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Finding Students' Hidden Strengths and Passions

Finding Students' Hidden Strengths and Passions | educational implications | Scoop.it
Rabbi Brad Hirschfield is the President of the National Jewish Center for Learning and Leadership and he has spent a lot of time thinking about how to inspire both. He has some ideas about how we c
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This is something I've been trying to bring to light in online discussion groups regarding the so-called creativity crisis. As the author points out: "To use the word "hidden" may not be quite accurate because often, strengths are hidden by lack of opportunity to display them." 

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, February 19, 2013 4:05 PM

This article suggests we engage in authentic conversations with our students and get to know who they are outside of school.

Lance Weihmuller's curator insight, February 19, 2013 7:16 PM

All great teaching is an act of inclusion.

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Theory and technology with possible impacts on how we learn
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Dissection of an Argument - Toolkit For Thinking

Dissection of an Argument - Toolkit For Thinking | educational implications | Scoop.it
Toolkit of ideas and techniques to help your creative and critical thinking including problem solving, logical fallacies and decision making.
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This resource may be of help for those in writing, education, and other fields where critical thinking is necessary for production and for producing value. Along with keeping rhetorical fallacies at hand. 

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Ken Robinson rebuttal

Ken Robinson rebuttal | educational implications | Scoop.it
Thanks to Scott Goodman, who sent me this essay analyzing Sir Ken's presentation on TED in response to my own piece on Sir Ken Robinson. Scott's analysis focuses more than mine on on Sir Ken's tech...
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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, July 23, 4:28 PM

I do have some issues with Sir Ken Robinson's views. For the most part, I have never considered them as an attack on classroom teachers. I see them as a justifiable criticism of a system that needs to be transformed. Quite often, his work is taken as a view that anything goes and I am not sure that is what he is suggesting. As well, I don't think he is saying the classroom teacher should be done away with. Here is where I think he does not go far enough. As a former classroom teacher, he might want to take the initiative and point out that many teachers are oppressed and provide ways for them to overcome an oppressive system which marginalizes their important and political work.

 

I found his work was often used to justify the widespread and thoughtless use of digital technologies and social media in  classrooms. With more clarification and a stand against the technocrats, bureaucrats, and so-called experts outside the classroom, Sir Ken would go a long ways towards helping improve the lot of teachers and students alike. He seems to not realize, and this is not unique to him, that many of the decision-makers are people who have not been in classrooms for decades, a sorry lot who sped through the classroom to tell us what they do not know, and others who have never been in the classroom.

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Sartre on Why “Being-in-the-World-Ness” is the Key to the Imagination

Sartre on Why “Being-in-the-World-Ness” is the Key to the Imagination | educational implications | Scoop.it
On the figure-ground relationship between the real and the irreal. Though French existentialist philosopher, novelist, and political acti
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Serial Killer Myth Number One: Mentally Ill or Evil Geniuses

Serial Killer Myth Number One: Mentally Ill or Evil Geniuses | educational implications | Scoop.it
Serial killers are rarely insane and have average intelligence.

 

Contrary to mythology, it is not high intelligence that makes serial killers successful. Instead, it is obsession, meticulous planning and a cold-blooded, often psychopathic personality that enable serial killers to operate over long periods of time without detection.

 
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U.S. Students from Educated Families Lag in International Tests

U.S. Students from Educated Families Lag in International Tests | educational implications | Scoop.it
It’s not just about kids in poor neighborhoods

 

"To ascertain whether the challenges facing the United States are concentrated among the educationally disadvantaged, we identify for each state and country the proficiency rate of students from families with parents of high, moderate, and low levels of education. If the problems are concentrated in ways that some would have us believe, U.S. students from families with high parental education should compare favorably with similarly situated students abroad. Such a finding would support the oft-repeated claim that the achievement challenges are limited to those who come from disadvantaged families (measured here by low levels of parental education)."

Sharrock's insight:

Okay. This is not good. This kind of breakdown is pretty scary. 

 

excerpt: "Lacking good information, it has been easy even for sophisticated Americans to be seduced by apologists who would have the public believe the problems are simply those of poor kids in central city schools. Our results point in quite the opposite direction. We find that the international rankings of the United States and the individual states are not much different for students from advantaged backgrounds than for those from disadvantaged ones. Although a higher proportion of U.S. students from better-educated families are proficient, that is equally true for similarly situated students in other countries. Compared to their counterparts abroad, however, U.S. students from advantaged homes lag severely behind.

 

"As long as the focus remains on distinctions within the United States, then the comfortable can remain comforted by the distance between suburbia and the inner city. But once the focus shifts to countries abroad and fair, apples-to-apples comparisons are made, it becomes manifest that nearly all of our young people—from privileged and not-so-privileged backgrounds—are not faring well.

Some say that we must cure poverty before we can address the achievement problems in our schools. Others say that our schools are generally doing fine, except for the schools serving the poor. Bringing an international perspective correctly to bear on the issue dispels both thoughts.

 

"The United States has two achievement gaps to be bridged—the one between the advantaged and the disadvantaged and the one between itself and its peers abroad. Neither goal need be sacrificed to attain the other."

 

Eric A. Hanushek is senior fellow at the Hoover Institution of Stanford University. Paul E. Peterson is professor of government and director of the Program on Education Policy and Governance at Harvard University. Ludger Woessmann is professor of economics at the University of Munich and director of the Ifo Center for the Economics of Education and Innovation. An unabridged version of this report is available athks.harvard.edu/pepg/.

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Fantastically Wrong: The Strange History of Using Organ-Shaped Plants to Treat Disease | Science | WIRED

Fantastically Wrong: The Strange History of Using Organ-Shaped Plants to Treat Disease | Science | WIRED | educational implications | Scoop.it

For tens of thousands of years before modern medicine, choosing plants that not only wouldn’t kill you, but could cure you of ills was an exercise in trial and error. So wouldn’t it be nice if nature (or God, who I guess would also be nature in a way) dropped hints as to which ones were good for the human body? Such thinking, known as the doctrine of signatures, actually developed with remarkable frequency all around the world from culture to culture. Plants meant to heal certain organs and body parts, like the liver or the eye, must show a certain “signature” by resembling the thing they treat.

 
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Will at Work Learning: People remember 10%, 20%...Oh Really?

Will at Work Learning: People remember 10%, 20%...Oh Really? | educational implications | Scoop.it

People do NOT remember 10% of what they read, 20% of what they see, 30% of what they hear, etc. That information, and similar pronouncements are fraudulent. Moreover, general statements on the effectiveness of learning methods are not credible---learning results depend on too many variables to enable such precision. Unfortunately, this bogus information has been floating around our field for decades, crafted by many different authors and presented in many different configurations, including bastardizations of Dale's Cone. The rest of this article offers more detail.

 
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excerpt: "

The bogus percentages were first published by an employee of Mobil Oil Company in 1967, writing in the magazine Film and Audio-Visual Communications. D. G. Treichler didn’t cite any research, but our field has unfortunately accepted his/her percentages ever since. NTL Institute still claims that they did the research that derived the numbers. See my response to NTL.

 

"Michael Molenda, a professor at Indiana University, is currently working to track down the origination of the bogus numbers. His efforts have uncovered some evidence that the numbers may have been developed as early as the 1940's by Paul John Phillips who worked at University of Texas at Austin and who developed training classes for the petroleum industry. During World War Two Phillips taught Visual Aids at the U. S. Army's Ordnance School at the Aberdeen (Maryland) Proving Grounds, where the numbers have also appeared and where they may have been developed.

Strange coincidence: I was born on these very same Aberdeen Proving Grounds.

 

"Ernie Rothkopf, professor emeritus of Columbia University, one of the world's leading applied research psychologists on learning, reported to me that the bogus percentages have been widely discredited, yet they keep rearing their ugly head in one form or another every few years.

 

Many people now associate the bogus percentages with Dale's "Cone of Experience," developed in 1946 by Edgar Dale. It provided an intuitive model of the concreteness of various audio-visual media. Dale included no numbers in his model and there was no research used to generate it. In fact, Dale warned his readers not to take the model too literally. 

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Creativity and the Brain: What We Can Learn From Jazz Musicians

Creativity and the Brain: What We Can Learn From Jazz Musicians | educational implications | Scoop.it
Research on what’s happening in the brain when jazz musicians improvise is helping shed light on the neuroscience behind creativity.
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Creativity and the Brain: What We Can Learn From Jazz Musicians

Creativity and the Brain: What We Can Learn From Jazz Musicians | educational implications | Scoop.it
Research on what’s happening in the brain when jazz musicians improvise is helping shed light on the neuroscience behind creativity.
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100 Diagrams That Changed the World

100 Diagrams That Changed the World | educational implications | Scoop.it
A visual history of human sensemaking, from cave paintings to the world wide web. Since the dawn of recorded history, we've been using vi
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Powerful Ad Shows What A Little Girl Hears When You Tell Her She's Pretty

Powerful Ad Shows What A Little Girl Hears When You Tell Her She's Pretty | educational implications | Scoop.it
A new Verizon commercial cites a sad statistic by the National Science Foundation: 66 percent of 4th grade girls say they like science and math, but only 18 percent of all college engineering majors are female.

People have offered many potential e...
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Culture and the parent's culture need to change! Maybe, with the law changes in marriage, customs and anxieties will decrease. Maybe parents won't worry so much about their daughters being "clean" and "pretty." On the other hand, when a female politician debates or appears on tv, there is much criticism and assessment of what she's wearing, her hairdo, and other fashion-related awareness. 

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Baccalaureate and Beyond: A First Look at the Employment Experiences and Lives of College Graduates, 4 Years On (B&B:08/12)

Find information about and locate all publications and data products on education information from the National Center for Education Statistics--NCES--. In most cases you may also browse the content of publications or download data files.
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How Technology Evolves

How Technology Evolves | educational implications | Scoop.it

three core principles of technology:

All technologies harness and exploit some phenomenon: As Heidegger argued, our development of technology depends on uncovering an aspect of nature.  Phenomena would include things as varied as how atoms form molecules, how humans interact in a social network or how supply and demand determines price.

Technologies put ideas to work for some human purpose.

All technologies are combinations: Much like biological organisms are combinations of genes, technologies are combinations of elements and their evolution proceeds in ways that are very similar to the ones Dawkins described.

Some elements are exceedingly fecund and replicate widely throughout society (e.g. transistors).   Once an idea is adopted, it is then utilized in the development of new concepts.  As the number of basic technologies expands the number of permutations increases exponentially.  That’s why technological advancement is always accelerating.

Components of technologies are themselves technologies: Arthur describes technology as recursive, exhibiting similar attributes and processes at both the component and product level.

Sharrock's insight:

"Internal combustion engines cause pollution, which creates “green” technologies, which will create their own problems that we will also have to solve.  Every advancement creates new challenges and nostalgia for a simpler time and innocence lost." --Greg Satell

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Art Works: Integrating Creativity in the Curriculum

At Boston Arts Academy, high student achievement is driven by infusing the rigorous college-prep program with visual arts, dance, theater and music.
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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, July 23, 4:07 PM

I was always amazed how focused students were when they worked aesthetically. There was a fusion of quiet and noise that made its own sounds, a buzzing and helping one another.

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This Is What a Student-Designed School Looks Like

This Is What a Student-Designed School Looks Like | educational implications | Scoop.it
The Independent Project is a result of a high school student's mission to create a school where students would feel fully engaged, have an opportunity to develop expertise in something, and learn how to learn.
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ecerpt: " Nevertheless, not a lot of students apply to participate in the project. “They know it involves more work [than taking regular classes] and that they have to push themselves to do it,” says science teacher Daniel Gray, who served as the group’s primary adviser this year. (He also had prior experience with this type of model—he had studied democratic education and then helped introduce some of those principles to a public middle school.)"
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The Six Best Books on Creativity and Innovation

The Six Best Books on Creativity and Innovation | educational implications | Scoop.it
These are the classics that teach "how" rather than "why."
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Combinatorial Creativity and the Myth of Originality

Combinatorial Creativity and the Myth of Originality | educational implications | Scoop.it
The power of the synthesizing mind and the building blocks of combinatorial creativity

 

There is a curious cultural disconnect between our mythology of spontaneous ideation – the Eureka! moment, the stroke of genius, the proverbial light bulb – and how “new” ideas actually take shape, amalgamated into existence by the combinatorial nature of creativity. To create is to combine existing bits of insight, knowledge, ideas, and memories into new material and new interpretations of the world, to connect the seemingly dissociated, to see patterns where others see chaos.

 




Read more: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/innovation/combinatorial-creativity-and-the-myth-of-originality-114843098/#Xy4TFKfIlit713iI.99
Give the gift of Smithsonian magazine for only $12! http://bit.ly/1cGUiGv
Follow us: @SmithsonianMag on Twitter

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The Moral Hazards and Legal Conundrums of Our Robot-Filled Future | Science | WIRED

The Moral Hazards and Legal Conundrums of Our Robot-Filled Future | Science | WIRED | educational implications | Scoop.it

The robots are coming, and they’re getting smarter. They’re evolving from single-task devices like Roomba and its floor-mopping, pool-cleaning cousins into machines that can make their own decisions and autonomously navigate public spaces. Thanks to artificial intelligence, machines are getting better at understanding our speech and detecting and reflecting our emotions. In many ways, they’re becoming more like us.

Whether you find it exhilarating or terrifying (or both), progress in robotics and related fields like AI is raising new ethical quandaries and challenging legal codes that were created for a world in which a sharp line separates man from machine. Last week, roboticists, legal scholars, and other experts met at the University of California, Berkeley law school to talk through some of the social, moral, and legal hazards that are likely to arise as that line starts to blur.

 

Whether you find it exhilarating or terrifying (or both), progress in robotics and related fields like AI is raising new ethical quandaries and challenging legal codes that were created for a world in which a sharp line separates man from machine. Last week, roboticists, legal scholars, and other experts met at the University of California, Berkeley law school to talk through some of the social, moral, and legal hazards that are likely to arise as that line starts to blur.

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Rote learning is bad – and other myths about education

Rote learning is bad – and other myths about education | educational implications | Scoop.it
The education system needs to produce 21st century learners, but what if we are going about achieving that in entirely the wrong way?
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Be Careful: reading this may lead you to becoming a bandwagon heretic!

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, July 16, 6:44 PM

I found two key points jumped out. First, myths are not always fictional. There is some truth, sometimes a lot, in a myth. With each succeeded generation, we have to figure out is what still makes sense in the story and what needs replacing. This leads to the second point which is that the present state of School is one of binaries and polarities. We are focused on either/or rather than the relational nature of what still works and what does not. Tradition is discarded in total and replaced with whatever the latest fad is.

 

We need more articles which make us think like heretics. The word heretic comes from the ancient Greek meaning "to be able to choose." Do we have choice to be able to choose?

Gina Paschalidou's curator insight, July 16, 10:58 PM

D. Christodoulou's '7 myths about education' book debunks common 21st century ideas about education.

The 7 myths are:

Facts prevent understanding.

Teacher-led instruction is passive.

The 21st century fundamentally changes everything.

You can always just look it up.

You should teach transferable skills.

Projects and activities are the best way to learn. 

Teaching knowledge is indoctrination. 

 

 

 

Mike Clare's curator insight, July 17, 6:07 AM

This article is thought provoking,  what should we keep from the past and what new approaches should we embrace?  Makes for an interesting discussion.

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Donald Clark Plan B: 6 reasons why we don't need ‘mentors’

Donald Clark Plan B: 6 reasons why we don't need ‘mentors’ | educational implications | Scoop.it
Little (1990:297) warned us, on mentoring, that, “relative to the amount of pragmatic activity, the volume of empirical enquiry is small [and]... that rhetoric and action have outpaced both conceptual development and empirical warrant.”  This, I fear, is not unusual in the learning world.Where such research is conducted the results are disappointing.Mentors are often seen as important learning resources in teacher education and in HE teaching development. Empirical research shows, however, that the potential is rarely realised (Edwards and Protheroe, 2003: 228; Boice, 1992: 107). The results often reveal low level "training" that simply instruct novices on the "correct" way to teach (Handal and Lauvas, 1988: 65; Hart-Landsberg et al., 1992: 31). Much mentoring has been found to be rather shallow and ineffective (Edwards, 1998: 55-56).
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Is the Quest to Build a Kinder, Gentler Surgeon Misguided?

Is the Quest to Build a Kinder, Gentler Surgeon Misguided? | educational implications | Scoop.it
When being millimeters off target can be life-changing, a surgeon needs to possess concentration, unrelenting perfectionism, and staunch self-assurance.
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Disruptive Innovation And Education - Education Next

Disruptive Innovation And Education - Education Next | educational implications | Scoop.it
Disrupting our K–12 schools or our public school districts is impossible today because there is no nonconsumption of education in this country, but helping our schools use disruptive innovation to disrupt the classroom—the way they arrange teaching...
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Emerald Insight | International Journal for Researcher Development | Understanding, attitude and environment: The essentials for developing creativity in STEM researchers

 This research demonstrates that young researchers have a complex range of perceptions of creativity, and that negative attitudes towards it are common in the STEM environment. Three key environmental facilitators of creativity were also uncovered which are: a positive research environment; sufficient constructive communication; and time and space to be creative. It is argued that more emphasis should be placed upon optimising the environment for creative work to occur.

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The Power of Leisure: How to Wisely Spend Your Free Time

The Power of Leisure: How to Wisely Spend Your Free Time | educational implications | Scoop.it
Leisure plays a huge role in our overall happiness and well-being. A new study reveals 5 main ways we benefit from leisure.

 

Detachment-Recovery – Leisure can provide a way to relax and recover after working. This helps to avoid fatigue and burnout, which can often hurt both happiness and productivity. Working 24/7 isn’t actually the best way to be productive, you need to balance between knowing when to push yourself forward vs. knowing when to take a step back and relax. Leisure allows us take time off from our major responsibilities for a little while.

 

Autonomy – Leisure can provide a sense of choice and autonomy. Often, our work and obligations are dictated by others, but pursuing hobbies on our free time gives us more control over our lives. Leisure is one of the few areas in our lives that is often self-directed and self-determined. We often require that sense of autonomy to relieve stress and feel good about ourselves.

 

Mastery – Leisure can provide a sense of accomplishment. Many hobbies, even if we enjoy doing them, require some type of effort and learning to get good at (even if it’s just doing different puzzles or playing video game). Working toward personal goals and making progress inanything can be beneficial to both your happiness and self-esteem.

 

Meaning – Leisure can provide a sense of meaning and purpose. Many activities hold personal significance to us and our lives. For example, many hobbies may be tied to a religion or spiritual tradition, or have been meaningful to you during certain times in your life. Maybe you like to play the guitar because your Dad taught you how to play, or you like to play baseball because it reminds you of your childhood.

 

Affiliation – Leisure can provide us with social interaction and affiliation. Many hobbies can be solitary or social. But the social ones (especially when they are shared with the right people), can be a rich source of community and sense of belonging, whether it’s joining a sports league, or a book club, or a wine-tasting group, or whatever. Often times we need leisure where we spend time with like-minded people.
Sharrock's insight:

In special education, the pursuit of appropriate recreation during "unstructured time" has often come up when discussing students with disabilities, but have also come up with at-risk students. We have often discussed goals for students on the spectrum to socialize or for students with intellectual challenges to become (more) independent. There are places on individual education plans for describing hobbies, skills, interests. It's good to find a return to this kind of exploration and to have a taxonomy for leisure activities and experiences to classify our needs and wants.

 

Recreation is a factor (or facet) of resilience. Recognizing these factors of recreation helps us understand that the ability to re-create is made up of a various sets of skills. Breaking down the 5 factors can help you discern what skills you made need to develop in order to benefit from these leisure experiences and activities. 

 

The big takeaway here is that there are choices that must be made and self-assessments derived from reflection that you should do. We have different needs at different times: "For example, if you mostly spend your free time only watching TV, that may help with the “detachment-recovery” aspect of leisure, but is it fulfilling your “mastery” needs, or “meaning” needs, or “affiliation” needs? Probably not."

 

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7 Habits of Exceptionally Resilient People ~ Levo League

Follow these habits to strengthen your resilience, and learn to push through all kinds of set backs.
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Fortune 500 Extinction

Be aware of the fragility of companies no matter how powerful today. Fortune 500 Firms in 1955 vs. 2011; 87% Are Gone. What do the companies in these three groups have in common? Group A. American ...
Sharrock's insight:

For some of the failures in education, I have begun to reflect on the meaning of this article, especially when it came to the Steve Jobs theory: 

 Steve Jobs has a theory about “why decline happens” at great companies: “The company does a great job, innovates and becomes a monopoly or close to it in some field, and then the quality of the product becomes less important. The company starts valuing the great salesman, because they’re the ones who can move the needle on revenues.” So salesmen are put in charge, and product engineers and designers feel demoted: Their efforts are no longer at the white-hot center of the company’s daily life. They “turn off.” IBM [IBM] and Xerox [XRX], Jobs said, faltered in precisely this way. The salesmen who led the companies were smart and eloquent, but “they didn’t know anything about the product.” In the end this can doom a great company, because what consumers want is good products.

 

I wonder what characters might be substituted for "the salesman".

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