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12 Myths that Lead to a Busy, Unfulfilling Life

12 Myths that Lead to a Busy, Unfulfilling Life | educational implications | Scoop.it
15 years ago, I quit law school to pursue one overarching question: “Why do capable people fail to break through to the next level?” The answer to the question, to my great surprise, is success. I
Sharrock's insight:
cognitive dissonance can rear its many heads in so many places in your lives. We need to face these questions and assertions with courage and honesty. Self awareness is very, very difficult to achieve.
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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, June 3, 2014 12:32 PM

The myths make sense. Three stood out. Myth #3 is a great one in School. I heard School managers suggest their individual fads du jour were based on everyone else doing it. If everyone jumped off the bridge, would we follow?

 

Myth #4 is important. As the one person who spoke up in staff meetings and questioned many of the proposed fads du jour, I was cast as a dissenter and non-team player. For example, my questioning the blind use of digital technologies was seen as opposing their use when I used digital technologies regularly in the classroom.

 

Myth #9 exists in School. I had a manager tell me one time I had to take on a new assignment over and above my existing assignment. When I responded that I would be taking other things off my plate, she was puzzled. I told her I had a life and only 24 hours in each day. That was not what she expected. This one goes with being the team player. The conversation led to me cutting back from 70-80 hour weeks to 50-60 hour work weeks.

 

What was interesting about these three myths was the school division had bought into The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People. The last habit was sharpening the saw and making time for one's self, which seemed to apply to some, but not all.

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Dissection of an Argument - Toolkit For Thinking

Dissection of an Argument - Toolkit For Thinking | educational implications | Scoop.it
Toolkit of ideas and techniques to help your creative and critical thinking including problem solving, logical fallacies and decision making.
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This resource may be of help for those in writing, education, and other fields where critical thinking is necessary for production and for producing value. Along with keeping rhetorical fallacies at hand. 

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Mindset | What is Mindset

Every so often a truly groundbreaking idea comes along. This is one. Mindset explains: Why brains and talent don’t bring success How they can stand in the way of it Why praising brains and talent doesn’t foster self-esteem and accomplishment, but jeopardizes them How teaching a simple idea about the brain raises grades and productivity What all great CEOs, parents, teachers, athletes know Mindset is a simple idea discovered by world-renowned Stanford University psychologist Carol Dweck in decades of research on achievement and success—a simple idea that makes all the difference. In a fixed mindset, people believe their basic qualities, like their intelligence or talent, are simply fixed traits. They spend their time documenting their intelligence or talent instead of developing them. They also believe that talent alone creates success—without effort. They’re wrong. In a growth mindset, people believe that their most basic abilities can be developed through dedication and hard work—brains and talent are just the starting point. This view creates a love of learning and a resilience that is essential for great accomplishment. Virtually all great people have had these qualities. Teaching a growth mindset creates motivation and productivity in the worlds of business, education, and sports. It enhances relationships. When you read Mindset, you’ll see how.
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Prosopagnosia Research - About Prosopagnosia

Prosopagnosia Research - About Prosopagnosia | educational implications | Scoop.it
What is prosopagnosia? Prosopagnosia (also known as 'face blindness') refers to a severe deficit in recognizing familiar people from their face. While some people report a very selective impairment that only influences the recognition of faces, others find the deficit extends to the recognition of other stimuli, such as objects, cars, or animals. Many people also report deficits in other aspects of face processing, such as judging age or gender, recognising certain emotional expressions, or following the direction of a person's eye gaze. Finally, a substantial proportion of prosopagnosics report navigational difficulties.
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The Interface of Language and Theory of Mind

The Interface of Language and Theory of Mind | educational implications | Scoop.it
The proposal is made that the interface between language and theory of mind is bidirectional. It seems probable that the conceptual developments of early Theory of Mind form an essential basis for helping to fix at least word reference. In development ...

 

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With respect to seeing and perceiving, verbs relating to these matters are common words for two and three year olds, and even in the blind child studied by Landau and Gleitman (1986), who translated sight words such as look,see into the haptic modality. There are other indices in language of a sensitivity to the perspective of another individual, in particular, deictic terms. Words such as I/you, here/there, this/that, come/go all share the property that they switch reference according to the speaker. Does use of these terms entail understanding another's mind? Minimally, they seem to require recognition that the terms align with the spatial position of speaker and listener, and in a dialogue, their meaning changes with the speaker. Use of deixis begins early, and experimentation suggests that children are quite adept by age three or four at using the terms appropriately in well-defined circumstances such as across a barrier that defines “here” and ‘there” in a particular way (de Villiers & de Villiers, 1974; Clark & Sengul, 1978). More subtle uses that relativize space to the domain of talk, such as “Here in my school” (Fillmore, 1957/1997) are undoubtedly later, but less is known about their development. Children with autism have notorious difficulty with deixis, especially pronouns (Tager-Flusberg, 2005), though deaf children do not (Pettito, 1987). Blind children understandably have problems with the spatial deictic terms (Andersen et al., 1993; Mulford, 1983).

The most telling cases may in fact be the third spatial deictic forms that occur in some languages like Spanish and Japanese, in which there is a form for “distal from both speaker and listener”, namely “yonder”. Miyamoto (p.c.) has suggested that use of this term more so than the ordinary deictics reflects an understanding of the listener's perspective, because the speaker has to judge not only what is far from himself, but what is far from both of them.

Returning to the words for sensory experience, we do not know when children appreciate the distinction betweenlook at and look for, and between see and look at. In addition we do not yet know at what age children understand the distinction between see and see that. Consider also related distinctions, such as the epistemic meaning of the modal must, e.g. “Daddy must be home” said because the child sees his bicycle on the porch. Acquisition evidence from Papafragou, (1998), Fond, (2003) and Heizmann (2006) found the epistemic “must” meaning emerging sometime around age 3.5-4.5 across several languages.

In terms of the directionality of the interface in this domain, it is generally assumed that the conceptual understanding precedes the linguistic mapping of the relevant forms, but there is no research that has correlated the two. We lack nonverbal tasks of the concepts, as well as careful linguistic work on the contrasts, done with the same children. Most importantly, we need work done with children who have language delay, to see if they are still on target developmentally with the concepts even when their associated language forms are delayed. Such work is missing at the moment for Theory of Mind accomplishments that emerge before the development of false belief.

  
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1.6 million Americans don’t have indoor plumbing. Here’s where they live

1.6 million Americans don’t have indoor plumbing. Here’s where they live | educational implications | Scoop.it
Don’t take your toilet for granted. Looking beyond the present day, it's worth remembering that indoor plumbing is a fairly new development for many communities. In 1950 fully one quarter of U.S. households did not have a flush toilet -- this means that the era of outhouses is well within living memory for many Americans. The town I live in, Oella, Md., was reliant on outhouses until 1984. And it's smack in the middle of the Acela corridor, between Baltimore and Washington.
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How Do We Recognize Faces?

How Do We Recognize Faces? | educational implications | Scoop.it
A new line of research investigates why some individuals are better at recognizing faces than others. The study expands on prior findings that have discovered we are better at recognizing faces from our own race than others. And, of course even within...
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recognizing faces may be cultural so are taught somehow.

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Autism – myth and reality | The Psychologist

Autism – myth and reality | The Psychologist | educational implications | Scoop.it

Although many people with autism have islands of relative or impressive strength – for example, superb maths skills or attention to detail – the reality  is that approximately .05 per cent of the autistic population has an extreme talent or genius-level gift (no one knows the precise figure, but this estimate is from the National Autistic Society). The idea that everyone with autism has a gift may seem like a positive misconception, but it can create difficulties for autistic people and their parents.

‘It can be really discouraging for parents of children who are less able,’ says Dr Liz Pellicano, an autism expert at the Institute of Education in London. ‘It can be damaging because there’s an immediate perception that their child must be good at something, and they might not be.’Allison Shefcyk agrees. She’s a research assistant at the University of Connecticut and was diagnosed with autism at age three. ‘We have interests and talents like many people,’ she says, ‘but to say that we are superior in any way, it’s like we’re trying to justify our existence alongside other people, as if  we have to keep up this myth, or nobody will want us.’

Sharrock's insight:

I have come across similar issues regarding other stereotypes. Some assume that Asians are talented in the maths and sciences, that black students can excel in some kinds of sports and/or arts, etc. When students don't live up to those "positive" stereotypes, the messages they receive (interpret) is that they aren't living up to a standard, that they are disappointments, failures of their races, or that they do not even belong to the race they identify with (although we are learning that "race" is a social construct). 

 

When students with autism aren't kind or supertalented in some domain, they are receiving similar messages.

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Solving Wicked Problems: Using Systems Thinking in Design

Solving Wicked Problems: Using Systems Thinking in Design | educational implications | Scoop.it

My classmates and I are in the Design for Social Innovation program because we identified problems in our communities, companies, or cultures and are keen to figure them out. But before talking about any solution or outcome, one must first frame the problem—by thoughtfully examining the system it’s part of to understand where and how to get involved.

 Learning to use systems thinking, a holistic approach to problem solving that emphasizes contextual understanding, has helped me with team management, project planning, creative work, and even relationships. And for wicked problems like healthcare that confront business, nature, and society, it’s proving to be imperative.So, where to even begin? “We have to invent boundaries for clarity and sanity,” advises systems thinking pioneer Donella Meadows. Sometimes a simple infographic works to tell the story. Designing visual maps and models helps us immediately find connections and describe relationships. Creating models helps in seeing the big picture and one's place within it.
Via Lauren Moss
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Martin (Marty) Smith's comment, January 28, 2013 7:14 PM
I think "design" and "programming" are rushing at each other at light speed. Web pages will be made from branching if,then,else algorithms soon. Can't just drip paint on a canvas, so design's function will be making those algorithms make visual sense.
Gordon Shupe's curator insight, February 8, 2013 6:38 AM

Info graphics don't really include digital photography, generally, but they are a fascinating way of displaying understanding, telling a story, and implying solutions.

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The Difference Between Skilled Learners and Good Students

The Difference Between Skilled Learners and Good Students | educational implications | Scoop.it
The skilled learners of the world don’t always excel in their studies. And I don’t mean Gates and Einstein.
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Finding the Most Creative Ways to Help Students Advance At Their Own Pace

Finding the Most Creative Ways to Help Students Advance At Their Own Pace | educational implications | Scoop.it
Despite a statewide competency-based learning policy, some New Hampshire high schools are focusing their energies on different kinds of innovation.
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Lions Quest -- Skills for Action: What Works Clearinghouse

Lions Quest -- Skills for Action: What Works Clearinghouse | educational implications | Scoop.it
Report SummaryEffectiveness

Skills for Action was found to have no discernible effects on students’ knowledge, attitudes, and values.

Program Description

Skills for Action, a program to build positive character values and life and citizenship skills for students in grades 9–12, includes classroom lessons and service learning. The program, with more than 100 lessons focused around 26 personal, social, and thinking skills, ranges from one semester to four years in length. Students explore personal stories highlighting values and behavior through teachers’ questions and group discussion and resource pages in the curricular materials. For service learning, students perform school-based or community-based projects and reflect on their experiences. Optional components include a student magazine, an Advisory Team, and supplemental units on drug use prevention. A related program is reviewed in the What Works Clearinghouse (WWC) intervention report on Skills for Adolescence.

Research

One study of Skills for Action met the WWC evidence standards with reservations. The study included almost 1,800 high school students in 26 classrooms from 25 rural, suburban, and urban schools in seven states in the eastern and central United States. The study authors examined results on students’ knowledge, attitudes, and values.

This intervention report was prepared for the WWC by American Institutes for Research under contract ED-02-CO-0022.
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Google Charts the History of Modern Music

Google Charts the History of Modern Music | educational implications | Scoop.it
Google recently began tracking its user's music uploads. What's it doing with that data? The overall shape of each major genre shows when it hit the scene and when it retreated — for example, R&B has a long history of resurgences, but Electronica is a strictly recent phenomenon. Delve into changes in the vocabulary used to name artists and their work — funk may be over as a genre, but as a band or album name it seems to be timeless. Or search for a particular artist to see the trajectory of their career — contrast U2's long-running reinvention and re-emergence from the '80s up to today, versus a one hit wonder like Los del Río's 1995 Macarena.
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19 high-paying jobs for people who don't like stress

19 high-paying jobs for people who don't like stress | educational implications | Scoop.it
Think there's no such thing as a high-paying, low-stress job? Think again.
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Choosing appropriate research methodologies

It is vital you pick approach research methodologies and methods for your thesis - your research after all is what your whole dissertation will rest on.

 
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Teaching Principles - Teaching Excellence & Educational Innovation - Carnegie Mellon University

Teaching Principles - Teaching Excellence & Educational Innovation - Carnegie Mellon University | educational implications | Scoop.it

Teaching is a complex, multifaceted activity, often requiring us as instructors to juggle multiple tasks and goals simultaneously and flexibly. The following small but powerful set of principles can make teaching both more effective and more efficient, by helping us create the conditions that support student learning and minimize the need for revising materials, content, and policies. While implementing these principles requires a commitment in time and effort, it often saves time and energy later on.

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Attention and consciousness - Scholarpedia

Attention and consciousness are two closely related psychological concepts that are often conflated, even among scholars. However,  modern psychological and neurophysiological researchers can now independently manipulate top-down selective attention and perceptual consciousness. This allows them to untangle the distinct contributions these two make to processing in the mind and their underlying neuronal mechanisms.  

Current controversies revolve around three questions

Can we become conscious of some object without attending to this object?  Can we attend to objects that are consciously suppressed, that is, invisible?Can top-down selective attention and perceptual consciousness have opposing effects?   

Although by no means conclusive, current evidence suggests that top-down attention and perceptual consciousness are two distinct but often allied processes with distinct neurobiological processes. As a consequence, it will be important to carefully distinguish the neuronal correlates of consciousness from the neuronal correlates of selective attention (Tse et al., 2005).

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The Influence of Language on Theory of Mind: A Training Study

The Influence of Language on Theory of Mind: A Training Study | educational implications | Scoop.it
This study investigated the role of language in the development of theory of mind. It was hypothesized that the acquisition of the syntactic and semantic properties of sentential complements would facilitate the development of a representational theory ...
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excerpt: "A number of different theoretical approaches have been proposed to explain the developments that take place in theory of mind at this stage, including nativist, conceptual change and simulation theories (e.g., Fodor, 1992;Gopnik, 1993; Gordon, 1996;Harris, 1992; Leslie & Roth, 1993; Perner, 1991; Russell, 1996; Wellman, 1990). Two main classes of theories have come to dominate the empirical literature: the ‘theory theory,’ which argues that at this stage children undergo fundamental conceptual changes in their understanding of mind (e.g., Gopnik, 1993;Perner, 1991; Wellman, 1990); and performance-based approaches which claim that developments in theory of mind are the results of other more general cognitive changes, rather than domain-specific conceptual change. Performance-based accounts divide into two groups: nativist modular theories, which claim that much younger children have a metarepresentational concept of belief, but are limited by other cognitive factors in their performance on false belief tasks (e.g., Fodor, 1992; Leslie & Roth, 1993); and executive function theories, which claim there are fundamental conceptual changes in theory of mind that take place at four, that are brought about by developments in executive processes such as working memory and inhibitory control (cf. Russell, 1996)."

 

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Why We Reach for Sugar When We're Stressed

Why We Reach for Sugar When We're Stressed | educational implications | Scoop.it
Those sweets have a uniquely calming effect on stress, according to new research.

 

"These experimental findings support a metabolic-brain-negative feedback pathway that is affected by sugar and may make some people under stress more hooked on sugar and possibly more vulnerable to obesity and its related conditions," the researchers write in their study, published earlier this month in the Journal of Clinical and Endocrinology and Metabolism.

 
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Meaning on the Brain: How Your Mind Organizes Reality | Guest Blog, Scientific American Blog Network

Meaning on the Brain: How Your Mind Organizes Reality | Guest Blog, Scientific American Blog Network | educational implications | Scoop.it
A research team led by Alex Huth showed volunteers hours of video footage of thousands of everyday objects and scenes – from cats and birds to cars and thunderstorms – as the subjects sat in an fMRI scanner. Then the researchers matched up the volunteers’ brain activity not only to each object they saw, but also to a whole tree of nested object categories: A taxonomy of the brain’s taxonomy. A vision of a “continuous semantic space,” where thousands of objects and actions are represented in terms of others.
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The Passion Economy | Digital Tonto

The Passion Economy | Digital Tonto | educational implications | Scoop.it
In a world of increasing complexity and diversity of skills, it’s becoming less tenable to get people to do what you want. They have to want what you want.
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A New learning model

A New learning model | educational implications | Scoop.it

We know that our mental models or models of how we see the world , are formed by our values, convictions, life experiences and that they influence greatly our learning capabilitie's.

Our learning is still driven by our lineair thinking:

We just look at our personal results, like to be teached or trained by experts, don't share our knowledge, want to have control of our own competencie's, think that the sum of competencies of individuals will give the competencie of the team.....

In my career, and listening to others I know that in our complex world we live in today ,and in the future ,it is not the case .

How we have to go to a "new learning style"?

1. Systems thinking:

It start in our minds and we have to realize that our world is systemic and that there is a causal relationship in all elements of the chosen system . We have to see , that the reality of events are driven by systems that are composed of elements (subsystems) in interdependence of each other and that the whole will give a emergent property that will be different as the sum of property's of his elements.

So will also the new learning system consist of interdependent elements which will form a reinforcement loop:

- Systems thinking skills

- Adapting mental models

- Communication

- Learning from others

- Personal development skills

2. Adapting mental models

All starts in our brains: by selecting elements of the environment we form our mental models.By seeing the whole instead of his elements, we can ask our self reflecting questions where the answers can open or reshape our mental models and seeing the reality more objective.

3.Communication

It's very important to communicate , what we have learned and share it with others.We have to learn as a team and to give as much possible feedback. What we have received as answer to our communication will again be filterd and change our mental model .

4. Learning inspired by others

It is important to remember that no one solution is unique. Learning from others is asking for taken a step back and free your ego . It give elements to refine your approach in new elements to enrich or change the mental model.

5. Development skills

By this type of learning you will improve your personal mastery, so can start to see the patterns in behavior which will explain the event , situation of problem. those generic patterns are called in systemsthinking archetypes, that are used to solve mny types of problems, and also interesting to use as a communication tool with others


Via Ides De Vos
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Genes Don't Cause Racial-Health Disparities, Society Does

Genes Don't Cause Racial-Health Disparities, Society Does | educational implications | Scoop.it
Researchers are looking in the wrong place: White people live longer not because of their DNA but because of inequality.
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“It has nothing to do with race, it has more to do with ancestry,” explained Rick Kittles, the director of the Center for Population Genetics at the University of Arizona and co-founder of African Ancestry, Inc. “We talk about ancestry, we talk about shared genetic backgrounds. That is a better proxy for biology than race. If someone says they’re of Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry, and they have a family history of Tay-Sachs, that’s not because of a race. That’s because of shared ancestry. If a person of West African descent has a family history of prostate cancer, that’s a shared genetic background.”
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Dodo bird verdict given new life by psychosis therapy study - PsyPost

Dodo bird verdict given new life by psychosis therapy study - PsyPost | educational implications | Scoop.it
A study by researchers at The University of Manchester and the University of Liverpool has examined the psychological treatment of more than 300 people suf ...
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"In this case, the research showed that it is the quality of the relationship between the therapist and patient which causes improvement and not the different techniques employed in the two therapies that were compared." (excerpt)
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New York City charters leave thousands of seats unfilled despite exploding demand, study finds

New York City charters leave thousands of seats unfilled despite exploding demand, study finds | educational implications | Scoop.it
The decision not to fill seats that are left vacant by departing students deprives other deserving students of places in the schools, the report argues. It also means that charter schools can appear to be improving, according to proficiency rates on standardized tests, even as the absolute number of children scoring proficient declines each year, it says.
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excerpt: "Charter school critics have long contended that charters’ refusal to backfill has given them an unfair leg up in comparisons with traditional schools because a steady influx of new students — who are often behind grade level — can hurt math and reading proficiency rates."

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Lead author Laurie Glezer says that once you’re a skilled reader, you don’t need to process the sounds of each letter in a word anymore, and that is “what allows for fast, efficient reading that li...

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Urban Sustainability and Resilience—Why We Need to Focus on Scales | The Nature of Cities

Urban Sustainability and Resilience—Why We Need to Focus on Scales | The Nature of Cities | educational implications | Scoop.it

via @almadakaj 

Two of the most debated and challenging concepts in urban development are sustainability and resilience. How are they related? Do they mean approximately the same thing or are they distinctly different and can misunderstandings lead to undesired outcomes?

 

In this essay I will try to clarify the concepts, discuss two common misinterpretations and reflect on the many difficulties that remain in application in urban development.

 
Sharrock's insight:

Understanding the main ideas in this article in terms of complex, adaptive systems, will help gain understandings in terms of education. 

 

There are some issues with education as business (model). Many businesses seek sustainability and efficiency by cutting redundancy. Education in schools seek redundancy by learning concepts in different ways, from different frameworks, and relearning over time. 

In her article, “Will Your Skills be Redundant in the Machine Age?”, Alma Dasaj, a management consultant, tells a story about how she learned from not putting redundancy to work for her. She had gotten lost because she had depended on one mobile device to provide her with directions to where she needed to go. This had become a problem because when her plane landed in the foreign country, she discovered that the device needed to be recharged. She learned from this experience, but says, “There's always a trade-off between Redundancy and Efficiency.”  She also said, “Redundancy is a time-tested approach to Resilience, but it may conflict with Sustainability goals in complex systems or organizations and even lead to inefficiency, structural rigidity and, paradoxically, less safety. Redundancy is not Variety or Symmetry and in many systems (organizations) that we create these different terms/concepts are often mistakenly used as synonyms.”
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