberbullying and selfies. Journalist Lucy Ward explores how schools are using the likes of Twitter and Facebook to engage parents • 10 tips for how schools use social media.

 

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Parents

 


Via Gust MEES, Aki Puustinen, Dean J. Fusto, Nancy J. Herr
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

There is no doubt that social media provide excellent ways to communicate with parents, but they are not the only ways. It is one way that includes face-to-face conversations. It would be interesting to find out what Derrida might conclude in using his concept differance which was not a correctly spelled word.

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Nancy J. Herr's curator insight, July 18, 2014 3:28 PM

As more schools and administrators are seeing the value of social media,  topics like this one can help.

Mark McLendon's curator insight, July 19, 2014 10:21 PM

Tweeting for teachers.

Kim Lindskog's curator insight, July 25, 2014 5:19 PM

Twitter tips for reaching parents. 

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Teachers as Technology Trailblazers: The 2014 Horizon Report Focuses on Pedagogy

Teachers as Technology Trailblazers: The 2014 Horizon Report Focuses on Pedagogy | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it

The Horizon Report, an annual paper that focuses on the emerging trends for technology and schools, is often recognized for the ways it analyzes TOOLS.

.However, this year, it's taken a different approach. The insightful group of educators (including my boss, Rob Mancabelli) guiding the report decided that the two fast trends for teaching and learning with technology are strongly focused onPEDAGOGY. .Specifically, the two fast trends are cited in the report as follows:Rethinking the roles of teachersShift to deeper learning approachesIn short, the changes that are happening this year specifically relate to the way we teach and the way we learn. 


Via Gust MEES
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Creating policies and rethinking teachers' roles is about including teachers in the conversation. Most of what I experienced was download and offloading. This was particularly the case towards the end of my career.

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Gust MEES's curator insight, July 8, 2014 8:13 AM
Specifically, the two fast trends are cited in the report as follows:
  • Rethinking the roles of teachers
  • Shift to deeper learning approaches
In short, the changes that are happening this year specifically relate to the way we teach and the way we learn.
Scott Anderson (Daymap)'s curator insight, July 13, 2014 11:00 PM

The 2014 Horizon Report Focuses on Pedagogy. Have a look at the link below, and let us know - which horizon are you chasing?

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Five Big Changes to the Future of Teacher Education

Five Big Changes to the Future of Teacher Education | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it

Getty In the book Teaching 2030 by Barnett Berry and 12 classroom experts, the authors pinpoint specific skills educators will need to teach in the schools of tomorrow.

 

They say teachers must be prepared to find and adapt new technologies to engage the digital generation, as well as work across traditional subject areas using project learning.

 

They must be able to use data and evidence to inform their practice and know how to work in both virtual learning environments and brick-and-mortar schools. And they’ll need to collaborate with community-based organizations and work in schools that provide all kinds of other services for students and their families.

 

Along those lines, Berry has outlined five changes he believes need to be made to the future of teacher education.

 


Via Gust MEES, Dawn Altman
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The first point is interesting. Only 70% of the 170, 000 American education school graduates enter classrooms. I suspect the Canadian percentage might be similar.

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Ludmila Smirnova's curator insight, May 14, 2014 3:37 PM

It is so true, Gust! Teaching is not transmitting the knowledge, it is igniting the light for learning through collaboration, curation and teacher's passion for learning!

Dorothy Retha Cook's curator insight, May 18, 2015 4:50 PM

GREAT WORK! WE ALL CAN LEARN FROM AT ALL LEVELS!

Olaya Alvarez's curator insight, May 30, 2015 5:37 PM

Teacher education programs need to ensure that pre-service teachers learn crucial skills for their future work as educators

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BYOD Pros and Cons in Education [Infographic]

BYOD Pros and Cons in Education [Infographic] | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
The BYOD Pros and Cons in Education Infographic highlights many of the advantages and disadvantages to letting students use personal devices in the classrooms.

 

Learn more:

 

http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2012/07/07/bring-your-own-device-advantages-dangers-and-risks/http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?q=BYOD

 


Via Gust MEES
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

One of the unstated aspects of the emerging hidden curriculum is that we are connected 24/7 to our work. We learn this in school. Furthermore, we now provide our employers with our devices to do their work.

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Gust MEES's curator insight, April 9, 2014 10:54 AM


The BYOD Pros and Cons in Education Infographic highlights many of the advantages and disadvantages to letting students use personal devices in the classrooms.


Learn more:



Monty Bell's curator insight, April 10, 2014 11:35 AM

A balanced discussion on a very contentious issue

Apptimate's curator insight, April 22, 2014 6:36 AM

This infographic is about BYOD in education, but I think it is applicable to most enterprise BYOD strategies.

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Is Your District Future Ready? -- THE Journal

Is Your District Future Ready? -- THE Journal | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
Encouraging school leaders to think deeply about equity, agency and leadership when actualizing or revisioning technology integration plans.

Via Norton Gusky, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
Are we listening to classroom teachers? My experience suggests we are not. Change is just done to them.
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Norton Gusky's curator insight, April 20, 3:15 PM
T.H.E. Journal looks at the National Education Technology Plan as a tool to make school systems future ready.
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Most Grads Say College Taught Them Few Critical Thinking Skills

Most Grads Say College Taught Them Few Critical Thinking Skills | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
Millennials find that what they learned getting their degree is only the beginning of what they need to know to succeed in the workplace.
Via TechinBiz
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
In my interviews, I am finding a similar theme. Theoretical knowledge has to have practical application or it loses its potential. The same can be said for being professionally developed. If teaches don't use the information and if it is of no practical value, it falls by the wayside.
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Virtual School Days - A New Experiment - Simplek12

Virtual School Days - A New Experiment - Simplek12 | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
Have you heard of virtual school days? It's the latest trend some schools are testing. Learn more about this trend here and then weigh in with your opinion.
Via Elaine J Roberts, Ph.D.
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I like the idea of virtual school days, but I also know that as a procasinator, I would have had trouble working at home to get my school work. I likely would have been just as bored and distracted. I'm working with a high school that has kids taking some classes online, but those kids work in a classroom to work on their online courses and there is a coach/mentor in the room at all times. She helps keep them on task, but is also there to answer questions if they get stuck. Maybe that's the transition phase for some schools as they explore the possibility of virtual school days.


It would not be for everyone.

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Elaine J Roberts, Ph.D.'s curator insight, March 29, 9:15 AM

I like the idea of virtual school days, but I also know that as a procasinator, I would have had trouble working at home to get my school work. I likely would have been just as bored and distracted. I'm working with a high school that has kids taking some classes online, but those kids work in a classroom to work on their online courses and there is a coach/mentor in the room at all times. She helps keep them on task, but is also there to answer questions if they get stuck. Maybe that's the transition phase for some schools as they explore the possibility of virtual school days.

Lynnette Van Dyke's curator insight, March 29, 9:29 PM

I like the idea of virtual school days, but I also know that as a procasinator, I would have had trouble working at home to get my school work. I likely would have been just as bored and distracted. I'm working with a high school that has kids taking some classes online, but those kids work in a classroom to work on their online courses and there is a coach/mentor in the room at all times. She helps keep them on task, but is also there to answer questions if they get stuck. Maybe that's the transition phase for some schools as they explore the possibility of virtual school days.

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Adjusting Your Teaching To Increasingly Powerful Technology

Adjusting Your Teaching To Increasingly Powerful Technology | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it

"Curiosity, likely an evolutionary adaptive, is a raw appetite for information that helped us survive. But that same aggressive appetite for information and experience changes in the face of information abundance, and not always for the better."


Via EDTECH@UTRGV, Miloš Bajčetić, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
Etymologically, technology is about having a conversation with and through a craftperson's tools. It is a way of being at home and knowing one's tools and one's relationship with those tools.
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Walter Gassenferth's curator insight, March 23, 9:25 AM
Very interesting subject to be considered and discussed. I will disclose the post to my contacts and subscribers in http://www.quanticaconsultoria.com
Julie Zulewski's curator insight, March 23, 9:33 AM
I
Interesting article. Worth a look. 
 
EdfoGlobal's comment, March 25, 3:08 AM
www.edfoglobal.com is a educational portal that provides end to end solution for each and every need of a student under one platform (be it Information from Playschool to PhD, Coaching Centres, Sports, Admissions, Educational Loans, Career Counselling, Supply of Curriculum Books and the like)
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The World's Top 10 Most Innovative Companies of 2015 in Education

The World's Top 10 Most Innovative Companies of 2015 in Education | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
From inspiring life-long learning to empowering teachers, these organizations are taking the education business to school.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Nicholas Fragkias
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

There are some interesting ideas here. With a concept and structure like Ed Camps, what does that mean to the way School is organized? I would think it might lead to change the status quo won't like.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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Ben Ricchio's curator insight, February 11, 2015 11:43 AM

Special shoutout to "Revolution Foods" and "Teachers Pay Teachers"

Halina Ostańkowicz-Bazan's curator insight, February 12, 2015 11:31 AM

This is the MUST read text.

Helen Teague's curator insight, February 13, 2015 6:53 PM

A few surprises in this list

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Why Cyber Security Starts At Home

Why Cyber Security Starts At Home | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
Even the grandmas on Facebook need to know and practice basic security hygiene, because what happens anywhere on the Internet can eventually affect us all.

 

Learn more:

 

http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/11/04/how-can-education-help-to-lower-cybercrime/

 

http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2012/10/11/learning-basics-of-cyber-security-by-easy-to-follow-steps/

 

http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2012/11/29/cyber-hygiene-ict-hygiene-for-population-education-and-business/

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=A+Parent%27s+Guide+to+Cybersecurity

 

 
Via Gust MEES
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Cyber security is a joint venture for all of us involving all aspects of our lives. For students, this includes school and home. My experience was that School managers often decided they knew best.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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Social Media and the ‘Spiral of Silence’

Social Media and the ‘Spiral of Silence’ | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
Facebook, Twitter, and other platforms did not provide new outlets for the discussion of the Snowden-NSA revelations. People who thought their social media friends disagreed with them were less likely to discuss the issues in person and online.

 

Very interesting, a MUST READ!

 


Via Gust MEES
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Who is listening? That is the key question.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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Gust MEES's curator insight, September 18, 2014 10:49 AM

Very interesting, a MUST READ!


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Humanize Your eLearning Courses or Risk Losing Learners

Humanize Your eLearning Courses or Risk Losing Learners | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
eLearning is more efficient when the designer finds a way to personalize it for the learner.

Via k3hamilton, Jess Chalmers, Gust MEES
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The key might treating others humanely. It is important to see students with faces. It provides character and humanity to pedagogy.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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k3hamilton's curator insight, September 4, 2014 5:53 PM

sound advice- write like you speak

Gust MEES's curator insight, September 4, 2014 6:51 PM

eLearning is more efficient when the designer finds a way to personalize it for the learner.


Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Create, Innovate & Evaluate in Higher Education
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How Educators Around The World Are Implementing Mobile Learning (And What You Can Learn From Them) - InformED

How Educators Around The World Are Implementing Mobile Learning (And What You Can Learn From Them) - InformED | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
In less than a decade, mobile technology has spread to the furthest corners of the planet. Of the estimated 7 billion people on Earth, 6 billion now have

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Alfredo Corell
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

There are some interesting global ideas in the article.

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Enrica Ottone's curator insight, October 16, 2014 6:18 AM

In cerca di buone pratiche...

Ness Crouch's curator insight, April 6, 2015 9:52 PM

Education is constantly changing. How are you coping with mobile learning?

Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from educational implications
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Rote learning is bad – and other myths about education

Rote learning is bad – and other myths about education | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
The education system needs to produce 21st century learners, but what if we are going about achieving that in entirely the wrong way?

Via Sharrock
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I found two key points jumped out. First, myths are not always fictional. There is some truth, sometimes a lot, in a myth. With each succeeded generation, we have to figure out is what still makes sense in the story and what needs replacing. This leads to the second point which is that the present state of School is one of binaries and polarities. We are focused on either/or rather than the relational nature of what still works and what does not. Tradition is discarded in total and replaced with whatever the latest fad is.

 

We need more articles which make us think like heretics. The word heretic comes from the ancient Greek meaning "to be able to choose." Do we have choice to be able to choose?

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Sharrock's curator insight, July 16, 2014 3:12 PM

Be Careful: reading this may lead you to becoming a bandwagon heretic!

Gina Paschalidou's curator insight, July 17, 2014 1:58 AM

D. Christodoulou's '7 myths about education' book debunks common 21st century ideas about education.

The 7 myths are:

Facts prevent understanding.

Teacher-led instruction is passive.

The 21st century fundamentally changes everything.

You can always just look it up.

You should teach transferable skills.

Projects and activities are the best way to learn. 

Teaching knowledge is indoctrination. 

 

 

 

Mike Clare's curator insight, July 17, 2014 9:07 AM

This article is thought provoking,  what should we keep from the past and what new approaches should we embrace?  Makes for an interesting discussion.

Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
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3 Key Concepts That Will Help You Understand Learning in the Digital Age

3 Key Concepts That Will Help You Understand Learning in the Digital Age | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
These three "gogies" of effective online learning will help you get a clearer picture of learning and eLearning in the digital age.

 

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Heutagogy

 


Via Beth Dichter, SUSANA APARICIO, Gust MEES
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

These might work well with mature learners, but there is still a role for pedagogy. Another key point is are these really separate concepts or is it more likely they overlap along with pedagogy?

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Julie Lindsay's curator insight, September 1, 2014 7:03 AM

We need to be considering multi-pedagogical learning as a consequence of integrating technology with learning.

Raquel Oliveira's curator insight, December 1, 2014 7:09 AM

#avancee

3 conceitos sobre a aprendizagem do seculo XXI


1- HEUTA- encoraja os aprendizes a serem auto-direcionados

2- PEERA- foco em co-aprendizagem e co-criacao

3- CYBER- Encoraja engajamento dos aprendizes no ambiente de aprendizagem on line.

Ness Crouch's curator insight, April 22, 2015 8:25 PM

I like these ideas. 

Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Ιδέες εκπαίδευσης - Educational ideas
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What's In and What's Out in Education

What's In and What's Out in Education | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it

I really like what's in and what's out of current trends.  I created the following chart of what I hope and wish would be education ins and outs in the NEAR future.

 

Learn more:

 

http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2013/01/23/is-your-professional-development-up-to-date/

 

 


Via Gust MEES, Nicholas Fragkias
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Relationships are at the centre of education. It is no longer teacher-centred or learner-centred. In a sense, teachers and students are learning alongside each other. I am not sure it will always be the teacher leading the way although they have to be willing to know when to let go and when to take charge. Content is still incredibly important in that unless it connects to the lives of teachers and students it is not practical and meaningful. Technology is rarely seamlessly integrated.

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M Angus MacLean Hix's curator insight, May 2, 2014 4:52 PM

I'm really proud to be in a learning community where these "in" ideas are welcomed with creativity!

Odile Dupont's curator insight, May 6, 2014 3:19 AM

Des idées évidentes mais sans doute pas encore pour tout le monde !