educational implications
3.8K views | +0 today
Follow
 
Scooped by Sharrock
onto educational implications
Scoop.it!

New Florida Writing Test Will Use Computers To Grade Student Essays

New Florida Writing Test Will Use Computers To Grade Student Essays | educational implications | Scoop.it

A computer program will grade student essays on the writing portion of the standardized test set to replace the FCAT, according to bid documents released by the Florida Department of Education.

The essays will be scored by a human and a computer, but the computer score will only matter if the score is significantly different

Sharrock's insight:

excerpt: "Shermis found computer programs — including AIR’s AutoScore– performed at least as well as human grading in two of three trials that have been conducted. His research concluded computers were reliable enough to be used as a second reviewer for high stakes tests."


This could generate some powerful data but I need a better understanding of what the program is assessing and would like to see the rubric the humans are using for scoring. Shermis' paper on the research is provided at the bottom of the webpage though. I just have to read it.

more...
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, March 25, 2014 1:17 PM

This is another way to subvert teaching as a truly human activity. It is a way of checking up on flawed humans.

educational implications
Theory and technology with possible impacts on how we learn
Curated by Sharrock
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Dissection of an Argument - Toolkit For Thinking

Dissection of an Argument - Toolkit For Thinking | educational implications | Scoop.it
Toolkit of ideas and techniques to help your creative and critical thinking including problem solving, logical fallacies and decision making.
Sharrock's insight:

This resource may be of help for those in writing, education, and other fields where critical thinking is necessary for production and for producing value. Along with keeping rhetorical fallacies at hand. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Maladaptive Daydreaming — What Is It?

Maladaptive Daydreaming — What Is It? | educational implications | Scoop.it
There are not any conclusive symptoms of MD, since it's not an official diagnosis, but in view of the research available, there are a few signs that be related to MD:

1. Daydreaming excessively in a way that is often compared to an addiction.

2. This excessive daydreaming often begins in childhood.

3. Books, movies, music, video games, and other media may be a daydreaming trigger.

4. The daydreaming itself is often detailed and elaborate, sometimes compared to a movie or novel.

[Related: Do Women Have Wet Dreams Too?]

5. Repetitive movements while daydreaming are common (but not always present in sufferers) — pacing, rocking, spinning, shaking something in their hand, etc.

6. They may sometimes talk, laugh, cry, gesture, or make facial expressions as they daydream. People suffering from this know the difference between daydreaming and reality, and do not confuse the two; this makes them distinctly different from psychotics or schizophrenics.

7. Some people will lie in bed for hours daydreaming, and may either have difficulty going to sleep because of this, or have difficulty getting out of bed once awake. They may also neglect basic functions such as regular meals, showering, and other daily activities because of their daydreaming.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

The 1% rule explains why a few people end up with most of the rewards

The 1% rule explains why a few people end up with most of the rewards | educational implications | Scoop.it
The Pareto principle
At the time, Pareto was studying wealth in various nations. As he was Italian, he began by analyzing the distribution of wealth in Italy. To his surprise, he discovered that approximately 80 percent of the land in Italy was owned by just 20 percent of the people. Similar to the pea pods in his garden, most of the resources were controlled by a minority of the players.

Pareto continued his analysis in other nations and a pattern began to emerge. For instance, after poring through the British income tax records, he noticed that approximately 30 percent of the population in Great Britain earned about 70 percent of the total income.

As he continued researching, Pareto found that the numbers were never quite the same, but the trend was remarkably consistent. The majority of rewards always seemed to accrue to a small percentage of people. This idea that a small number of things account for the majority of the results became known as the Pareto Principle or, more commonly, the 80/20 Rule.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

We Need To Figure Things Out For Ourselves

We Need To Figure Things Out For Ourselves | educational implications | Scoop.it
If we don’t try to think more like investigative reporters, we’re at risk of tyranny, argues a historian who has studied fascism, Nazism, and communism.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Doctors flunk quiz on screening-test math

Doctors flunk quiz on screening-test math | educational implications | Scoop.it
Many doctors, and the news media, don’t understand that because of the statistics of screening tests, a test with 90 percent accuracy can give a wrong diagnosis more than 90 percent of the time.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Just Like Burnout at Work, It’s Possible to Burn Out on Parenting

Just Like Burnout at Work, It’s Possible to Burn Out on Parenting | educational implications | Scoop.it

Interestingly, it turns out there are a lot of similarities between parental and professional burnout, and not just in the sense that parents face the same overwhelming despair as overworked interns. Since the mid-20th century, researchers have been documenting the many social and cultural changes that have contributed to the rise in professional burnout. Jobs that were once simply considered trades, for example, are now often idealized as “callings.” People are working longer hours than they used to, and many feel less supported by company resources (such as personnel and equipment). Over the past several decades, this combination of factors has created a perfect storm for a wave of frustration and, eventually, burnout, often defined in academic literature as a combination of exhaustion, inefficacy (feeling less productive and competent), and depersonalization (feeling emotional withdrawal from your work and the people around you).

Sharrock's insight:
Consider the possible impact of parenting burnout on children and their mental health. 
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

How to Apply a Scientific Mindset to Your Everyday Life

How to Apply a Scientific Mindset to Your Everyday Life | educational implications | Scoop.it
The scientific mindset is a great way to better understand the world and how to adapt to it. This mindset is not only useful in colleges and laboratories, but also in our everyday lives.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

What Does It Mean to Be Trauma Informed?

What Does It Mean to Be Trauma Informed? | educational implications | Scoop.it
Aaryn Landers Lamb discusses what it means to be trauma informed and how attorneys can use trauma-informed practices to serve children in foster care.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Watch now: WITF | Keystone Crossroads: Education Equity | WITF Video

Watch now: WITF | Keystone Crossroads: Education Equity       | WITF Video | educational implications | Scoop.it

Every child in Pennsylvania is offered an education through their local school district, but not every district is able to provide the same opportunities. A lot depends on the where the student lives.
Watch online: Keystone Crossroads: Education Equity from WITF. On demand, streaming video from WITF
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Humility: The Acceptance of Our Flawed Self

Humility: The Acceptance of Our Flawed Self | educational implications | Scoop.it
What Humility Teaches Us

“I am not perfect.” – I’m not perfect, I’ve made mistakes in the past and I will make mistakes in the future. There will always be some things I want to change about myself. I’m a never-ending project.
“I don’t know everything.” – I’m not as smart as I think I am. I often overestimate how much I know about a particular subject, and it’s important for me to accept the wisdom of ignorance.

“My feelings don’t always serve me.” – When I accept my “flawed self,” I accept that sometimes I need to fight against my natural desires and impulses when they don’t serve my best interests. My emotions can sometimes misguide me.

“I accept my weaknesses.” – Like everyone else, I have both strengths and weaknesses. By ignoring my weaknesses, I only make myself more susceptible to give into them and repeat them. I need to accept my weaknesses before I can begin working on them.



“It’s okay to seek help outside myself.” – When I accept my flaws and limitations, I recognize that sometimes I need to seek help outside of myself to get past difficult times in my life. I shouldn’t feel ashamed when I need to ask other people for help or assistance.

“I don’t need to prove myself all the time.” – When I cultivate humility, I’m less motivated to “prove myself” to others all the time. Instead I’m comfortable accepting my flaws and weaknesses, because I understand they are part of being human.

“I play a small role in a much bigger picture.” – Life is bigger than just “me.” My life is a product of many years of evolution, culture, relationships, and tradition. To live my life fully means I acknowledge that I play a small role in a much bigger picture.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Algebra II Drives Dropout Rates and Is Mostly Useless. Here’s a Plan for Getting Rid of It.

Algebra II Drives Dropout Rates and Is Mostly Useless. Here’s a Plan for Getting Rid of It. | educational implications | Scoop.it
After Hacker previewed the ideas in The Math Myth in a 2012 New York Times op-ed, the Internet lit up with responses accusing him of anti-intellectualism. At book length, it’s harder to dismiss his ideas. He has a deep respect for what he calls the “truth and beauty” of math; his discussion of the discovery and immutability of pi taught me more about the meaning of 3.14 than any class I’ve ever taken. He’s careful to address almost every counterargument a math traditionalist could throw at him. For example, he writes that students will probably learn little about concepts of proof that are relevant to their lives, such as legal proof, by studying abstract math proofs; they’d be better served by spending time studying how juries consider reasonable doubt. More controversially, he points out that many of the nations with excellent math performance, such as China, Russia, and North Korea, are repressive. “So what can we conclude about mathematics, when its brand of brilliance can thrive amid onerous oppression?” he writes. “One response may be that the subject, by its very nature, is so aloof from political and social reality that its discoveries give rulers no causes for concern. If mathematics had the power to move minds toward controversial terrain, it would be viewed as a threat by wary states.”
Sharrock's insight:
Reject dogma by considering these thoughts.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

The Blueberry Story: The teacher gives the businessman a lesson | Announce | University of Nebraska-Lincoln

The Blueberry Story: The teacher gives the businessman a lesson | Announce | University of Nebraska-Lincoln | educational implications | Scoop.it
I was convinced of two things. First, public schools needed to change; they were archaic selecting and sorting mechanisms designed for the industrial age and out of step with the needs of our emerging "knowledge society." Second, educators were a major part of the problem: they resisted change, hunkered down in their feathered nests, protected by tenure, and shielded by a bureaucratic monopoly. They needed to look to business. We knew how to produce quality. Zero defects! TQM! Continuous improvement!

In retrospect, the speech was perfectly balanced - equal parts ignorance and arrogance.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Autistic behavior makes perfect sense

Autistic behavior makes perfect sense | educational implications | Scoop.it
People with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) have difficulties smoothly and consistently processing information. Information from the senses about the properties of things,  language information, information about the social world, emotional information, and also information from the body and self and what is going on there.  People with autism especially have difficulty with understanding the big picture, putting all the pieces of information together so that it hangs together and makes sense. They get the bits of information, but the bits do not cohere. They cannot put the bits in order. They also have especially difficulty processing new information, and do much better with using what is already known.  They have trouble understanding context and how each element in a complex bit of information is at least partially defined by the whole context. They have trouble with relative thinking.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sharrock from Effective Technology Integration into Education
Scoop.it!

5 robots that are about to revolutionize the workforce — and put jobs at risk

5 robots that are about to revolutionize the workforce — and put jobs at risk | educational implications | Scoop.it

According to a study from Oxford University and the Oxford Martin School, 47% of jobs in the United States are "at risk" of becoming "automated in the next 20 years." PwC has similar findings, estimating that 38% of U.S. jobs are at risk of being replaced by robots and artificial intelligence in the next 15 years. And while two-thirds of Americans believe robots will take over most of the workforce in the next 50 years, they're also in denial: 80% say their job will "probably" or "definitely" be around in five decades. 


 Here are five robots that are coming to take some jobs from unsuspecting humans:

 

Via Marc Wachtfogel, Ph.D., Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
more...
Pauline Farrell's curator insight, April 25, 6:16 AM
Share your insight
Rescooped by Sharrock from iPads, MakerEd and More in Education
Scoop.it!

The skills your kids should cultivate to be competitive in the age of automation - Quartz

The skills your kids should cultivate to be competitive in the age of automation - Quartz | educational implications | Scoop.it
We’re all getting used to the thought that in a not-so-distant future, competition for jobs won’t just be other humans, it will also be an intelligent robot, self-driving car, or other artificial agent. But in our gut, we know this can’t be the full truth, that there’s a more nuanced story. We at least believe that elite human skills will remain valuable even as automation eats the world. The hard part is figuring out which ones will be the most valuable and where they will be the most prized.

Via John Evans
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Risk literacy: Gerd Gigerenzer at TEDxZurich

In this world, nothing is certain except death and taxes. We learn to read and write but not how to deal with uncertainty: we are risk illiterates. Why d
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Anti-disciplinary Ideas: Pattie Maes on new ideas and new devices - thinkLeaders

Anti-disciplinary Ideas: Pattie Maes on new ideas and new devices - thinkLeaders | educational implications | Scoop.it
Professor Pattie Maes founded the Fluid Interfaces research group at MIT’s Media Lab, where she has worked for over 25 years. thinkLeaders Innovation Anti-disciplinary Ideas: Pattie Maes on new ideas and new devices March 21, 2017 | Written by: Marie Glenn Categorized: Innovation | Pacesetters Professor Pattie Maes founded the Fluid Interfaces research group at MIT’s Media Lab, where she has worked for over 25 years. Maes’s passion has long been to make technology easier to use by making its capabilities more natural, intuitive and mobile. Her 2009 TED talk, “Sixth Sense,” which describes what those innovations might look like, is among the most-watched TED talks ever. An internationally-recognized thinker and innovator, Fast Company named Maes one of its “50 most influential designers.” Newsweek called her one of the “100 Americans to watch for” and the World Economic Forum describes her as a “Global Leader for Tomorrow.” We caught up with Maes to ask her what’s next in the area of human-to-computer interaction. Why did you start the Fluid Interfaces group and what do you hope to do? Our phones and tablets are like our secondary brains. We can hardly function without them. Yet, in many respects our relationship with our devices hasn’t really evolved all that much. Most of the time the way we interact with them is with two thumbs and a tiny screen. We still have to punch in information and tell our devices what to do. Our devices are not aware of our context, what our interests are and what we are trying to do. We can be looking at a box of cereal, but our devices can’t tell us whether it lines up with our dietary interests, if it has the right amount of fiber or too much sugar. We have to find that information out for ourselves. I started the Fluid Interfaces group to explore how we can create a more seamless relationship between our biological brains and our digital brains, through our devices and the services they run. If I get an email from someone, the system should tell me about other emails that are about the same topic or task. We’re looking at ways to help systems become more adept at intuiting the context and goals of our interactions and offer relevant information and assistance proactively. Why is that seamlessness so important? Right now we are living in two worlds, the physical and the digital, and it’s clunky and inefficient, both in terms of time lost and in the ability to sustain concentration without having to stop and start to find needed information, notate a finding or other interruption. Such constant task-switching is costly, especially if you consider how many times we do it over the course of a day. We want to design and develop computer interfaces that are a more natural extension of our minds, bodies and behaviors. To that end, we’re studying ways to make digital devices work in greater symbiosis with the user and to better integrate our two worlds. What research are you personally most excited about? I think smart, wearable technologies have the potential to reshape learning. If you think about it, our phones and personal devices are with us all the time—and increasingly over the entire span of our lives. Given all the data and interactions these devices manage, they are in a unique position to know what we know and what we don’t know. Those interactions can provide a basis for building really personalized learning systems. For example, one that we’re working on right now is a device-based second language learning system called WordSense that recognizes objects as the user moves about their day and labels those objects in the language the student is trying to learn. The device can also track and test the user’s language acquisition, skipping over words and phrases they’ve already mastered and reinforcing other concepts depending on their progress. By fusing together the process of acquiring knowledge and applying it—by having it occur in the field and experientially, we think learning and training can become more relevant, fun and effective. What are some of the novel form factors that you’re developing? One of my students is working on a system that monitors physiological information, from heart rate to EEG data, to allow people to recognize when they’re becoming anxious and to discover what types of behaviors have a calming effect on them. Another student has developed a type of tattoo ink that changes color depending on an individual’s glucose level. It’s wild to imagine that a tattoo—and not a device—could become a visual display, and this one is literally part of your body. My colleague, Neri Oxman, is fashioning materials that are inspired by biology to create clothing that better conforms to our bodies, designs that look to the natural world for how best to accommodate things like our bony knees and elbows, for instance, and for insights on when to use harder materials versus softer ones. Most innovation labs are dominated by traditional computer science disciplines. Not so yours. Why the focus on interdisciplinarity? I would say that we are not so much interdisciplinary as we are anti-disciplinary. It’s easier to come up with truly new ideas when you have many different perspectives in the mix. We have people at the lab who are trained as musicians and composers.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

As soon as they can read, children trust text instructions over spoken information

As soon as they can read, children trust text instructions over spoken information | educational implications | Scoop.it
Corriveau's team said their results showed that once children learn to read, "they rapidly come to regard the written word as a particularly authoritative source of information about how to act in the world." They added that in some ways this result is difficult to explain. Young readers are exposed to a good deal of fantasy and fiction in written form, so why should they be so trusting of written instruction? Perhaps they are used to seeing adults act on the basis of written information - such as maps, menus, and recipes - but then again, pre-readers will also have had such experiences. This suggests there's something special about the process of learning to read that leads children to perceive written instruction as authoritative.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

What Does It Mean to Be Trauma Informed?

What Does It Mean to Be Trauma Informed? | educational implications | Scoop.it
Aaryn Landers Lamb discusses what it means to be trauma informed and how attorneys can use trauma-informed practices to serve children in foster care.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Let’s Add Some Nuance to the ‘Two Americas’ Narrative

Let’s Add Some Nuance to the ‘Two Americas’ Narrative | educational implications | Scoop.it
Challenging the “Two Americas” narrative by looking at individual metrics can help us see people in every state along the spectrum of each well-being metric. Groups of people that aren’t lumped together in the typical binaries often have overlapping concerns in their daily experiences, and they can come together to think through strategies to better their situations. This perspective is obviously not going to solve everything, but recognizing the nuance is a good first step.

Sharrock's insight:
Share your insight
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

AI, machine learning blossom in agriculture and pest control

AI, machine learning blossom in agriculture and pest control | educational implications | Scoop.it

Some of the company's 5,000 pest control technicians are using an Android mobile app developed by Accenture to identify bugs. A technician stumped by a type of bug or rodent can take a picture of the pest and run the app, called PestID. The picture calls home to Google’s image classification and machine learning software to sift through a number of pest images and identify the intruder, according to Nisha Sharma, a managing director in Accenture's mobility group.

Sharrock's insight:
This article suggests that farmers are acquiring the equivalents of data scientists and expert biologists using drones, android handheld mobile apps, and Internet Computer technology services. The implications should be explored. For one thing, knowing that one or two product/services are in use now should suggest that there will be competitors in this field coming along very soon. This information can be scary but may also encourage student to study special interests but to encourage skills in engineering and computer technologies as well as statistics with the goal of becoming competitive.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

The Secret to Creativity, Intelligence & Scientific Thinking | Buffer

The Secret to Creativity, Intelligence & Scientific Thinking | Buffer | educational implications | Scoop.it
Understand the science of how creativity and intelligence and knowledge are all linked together & learn how to be more creative today by making connections:
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Freelancers Give Advice On How To Screen Clients | Fast Company | The Future Of Business

Freelancers Give Advice On How To Screen Clients | Fast Company | The Future Of Business | educational implications | Scoop.it

"Freelancers don’t just have to take work because it’s in front of them,” says Paul Jarvis, a freelance web designer-turned-founder of The Creative Class, which educates other freelancers. “They can screen and evaluate clients to see if it’s the type of work they want to be known for and the client understands and values their expertise.”

Sharrock's insight:
These work-related questions are also education-related questions. School work and learning is knowledge work just as teaching is knowledge work. We can discover insights when looking at educating students through the lens of work. 

In the freelance world of business, the human capital question comes to focus around the screening of clients. Does the prospective client understand and value the freelancer's expertise? Is the kind of work the client is requesting good for your brand? 
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Autism: Making sense of a confusing world

Autism: Making sense of a confusing world | educational implications | Scoop.it

Autism Spectrum Disorder is a neurological condition that causes developmental disability. It affects the way the brain functions and results in difficulties with communication and social interaction. People with the disorder also exhibit unusual patterns of behaviour, activities and interests.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

What is an Invisible Disability? - Invisible Disabilities Association - IDA

What is an Invisible Disability? - Invisible Disabilities Association - IDA | educational implications | Scoop.it
In general, the term disability is often used to describe an ongoing physical challenge. This could be a bump in life that can be well managed or a mountain that creates serious changes and loss. Either way, this term should not be used to describe a person as weaker or lesser than anyone else! Every person has a purpose, special uniqueness and value, no matter …
more...
No comment yet.