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5 Principles of Creativity

5 Principles of Creativity | educational implications | Scoop.it
Creative geniuses tend to be less the ones with the quickest answers and more the ones who keep working till they get it right.
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Creativity comes from years of work in your given field while also learning a bout other fields (one or more fields beyone your own expertise). This article is important for educators and people who are looking for more creativity added to education.

 

Don't expect students to create meaningful changes to a given field. from the article: "This paper details a wealth of research that suggests that creativity comes only after years of preparation.  Harvard’s Howard Gardner reported similar results in his study chronicling seven of histories greatest geniuses, Creating Minds."

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, June 10, 2013 6:40 PM

This is a good article with five good points which add to the other articles I have scooped.

educational implications
Theory and technology with possible impacts on how we learn
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Dissection of an Argument - Toolkit For Thinking

Dissection of an Argument - Toolkit For Thinking | educational implications | Scoop.it
Toolkit of ideas and techniques to help your creative and critical thinking including problem solving, logical fallacies and decision making.
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This resource may be of help for those in writing, education, and other fields where critical thinking is necessary for production and for producing value. Along with keeping rhetorical fallacies at hand. 

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When Virtual Reality Meets Education - TechCrunch

When Virtual Reality Meets Education - TechCrunch | educational implications | Scoop.it

Educators and students alike are seeking an ever-expanding immersive landscape, where students engage with teachers and each other in transformative experiences through a wide spectrum of interactive resources. In this educational reality, VR has a definitive place of value.


Via Nik Peachey, John Evans
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Viljenka Savli (http://www2.arnes.si/~sopvsavl/)'s curator insight, January 27, 9:50 AM

A very good article that focuses on new possibility of VR use cross classrooms and countries. 

VR platform offerings could result in a curator or artist guiding a group of thousands around a museum exhibition or cultural site, or an actor or professor leading a virtual master class in real time with students from all over the world.

 

VR platform offerings could result in a curator or artist guiding a group of thousands around a museum exhibition or cultural site, or an actor or professor leading a virtual master class in real time with students from all over the world.

Tony Guzman's curator insight, January 28, 12:02 PM

This article shares how virtual reality is slowly showing up in education. Are we ready for this disruption?

Linda Buckmaster's curator insight, February 3, 1:38 PM

While statistics on VR use in K-­12 schools and colleges have yet to be gathered, the steady growth of the market is reflected in the surge of companies solely dedicated to providing schools with packaged educational curriculum, content, teacher training and technological tools to support VR­-based instruction in the classroom.

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Lessons Learned -- Why the Failure of Systems Thinking Should Inform the Future of Design Thinking

Lessons Learned -- Why the Failure of Systems Thinking Should Inform the Future of Design Thinking | educational implications | Scoop.it
"You never learn by doing something right cause you already know how to do it. You only learn from making mistakes and correcting them.&quot...
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excerpt: "In addition to engaging a much larger community in knowledge-sharing, such an approach will provide the users of design thinking with "trial-size" access to a growing body of knowledge. One wouldn't have to buy the whole of "design thinking", for example, to accept that there are places in management where sketching could help out, or that for a large class of problems spending more time on problem framing and reframing will pay dividends down the line. In time, each manager will do what we have learned designers do, adopt those methods, techniques and ideas that best suit their own personal style and the nature of the problems that they typically encounter. In the end then, rather than learning and subscribing to a theory or system of thought that is based on ideas from design, managers and policy makers will become designers of a sort particularly suited to their circumstances."

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Daniel Tammet: Different ways of knowing

Daniel Tammet has linguistic, numerical and visual synesthesia -- meaning that his perception of words, numbers and colors are woven together into a new way of perceiving and understanding the world. The author of "Born on a Blue Day," Tammet shares his art and his passion for languages in this glimpse into his beautiful mind.

 


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Kenneth Mikkelsen's curator insight, July 18, 2015 7:10 PM

Wonderful talk by Daniel Tammet. Watch it to understand how different kinds of perceiving create different kinds of knowing and understanding.

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Evolutionary biologists have analyzed political opposition to evolution and found it has evolved

Evolutionary biologists have analyzed political opposition to evolution and found it has evolved | educational implications | Scoop.it
Organized opposition to the teaching of evolution in public schools in the United States began in the 1920s, leading to the famous Scopes Monkey trial. It continues today, but has evolved significantly from the outright bans.
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Here's How You Can Learn Practically Anything

Here's How You Can Learn Practically Anything | educational implications | Scoop.it
Learning a skill requires you to go through four key stages, but beware of the middle two.
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The Problem with Female Superheroes

The Problem with Female Superheroes | educational implications | Scoop.it
From helpless damsel to powerful heroine, but still hypersexualized
Sharrock's insight:
"while the roles for women in superhero movies have evolved from the helpless, easy mark to the commanding, mighty protector, the central appeal of these characters as sexual goddesses is the same.  As a consequence, the superheroines, like their victim counterparts, are undermining rather than improving women’s perceptions of their own bodies and physical competence.  And they are doing nothing to improve beliefs about women’s roles in society." (Excerpt)
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Why Understanding Student Trauma is More Important Than Teaching ‘Grit’

Why Understanding Student Trauma is More Important Than Teaching ‘Grit’ | educational implications | Scoop.it
“We are asking students to change a belief system without changing the situation around them.” "The transformative potential in growth mindsets and social-emotional skills such as grit may be more applicable to students whose basic needs are already met. When asking the question of why some children succeed in school and others don’t, he said the educators and administrators tend to overestimate the power of the person and underestimate the power of the situation." (Excerpt)
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Researchers wrestle with co-authorship

Researchers wrestle with co-authorship | educational implications | Scoop.it
The prickly topic of how to assign credit to scientists flares up on social media.
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The Third Wave

Rise of the Prosumer
This began in the early 1970's with the introduction of the do-it-yourself pregnancy kit.
Rapidly growing movement -- "millions of people... are beginning to perform for themselves services hitherto performed for them by doctors... what these people are really doing is shifting some production from Sector B [the "visible economy"] to Sector A [the "invisible economy"]" (267).
The self-help movement is another facet of this trend.
Other examples of this trend are long-distance direct- dialing, self-service fuel pumps, electronic banking, self-service supermarkets, discount stores.
More and more thins are sold knocked down, ready for "easy assembly" at home.
Appliances, like refrigerators, are starting to come with 1-800 numbers to call for repairs--they walk YOU through the repair process.
The do-it-yourself industry is experiencing explosive growth.
All the above demonstrates the "LAW OF RELATIVE INEFFICIENCY." "This holds that the more we automate the production of goods and lower their per-unit cost, the more we increase the relative cost of handcrafts and nonautomated services" (273).
"For such reasons, we must expect the price of many services to continue their sky-rocketing climb in the years ahead... [this will] make it increasingly 'profitable' for people to produce for their own consumption" (273).
This suggests a future economy in which "leisure time" is redefined as "unpaid work;" people will never hold a full-time job, but spend extensive time "producing" their own goods and services with immensely enhanced self-help technologies.
Instead of buying a shirt, you will make your own with a "smart" electronic sewing machine.
You will purchase a new car by purchasing a "kit" and building it yourself.
"What is the real meaning of unemployment? Is a laid-off auto worker who puts a new roof on his house, or overhauls his car, unemployed in the same sense as one who sits idly at home watching football on television?" (282).
"Battles will flare over which needs will be met by which sector of the economy. Struggles will sharpen, for example, over licensing, building codes, and the like, as Second Wave forces attempt to hold on to jobs and profits by preventing prosumers from moving in... " (283).
Teachers' unions typically fight to keep parents out of the classroom... [but] a number of educational problems cannot be resolved without the parent" (283).
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English Manners Are Downright Medieval ('Sorry!' Was That Rude?)

English Manners Are Downright Medieval ('Sorry!' Was That Rude?) | educational implications | Scoop.it
When I talk about [the doctrine of etiquette taking the marrow out of manners], I'm really talking about fundamental principles to do with sensitivity to others, respect for other people and their space, their belongings, and it just seems to me that the moment etiquette becomes the centerpiece of the agenda, manners and morality are essentially divorced. And I suppose I'd like to put the morality back at the center of the discussion of manners.
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Children Raised in Religious Households May Be More Selfish

Children Raised in Religious Households May Be More Selfish | educational implications | Scoop.it
Some religious people say religion is what makes people moral. Studies show that religious people are more likely to be civically engaged, make ethical dec
Sharrock's insight:
The comments and other responses to this study will be interesting... "The researchers found no difference in generosity between the children raised Christian and those raised Muslim. (There weren’t enough children of other faiths for a statistical comparison.)"
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The Future of Utilities Looks Uncertain | MIT Technology Review

The Future of Utilities Looks Uncertain | MIT Technology Review | educational implications | Scoop.it
Troubled power companies are adapting, slowly, to the transformations roiling their businesses.
Sharrock's insight:
"Many companies, such as the largely coal-based utilities of the Midwest, have chosen resistance and litigation as they attempt to hold off dramatic change. Others are still studying the issue while trying to milk their existing (again, largely fossil-fuel-based) plants as long as possible. Others, spying an opportunity to be leaders in the emerging energy economy, are trying to transform their businesses as rapidly as possible. The irony of the San Diego clash is that San Diego Gas & Electric is squarely in the latter camp. The company says it now has 64,000 customers producing their own power from solar arrays, representing more than 450 megawatts—the capacity of a good-sized conventional power plant. Saying it is committed to enabling the spread of rooftop solar, the company recently introduced a “Renewable Meter Adapter,” a device that quickly connects solar panels to the home’s electric meter, avoiding the need for costly upgrades. The new devices “will help to put solar within the reach of more of our customers in a way that is efficient, safe, and reliable,” Caroline Winn, the utility’s chief energy delivery officer, said in a statement. Critics, who include the Sierra Club, quickly pointed out that the adapters cost $1,300 apiece." (Excerpt)
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Stand Up and Be Counted: Why social science should stop using the qualitative/quantitative dichotomy

Stand Up and Be Counted: Why social science should stop using the qualitative/quantitative dichotomy | educational implications | Scoop.it
Qualitative and quantitative research methods have long been asserted as distinctly separate, but to what end? Howard Aldrich argues the simple dichotomy fails to account for the breadth of collect...

Via Dr Derek Jones
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Dr Derek Jones's curator insight, November 30, 2015 7:54 AM

Over recent years I have delivered my opinions to various audiences about simplistic distinctions between qualitative and quantitative research - this piece captures nicely (and much better) some of my issues.

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Read This If You Just Need Someone To Give You A Chance At Your Dream Job

Read This If You Just Need Someone To Give You A Chance At Your Dream Job | educational implications | Scoop.it
There’s something for you. It’s right around you. “A ship lost at sea for many days suddenly sighted a friendly vessel. From the mast of the unfortunate vessel was seen a signal: “Water, water. We die of thirst.” The answer from the friendly vessel at once came back: “Cast down your bucket where you are.” A second time, the signal, “Water, send us water!” went up from the distressed vessel. And was answered: “Cast down your bucket where you are.” A third and fourth signal for water was answered: “Cast down your bucket where you are.” The captain of the distressed vessel, at last heeding the injunction, cast down his bucket and it came up full of fresh, sparkling water from the mouth of the Amazon River.”
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Late Bloomers

Late Bloomers | educational implications | Scoop.it
Doing something truly creative, we’re inclined to think, requires the exuberance and energy of youth. Malcolm Gladwell questions whether this popular assumption is true.
Sharrock's insight:
"...then there was Alfred Hitchcock, who made “Dial M for Murder,” “Rear Window,” “To Catch a Thief,” “The Trouble with Harry,” “Vertigo,” “North by Northwest,” and “Psycho”—one of the greatest runs by a director in history—between his fifty-fourth and sixty-first birthdays. Mark Twain published “Adventures of Huckleberry Finn” at forty-nine. Daniel Defoe wrote “Robinson Crusoe” at fifty-eight." (Excerpt)
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Speaking of Psychology: Understanding your racial biases

Speaking of Psychology: Understanding your racial biases | educational implications | Scoop.it
Understanding the way people feel about and behave toward those outside their own group can help communities heal after a tragedy, as well as prevent future ones.
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Librarians in uproar after borrowing record of Haruki Murakami is leaked

Librarians in uproar after borrowing record of Haruki Murakami is leaked | educational implications | Scoop.it
Books the celebrated Japanese author borrowed from a library in Kobe when he was a schoolboy have been revealed by a newspaper. "While some might liken the breach as akin today of revealing a person’s browsing history on the internet, the newspaper said it had no regrets about divulging details of Murakami’s literary adolescence."
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What Kind of Thinker Are You?

What Kind of Thinker Are You? | educational implications | Scoop.it
 Just as team members today have assigned doing roles, there should also be thinking roles. By knowing how other members of your team and organization think — and by others knowing how you think — everyone can be more energized, more engaged, more creative, and more productive.
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Scoville scale - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Scoville scale

In Scoville's method, an exact weight of dried pepper is dissolved in alcohol to extract the heat components (capsinoids), then diluted in a solution of sugar water. Increasing concentrations of the extracted capsinoids are given to a panel of five trained tasters, until a majority (at least three) can detect the heat in a dilution.

A weakness of the Scoville Organoleptic Test is its imprecision due to human subjectivity, depending on the taster's palate and their number of mouth heat receptors, which varies greatly among people.[6] Another weakness issensory fatigue:[6] the palate is quickly desensitised to capsaicins after tasting a few samples within a short time period.[4] Results vary widely, ± 50%, between laboratories.[5]
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Why Are So Many Chefs Leaving New York?

Why Are So Many Chefs Leaving New York? | educational implications | Scoop.it
As one of the great restaurant capitals of the world, NYC’s kitchens are a revolving door for young cooks who want to learn from some of the greatest in the biz.
Sharrock's insight:
A Grub Street interview with co-owner Kevin Pemoulie went viral when the chef lamented NYC’s cutthroat restaurant climate as one of the reasons why they were leaving: “We’re looking to change and to enter into a part of the country that isn’t so insanely cutthroat and hyper-competitive. We’re really ready for change. We have ideas, but we honestly just want to reset and recharge and feel that we’re ready to do something again that we want to do — not something that we feel like will be better than this or that guy.”
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The Spice That Built VeniceThe story of an import so prized, royals were literally rolling in it


Read more: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/travel/spice-trade-pepper-venice-180956856/#0eQmWZTK2sYHS...

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Defining Curiosity

Defining Curiosity | educational implications | Scoop.it
Curiosity is a basic element of our cognition, but its biological function, mechanisms, and neural underpinning remain poorly understood. It is nonetheless a motivator for learning, influential in decision-making, and crucial for healthy development. One factor limiting our understanding of it is the lack of a widely agreed upon delineation of what is and is not curiosity. Another factor is the dearth of standardized laboratory tasks that manipulate curiosity in the lab. Despite these barriers, recent years have seen a major growth of interest in both the neuroscience and psychology of curiosity. In this Perspective, we advocate for the importance of the field, provide a selective overview of its current state, and describe tasks that are used to study curiosity and information-seeking. We propose that, rather than worry about defining curiosity, it is more helpful to consider the motivations for information-seeking behavior and to study it in its ethological context. “The Psychology and Neuroscience of Curiosity” by Celeste Kidd and Benjamin Y. Hayden in Neuron. Published online November 4 doi:10.1016/j.neuron.2015.09.010
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Covering Theory Subjects

As being a student of a professional course which encapsulates many categories of subjects (Accounts, Finance, Taxation, Management, Audit, Information technology) and requires a student to grasp all of them, it is of utmost importance that we learn the right ways to study the both practical and...

As being a student of a professional course which encapsulates many categories of subjects (Accounts, Finance, Taxation, Management, Audit, Information technology) and requires a student to grasp all of them, it is of utmost importance that we learn the right ways to study the both practical and theoretical subjects in an effective manner.

I have personally seen and realized that, at the end of day, CA students find it very difficult to cover up the theoretical subjects of their curriculum at various stages. CA course comprises of various fully (Ethics and communication, ITSM, ISCA) and partial (Financial Management, indirect Taxes) theoretical papers. And clearing them is one of the essential requirements. So, it is better that we get an insight about how to effectively manage these theoretical subjects and score well.

Though everyone has his own formulas of study and tricks of grasping the content, these are the few points I have learned through my journey so far.

Preliminary Work

Divide your whole journey in 3 parts as follows.

First phase of study when you read for the first time.
Revision phase of Study.
Final touch before exams.
However, there may be more stages but certainly can’t be less.

First Phase of Study

1. Set your initial targets for each individual subject to sum up your aggregate target. Setting targets before starting to study is a vital task for its going to decide your level of efforts in every subject.

2. Read the Syllabus and make an understanding of it.

3. Find out the subjects you are strong in and the ones you are weak in. Allocate time for each subject based on your findings and targets. Here, it is important to not ignore any subject. Care should be given, that each and every subject is given its due. First motive should be to pass the whole Group(s).

4. Special mention of a common mistake made by most of the students that don’t leave all the theory subjects for the end. Trying covering them up alongside your practical subjects. Doing all theoretical subjects together reduces the efficiency of studies.

5. When it is time to take the theory subject, understand the exam patter (number of questions, marking of questions, weightage of each chapter) and decide about the book to take up for reading and stick to it until exams.

6. During the first reading, keep making short notes. Make such notes that they are in accordance with exam pattern. (For e.g. Majority questions of ITSM Paper of IPCC consist of 2 and 4 marks. Hence, notes should be drafted in such a manner that they consist of relevant and brief points required for a 4 marks question). Making notes can be a tiresome task sometimes but it turns out to be highly helpful during revision and even for retaining the points and memorizing them in the exam hall.

7. When reading the same chapter next day, start with a short revision (memorize the main points and heading) of what was read a day before. Similarly, while closing a subject for a day, give a quick overview of points read that day. This is extremely important to retain the theory subjects.

Revision Phase of Study

a. Give another reading. First revision should be thorough and complete.

b. Memorize the points made earlier in Notes.

c. Mark the content which is still weak (use any special sign to indicate).

d. Read the questions from Practice manual and past year questions and mark the important ones.

i. Don’t assume that all the points will always be there in your mind. It’s absolutely OK as long as you are able to recall with a revision. Don’t get panic and never try to memorize things to an extent of stupidity. Believe in yourself. Things will certainly come into your mind during exams if you have read them before and revised even once. Don’t overburden yourself for it will reduce your confidence level.

ii. Special Attention should be given that there is not so much gap between the two readings of theory subjects.

Final Touch

Go through that part only which is marked as weak and questions marked as important.

Tips for revising whole syllabus in one day of Exam

Above procedure will make the three separation of the whole Syllabus of subject.

I. One that is learnt and understood properly.

II. One that is read but is still weak.

III. One that is left.

Now will revising the syllabus on that day:

1. Quickly go through the 1st part of syllabus (as described above).

2. Give repeated reading to 2nd part. (So as to grasp it for exams).

3. Now go through the questions that you have marked as important/weak earlier.

Tips for Writing in Theory Exams

1. During the 15 minutes given for reading the paper, don’t try to read the full question paper. Take up one or two questions that you now well and make up their points in your mind. It gives a good start and also prevents from the panic which is sometimes created from reading the full paper in those 15 minutes. (in case you find questions that you don’t know about)

2. Start the question you know best. First impression should be good.

3. Write in points and avoid paragraphs. Writing in points mean breaking the paragraphs into Headings with brief explanation. It helps to retain (from a student point of view) and check (from invigilator’s view).

4. Be relevant. Never try to increase the length of your answer by including the irrelevant points. Writing relevant points is a key thing in a professional exam.

5. Underline the Key Points. It is of utmost importance to highlight your knowledge.

6. Make sure you get marks of whatever you write and nothing goes waste. I have cleared the theory exams with 50% marks by attempting of just 65 marks. What matters is not the length of your answer sheet but its content. Be sure about it.

http://www.indiataxhub.com/covering-theory-subjects/


Via Taranjeet Singh Warar
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