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How to Love Someone You Don't Like

How to Love Someone You Don't Like | educational implications | Scoop.it
How we can cultivate "compassionate" love for any person through loving-kindness meditation. Buddhism meets neuroscience.
Sharrock's insight:

“Compassion has the characteristic of wishing that others be free from suffering, a wish to be extended without limits to all living beings…compassion arises by entering into the subjectivity of others, by sharing their interiority in a deep and total way. It springs up by considering that all beings, like ourselves, wish to be free from suffering, yet despite their wishes continue to be harassed by pain, fear, sorrow, and other forms of suffering.”

 

- Bhikku Bodhi

 

The thing about this pursuit is that "cultivating compassion toward others (even people we will never meet) is closely linked to mental health and well-being."

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, February 11, 2013 4:23 PM

This is a real challenge. Liking someone is not like loving them and I find it much harder to like someone. The neuroscience aspect elevates this and brings wisdom together with science.

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Dissection of an Argument - Toolkit For Thinking

Dissection of an Argument - Toolkit For Thinking | educational implications | Scoop.it
Toolkit of ideas and techniques to help your creative and critical thinking including problem solving, logical fallacies and decision making.
Sharrock's insight:

This resource may be of help for those in writing, education, and other fields where critical thinking is necessary for production and for producing value. Along with keeping rhetorical fallacies at hand. 

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Inflecting OK

Inflecting OK | educational implications | Scoop.it
A reader stumbled on the word OKing in the following: Owners of eight rooftop clubs abutting Wrigley Field sued to overturn city approval of the $375 million
Sharrock's insight:

Our language adapts. I hesitate to claim it is "evolving" but maybe this is the most appropriate word for what happens to English. 

 

the word OK is interesting here. Also, "inflection" is a new term for me. 

 

 

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Speed Kills

Speed Kills | educational implications | Scoop.it
Henry Ford’s adoption of the policy of eight hours of work, eight hours of leisure, eight hours of rest seems a quaint memory of a bygone era. For individuals as well as societies, these developments reflect a significant change in the value and social status of leisure. During the era Thorstein Veblen so vividly described in The Theory of the Leisure Class, social status was measured by how little a person worked; today it is often measured by how much a person works. If you are not constantly connected, you are unimportant; if you willingly unplug to recuperate, play, or even do nothing, you become an expendable slacker.
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Does England Have the Solution to the Grade-Inflation Problem?

Does England Have the Solution to the Grade-Inflation Problem? | educational implications | Scoop.it
In America, more and more universities are imposing strict grading curves or abolishing grades altogether. The UK takes an entirely different approach, and it's working.
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Meta-analysis in medical research

The traditional basis of medical practice has been changed by the use of randomized, blinded, multicenter clinical trials and meta-analysis, leading to the widely used term "evidence-based medicine". Leaders in initiating this change have been the Cochrane Collaboration who have produced guidelines for conducting systematic reviews and meta-analyses10 and recently the PRISMA statement, a helpful resource to improve reporting of systematic reviews and meta-analyses has been released11. Moreover, standards by which to conduct and report meta-analyses of observational studies have been published to improve the quality of reporting71.

Meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials is not an infallible tool, however, and several examples exist of meta-analyses which were later contradicted by single large randomized controlled trials, and of meta-analyses addressing the same issue which have reached opposite conclusions72. A recent example, was the controversy between a meta-analysis of 42 studies73 and the subsequent publication of the large-scale trial (RECORD trial) that did not support the cardiovascular risk of rosiglitazone74. However, the reason for this controversy was explained by the numerous methodological flaws found both in the meta-analysis and the large clinical trial75.

No single study, whether meta-analytic or not, will provide the definitive understanding of responses to treatment, diagnostic tests, or risk factors influencing disease. Despite this limitation, meta-analytic approaches have demonstrable benefits in addressing the limitations of study size, can include diverse populations, provide the opportunity to evaluate new hypotheses, and are more valuable than any single study contributing to the analysis. The conduct of the studies is critical to the value of a meta-analysis and the methods used need to be as rigorous as any other study conducted.

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What Is Experiential Learning?

What Is Experiential Learning? | educational implications | Scoop.it
Experiential learning theory suggests that all learning is created by grasping and transforming experiences. Learn more about the theory and the experiential learning cycle.

Via Elizabeth E Charles, Suvi Salo, Ivon Prefontaine
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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, October 16, 7:52 PM

The names of those involved in the foundational thinking behind experiential learning is impressive i.e. Dewey and Piaget. As well, Montessori's name might be added to the list.

 

@ivon_ehd1

David W. Deeds's curator insight, October 16, 10:43 PM

Thanks to Ivon Prefontaine.

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AXE Canada wins big with its first eCommerce launch!

AXE Canada wins big with its first eCommerce launch! | educational implications | Scoop.it

We've all seen the "Leave a Man, Come Back a Hero" TV spots for AXE's Apollo Space campaign. Another way that that the personal care brand has added onto this IMC is through the eCommerce activation. AXE partnered with online beauty and grooming retailer Well.ca to offer fans the chance to try the Apollo products before it hit traditional “Brick and Motor” stores such as Shoppers Drug Mart. AXE consumers would benefit from exclusively sampling the products before their peers and having the convenience of the product delivered to their doorstep. AXE used its AXE Canada Facebook page, with over 340,000 fans, to draw attention to the Apollo Well.ca page. This was the first eCommerce activation orchestrated by Unilever Canada and due to the large success one can predict that the personal care brands will continue to enter this growing landscape. 

 

Although the IMC as a whole is affective, one would argue that the online purchasing aspect is a hybrid of cognitive and conative. For consumers that are more inclined to purchase online and more comfortable with online purchasing this becomes an impulse purchase and is more conative. However, if the consumer is not showing a greater propensity of consume online it is a cognitive purchase and the consumer purchases online because of the convenience of purchasing online and the exclusivity of receiving a product that is not yet released. Due to the functionality of the eCommerce website the stage of the buying process is obviously the purchasing area.

This ultimately will achieve the same objectives as the TV spot. AXE wants to appeal as a relevant brand to younger consumers and one of the best ways to do so is buy using a tool that reflects and embodies the consumers’ digital literacy. By occupying the eCommerce landscape, an area that the target is already comfortable with, AXE can achieve it’s communication goals all the while driving trial to the AXE Masterbrand. If more consumers who use one AXE products start using more products within the portfolio AXE can own the consumers grooming regime and ultimately win the category.

 

Brendon Holder, 06096125, COMM335-02; campaign, eCommerce, digital, IMC, purchase behaviour;

 


Via Joachim Scholz, PhD
Sharrock's insight:

has the word "conative" in it.

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Leon Thomason's curator insight, March 20, 2013 9:45 PM

This article effectivley shows that new and creative stragies used by marketers are a great way to generate short term financial gains and quickly gain new customer attention. Axe used a special online offer where consumers were exposed to the 'AXE Apollo Spcae Campaign' and could try the product before it hit shelves by ordering it off popular Canadian Website www.Well.ca.Their consumers benefited by sampling the product before anyone else and also the convience of having it delivered to the door, making it a very easy 'impulse buy'. This strongly cuts down a consumers cost (money and time cost) and is very convient, creating a positive image for the brand and essentially and effectively growing brand equity and cultivating customer relationships. 

Stella Gao's comment, March 21, 2013 6:58 AM
AXE uses advertising and promotion to get attention from consumers, and start building the relationship between them quickly. The marketers using good marketing strategies,such as advertising and promotion, for both short-term and long-term effects. This is a really good case study to show that using appropriate marketing strategies is important to business.
Bk Chin's comment, March 21, 2013 6:58 AM
This gave me a better understanding of how to create customer relationships and value through marketing as well as that organisations need to focus on assessing and satisfying consumer needs; including money and time cost.
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Daniel Tiger: Won't You Be His Neighbor

Daniel Tiger: Won't You Be His Neighbor | educational implications | Scoop.it
The PBS program Daniel Tiger's Neighborhood is bringing the legacy of Fred Rogers to a new generation of children. » E-Mail This
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Fiction University: NaNoWriMo Prep: Planning Your Novel

Fiction University: NaNoWriMo Prep: Planning Your Novel | educational implications | Scoop.it
Today, let’s focus on the overall plotting of your novel, so when you do need to write like the wind, you’re not spending a lot of time thinking about what to write. I’m assuming that if you decided to do NaNo, you already have an inkling of the novel you want to write. If you don’t, then I’d suggest starting here for some brainstorming ideas before diving into today’s article.
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What Do We Know About Human Intelligence?

What Do We Know About Human Intelligence? | educational implications | Scoop.it
What do we know about the science of human intelligence? Douglas Detterman, emeritus professor at Case Western Reserve University, shares what he has learned from decades of working in this field.
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Theories of Agency

Theories of Agency

Key concepts present within "agency": the individual, action, will, intentionality, choice, freedom

Key concepts against which "agency" is commonly situated: structure, determinism, society, environment, inevitability

 
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The Effort Effect--Carol Dweck

The Effort Effect--Carol Dweck | educational implications | Scoop.it

The Effort Effect

According to a Stanford psychologist, you’ll reach new heights if you learn to embrace the occasional tumble.

James Yang

 

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By Marina Krakovsky

 

One day last November, psychology professor Carol Dweck welcomed a pair of visitors from the Blackburn Rovers, a soccer team in the United Kingdom’s Premier League. The Rovers’ training academy is ranked in England’s top three, yet performance director Tony Faulkner had long suspected that many promising players weren’t reaching their potential. Ignoring the team’s century-old motto—arte et labore, or “skill and hard work”—the most talented individuals disdained serious training.

On some level, Faulkner knew the source of the trouble: British soccer culture held that star players are born, not made. If you buy into that view, and are told you’ve got immense talent, what’s the point of practice? If anything, training hard would tell you and others that you’re merely good, not great. Faulkner had identified the problem; but to fix it, he needed Dweck’s help.

A 60-year-old academic psychologist might seem an unlikely sports motivation guru. But Dweck’s expertise—and her recent book, Mindset: The New Psychology of Success—bear directly on the sort of problem facing the Rovers. Through more than three decades of systematic research, she has been figuring out answers to why some people achieve their potential while equally talented others don’t—why some become Muhammad Ali and others Mike Tyson. The key, she found, isn’t ability; it’s whether you look at ability as something inherent that needs to be demonstrated or as something that can be developed.

What’s more, Dweck has shown that people can learn to adopt the latter belief and make dramatic strides in performance. These days, she’s sought out wherever motivation and achievement matter, from education and parenting to business management and personal development.

As a graduate student at Yale, Dweck started off studying animal motivation. In the late 1960s, a hot topic in animal research was “learned helplessness”: lab animals sometimes didn’t do what they were capable of because they’d given up from repeat failures. Dweck wondered how humans coped with that. “I asked, ‘What makes a really capable child give up in the face of failure, where other children may be motivated by the failure?’” she recalls.

At the time, the suggested cure for learned helplessness was a long string of successes. Dweck posited that the difference between the helpless response and its opposite—the determination to master new things and surmount challenges—lay in people’s beliefs about why they had failed. People who attributed their failures to lack of ability, Dweck thought, would become discouraged even in areas where they were capable. Those who thought they simply hadn’t tried hard enough, on the other hand, would be fueled by setbacks. This became the topic of her PhD dissertation.

Dweck and her assistants ran an experiment on elementary school children whom school personnel had identified as helpless. These kids fit the definition perfectly: if they came across a few math problems they couldn’t solve, for example, they no longer could do problems they had solved before—and some didn’t recover that ability for days.

Through a series of exercises, the experimenters trained half the students to chalk up their errors to insufficient effort, and encouraged them to keep going. Those children learned to persist in the face of failure—and to succeed. The control group showed no improvement at all, continuing to fall apart quickly and to recover slowly. These findings, says Dweck, “really supported the idea that the attributions were a key ingredient driving the helpless and mastery-oriented patterns.” Her 1975 article on the topic has become one of the most widely cited in contemporary psychology.

Attribution theory, concerned with people’s judgments about the causes of events and behavior, already was an active area of psychological research. But the focus at the time was on how we make attributions, explains Stanford psychology professor Lee Ross, who coined the term “fundamental attribution error” for our tendency to explain other people’s actions by their character traits, overlooking the power of circumstances. Dweck, he says, helped “shift the emphasis from attributional errors and biases to the consequences of attributions—why it matters what attributions people make.” Dweck had put attribution theory to practical use.

She continued to do so as an assistant professor at the University of Illinois, collaborating with then-graduate student Carol Diener to have children “think out loud” as they faced problem-solving tasks, some too difficult for them. The big surprise: some of the children who put forth lots of effort didn’t make attributions at all. These children didn’t think they were failing. Diener puts it this way: “Failure is information—we label it failure, but it’s more like, ‘This didn’t work, I’m a problem solver, and I’ll try something else.’” During one unforgettable moment, one boy—something of a poster child for the mastery-oriented type—faced his first stumper by pulling up his chair, rubbing his hands together, smacking his lips and announcing, “I love a challenge.”

Such zest for challenge helped explain why other capable students thought they lacked ability just because they’d hit a setback. Common sense suggests that ability inspires self-confidence. And it does for a while—so long as the going is easy. But setbacks change everything. Dweck realized—and, with colleague Elaine Elliott soon demonstrated—that the difference lay in the kids’ goals. “The mastery-oriented children are really hell-bent on learning something,” Dweck says, and “learning goals” inspire a different chain of thoughts and behaviors than “performance goals.”

Students for whom performance is paramount want to look smart even if it means not learning a thing in the process. For them, each task is a challenge to their self-image, and each setback becomes a personal threat. So they pursue only activities at which they’re sure to shine—and avoid the sorts of experiences necessary to grow and flourish in any endeavor. Students with learning goals, on the other hand, take necessary risks and don’t worry about failure because each mistake becomes a chance to learn. Dweck’s insight launched a new field of educational psychology—achievement goal theory.

Dweck’s next question: what makes students focus on different goals in the first place? During a sabbatical at Harvard, she was discussing this with doctoral student Mary Bandura (daughter of legendary Stanford psychologist Albert Bandura), and the answer hit them: if some students want to show off their ability, while others want to increase their ability, “ability” means different things to the two groups. “If you want to demonstrate something over and over, it feels like something static that lives inside of you—whereas if you want to increase your ability, it feels dynamic and malleable,” Dweck explains. People with performance goals, she reasoned, think intelligence is fixed from birth. People with learning goals have a growth mind-set about intelligence, believing it can be developed. (Among themselves, psychologists call the growth mind-set an “incremental theory,” and use the term “entity theory” for the fixed mind-set.) The model was nearly complete (see diagram).

Growing up in Brooklyn in the ’50s, Dweck did well in elementary school, earning a spot in a sixth-grade class of other high achievers. Not just any spot, it turned out. Their teacher, Mrs. Wilson, seated the students in IQ order and even used IQ scores to dole out classroom responsibilities. Whether Mrs. Wilson meant to or not, she was conveying her belief in fixed intelligence. Dweck, who was in row 1, seat 1, believes Mrs. Wilson’s intentions were good. The experience didn’t scar her—Dweck says she already had some of the growth mind-set—but she has shown that many students pegged as bright, especially girls, don’t fare as well.

Tests, Dweck notes, are notoriously poor at measuring potential. Take a group of adults and ask them to draw a self-portrait. Most Americans think of drawing as a gift they don’t have, and their portraits look no better than a child’s scribbles. But put them in a well-designed class—as Betty Edwards, the author ofDrawing on the Right Side of the Brain, has—and the resulting portraits look so skilled it’s hard to believe they’re the work of the same “talentless” individuals. The belief that you can’t improve stunts achievement.

Culture can play a large role in shaping our beliefs, Dweck says. A college physics teacher recently wrote to Dweck that in India, where she was educated, there was no notion that you had to be a genius or even particularly smart to learn physics. “The assumption was that everyone could do it, and, for the most part, they did.” But what if you’re raised with a fixed mind-set about physics—or foreign languages or music? Not to worry: Dweck has shown that you can change the mind-set itself.

The most dramatic proof comes from a recent study by Dweck and Lisa Sorich Blackwell of low-achieving seventh graders. All students participated in sessions on study skills, the brain and the like; in addition, one group attended a neutral session on memory while the other learned that intelligence, like a muscle, grows stronger through exercise. Training students to adopt a growth mind-set about intelligence had a catalytic effect on motivation and math grades; students in the control group showed no improvement despite all the other interventions.

“Study skills and learning skills are inert until they’re powered by an active ingredient,” Dweck explains. Students may know how to study, but won’t want to if they believe their efforts are futile. “If you target that belief, you can see more benefit than you have any reason to hope for.”

The classroom workshop isn’t feasible on a large scale; for one thing, it’s too costly. So Dweck and Blackwell have designed a computer-based training module to simulate the live intervention. Their hip multimedia software, called Brainology, is still in development, but thanks to early buzz from a Time magazine article and Dweck’s recent book, teachers have begun clamoring for it, one even asking to become a distributor.

Unlike much that passes for wisdom about education and performance, Dweck’s conclusions are grounded in solid research. She’s no rah-rah motivational coach proclaiming the sky’s the limit and attitude is everything; that’s too facile. But the evidence shows that if we hold a fixed mind-set, we’re bound not to reach as high as we might.

Although much of Dweck’s research on mind-sets has taken place in school settings, it’s applicable to sports, business, interpersonal relationships and so on. “Lots and lots of people are interested in her work; it touches on so many different areas of psychology and areas outside of psychology,” says Stanford psychology professor Mark Lepper, ’66, who as department chair in 2004 lured Dweck away from Columbia, where she’d been for 15 years. “The social psychologists like to say she’s a social psychologist; the personality psychologists say she’s a personality psychologist; and the developmental psychologists say she’s a developmental psychologist,” Lepper adds.

By all rights, her appeal should transcend academia, says New Yorker writer Malcolm Gladwell, who is well known for making psychological research accessible to the general public. “One of the most popular pieces I ever did relied very heavily on work done by Carol Dweck,” he said in a December interview in theJournal of Management Inquiry. “Carol Dweck deserves a big audience. It is criminal if she does not get that audience.” Perhaps Mindset will help; it was written for lay readers.

It certainly cemented Tony Faulkner’s belief that Dweck could help the Blackburn Rovers soccer team. Unlike the disadvantaged kids in Dweck’s middle-school study, the Rovers didn’t think they lacked what it took to succeed. Quite the opposite: they thought their talent should take them all the way. Yet both groups’ fixed mind-set about ability explains their aversion to effort.

But aren’t there plenty of people who believe in innate ability and in the notion that nothing comes without effort? Logically, the two ideas are compatible. But psychologically, explains Dweck, many people who believe in fixed intelligence also think you shouldn’t need hard work to do well. This belief isn’t entirely irrational, she says. A student who finishes a problem set in 10 minutes is indeed better at math than someone who takes four hours to solve the problems. And a soccer player who scores effortlessly probably is more talented than someone who’s always practicing. “The fallacy comes when people generalize it to the belief that effort on any task, even very hard ones, implies low ability,” Dweck says.

Her advice for the Rovers rings true for anyone stuck in a fixed mind-set. “Changing mind-sets is not like surgery,” she says. “You can’t simply remove the fixed mind-set and replace it with the growth mind-set.” The Rovers are starting their workshops with recent recruits—their youngest, most malleable players. (Faulkner realizes that players who’ve already earned millions from being “naturals” have little incentive to reshape their brains.) The team’s talent scouts will be asking about new players’ views on talent and training—not to screen out those with a fixed mind-set, but to target them for special training.

In his 2002 essay that relied on Dweck’s work, Gladwell cited one of her best-known experiments to argue that Enron may have collapsed precisely because of the company’s talent-obsessed culture, not despite it. Dweck’s study showed that praising children for intelligence, rather than for effort, sapped their motivation (see sidebar). But more disturbingly, 40 percent of those whose intelligence was praised overstated their scores to peers. “We took ordinary children and made them into liars,” Dweck says. Similarly, Enron executives who’d been celebrated for their innate talent would sooner lie than fess up to problems and work to fix them.

Business School professor Jeffrey Pfeffer says Dweck’s research has implications for the more workaday problem of performance management. He faults businesses for spending too much time in rank-and-yank mode, grading and evaluating people instead of developing their skills. “It’s like the Santa Claus theory of management: who’s naughty and who’s nice.”

Leaders, too, can benefit from Dweck’s work, says Robert Sternberg, PhD ’75, Tufts University’s dean of the School of Arts and Sciences. Sternberg, a past president of the American Psychological Association, says that excessive concern with looking smart keeps you from making bold, visionary moves. “If you’re afraid of making mistakes, you’ll never learn on the job, and your whole approach becomes defensive: ‘I have to make sure I don’t screw up.’”

Social psychologist Peter Salovey, ’80, MA ’80, dean of Yale College and a pioneer in the field of emotional intelligence, says Dweck’s ideas have helped him think through a controversy in his field. Echoing an older debate about the malleability of general intelligence, some scholars say emotional intelligence is largely inborn, while others, like Salovey, see it as a set of skills that can be taught and learned. “People say to me all the time, ‘I’m not a people person,’ or ‘I’m not good at managing my emotions,’” unaware that they’re expressing a fixed mind-set, Salovey says.

Stanford psychology professor James Gross has begun extending Dweck’s work to emotions. In a recent study, Gross and his colleagues followed a group of Stanford undergrads as they made the transition to college life. Those with a fixed mind-set about emotions were less able to manage theirs, and by the end of freshman year, they’d shown poorer social and emotional adjustment than their growth-minded counterparts.

As she approaches the end of her third year at Stanford, Dweck has embraced the challenge of cross-country culture shock in a manner consistent with the growth mind-set. Nearby San Francisco provides her with the benefits of a great city, she says, including a dining scene that rivals New York’s; and the University supplies a more cozy sense of community. She’s also brought a bit of the New York theater scene with her in the form of her husband, critic and director David Goldman. He founded and directs the National Center for New Plays at Stanford.

At the Association for Psychological Science convention in May, Dweck will give the keynote address. The topic: “Can Personality Be Changed?” Her short answer, of course, is yes. Moreover, holding a growth mind-set bodes well for one’s relationships. In a recent study, Dweck found that people who believe personality can change were more likely than others to bring up concerns and deal with problems in a constructive way. Dweck thinks a fixed mind-set fosters a categorical, all-or-nothing view of people’s qualities; this view tends to make you ignore festering problems or, at the other extreme, give up on a relationship at the first sign of trouble. (The growth mind-set, though, can be taken too far if someone stays in an abusive relationship hoping her partner will change; as always, the person has to want to change.)

These days, Dweck is applying her model to kids’ moral development. Young children may not always have beliefs about ability, but they do have ideas about goodness. Many kids believe they’re invariably good or bad; other kids think they can get better at being good. Dweck has already found that preschoolers with this growth mind-set feel okay about themselves after they’ve messed up and are less judgmental of others; they’re also more likely than kids with a fixed view of goodness to try to set things right and to learn from their mistakes. They understand that spilling juice or throwing toys, for example, doesn’t damn a kid as bad, so long as the child cleans up and resolves to do better next time. Now Dweck and graduate student Allison Master are running experiments at Bing Nursery School to see if teaching kids the growth mind-set improves their coping skills. They’ve designed a storybook with the message that preschoolers can go from “bad” one year to better the next. Can hearing such stories help a 4-year-old handle a sandbox setback?

Dweck’s students from over the years describe her as a generous, nurturing mentor. She’d surely attribute these traits not to an innate gift, but to a highly developed mind-set. “Just being aware of the growth mind-set, and studying it and writing about it, I feel compelled to live it and to benefit from it,” says Dweck, who took up piano as an adult and learned to speak Italian in her 50s. “These are things that adults are not supposed to be good at learning.”


Via Lynnette Van Dyke, Julie LaPlante
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What Is Self-Efficacy?

What Is Self-Efficacy? | educational implications | Scoop.it
Psychologist Albert Bandura suggested that self-efficacy plays a critical role in how we think, feel, and behave. Learn more about what self-efficacy is and why it is so important.

Via Luis Valdes, Ken Donaldson
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There is no difference between "grit" and "self-efficacy", especially when self-efficacy is explored in terms of human agency. 

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Magic May Lurk Inside Us All - NYTimes.com

Magic May Lurk Inside Us All - NYTimes.com | educational implications | Scoop.it
Several streams of research in psychology, neuroscience and philosophy are converging on an uncomfortable truth: We’re more susceptible to magical thinking than we’d like to admit.
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Frontiers | Metacognition and action: a new pathway to understanding social and cognitive aspects of expertise in sport | Cognition

For over a century, psychologists have investigated the mental processes of expert performers - people who display exceptional knowledge and/or skills in specific fields of human achievement. Since...
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Educational Psychology Interactive: Systems model of human behavior (Overview)

Educational Psychology Interactive: Systems model of human behavior (Overview) | educational implications | Scoop.it
one must not only understand the entities in isolation, but must understand the relationships between or among entities. In this view, it is not enough to first study the development of thinking and then the development of emotion or to identify separate factors that make an effective school, rather these must be studied together in order to understand the relationships among the factors. This systems or organismic view reflects a transactional approach to educational and developmental psychology (e.g., Gordon, 1975; Schiamberg & Smith, 1982; Thompson, 1971) and provides the basis for the framework for studying human behavior presented below. Additionally, Koestler (1990) proposed that each individual component is a holon (simultaneously both a part and a whole) arranged in a holarchy (a never-ending relationship of parts to whole).
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Tony Meehan's curator insight, October 26, 9:09 AM

Thoughtful, Interesting and concise piece articulating the complexities of human behaviour, identifying what influences and shapes us as individuals: Cognitive, Affective, Conative, Spiritual and Behavioural (overt action); and then going on to explain how it is we as individuals fit into the cosmos along with its layers of influence from:

Person (as above) 

microsystem (the family along with  local neighborhood or community institutions such as the schoolreligious institutions and peer groups as well as the specific culture within which the family identifies) 

Mesosystem (includes social institutions involved in such activities as transportation, entertainment, news organizations

Macrosystem (international region we live in and more abstract notions of culture, such as how the digital age impacts upon local culture)

Cosmos (the planet we live on, the star we get heat and energy from and the rest of the universe.



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Published for the First Time: a 1959 Essay by Isaac Asimov on Creativity | MIT Technology Review

Published for the First Time: a 1959 Essay by Isaac Asimov on Creativity | MIT Technology Review | educational implications | Scoop.it
Note from Arthur Obermayer, friend of the author:

In 1959, I worked as a scientist at Allied Research Associates in Boston. The company was an MIT spinoff that originally focused on the effects of nuclear weapons on aircraft structures. The company received a contract with the acronym GLIPAR (Guide Line Identification Program for Antimissile Research) from the Advanced Research Projects Agency to elicit the most creative approaches possible for a ballistic missile defense system. The government recognized that no matter how much was spent on improving and expanding current technology, it would remain inadequate. They wanted us and a few other contractors to think “out of the box.”

When I first became involved in the project, I suggested that Isaac Asimov, who was a good friend of mine, would be an appropriate person to participate. He expressed his willingness and came to a few meetings. He eventually decided not to continue, because he did not want to have access to any secret classified information; it would limit his freedom of expression. Before he left, however, he wrote this essay on creativity as his single formal input. This essay was never published or used beyond our small group. When I recently rediscovered it while cleaning out some old files, I recognized that its contents are as broadly relevant today as when he wrote it. It describes not only the creative process and the nature of creative people but also the kind of environment that promotes creativity.
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What You Eat Affects Your Productivity

What You Eat Affects Your Productivity | educational implications | Scoop.it
Don’t let poor lunch decisions derail your day.
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good advice for administrators and other educators.
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The 10 Most Important Work Skills in 2020

The 10 Most Important Work Skills in 2020 | educational implications | Scoop.it

Via Beth Dichter
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Carlos Rodrigues Cadre's curator insight, October 17, 11:16 AM

adicionar a sua visão ...

Ante Lauc's curator insight, October 18, 1:48 AM

With better insight  who we are, what is our mission, the outcome will be much better. 

GIANFRANCO MARINI's curator insight, October 18, 3:30 AM

le 10 più importanti competenze e abilità per chi entrerà nel mondo del lavoro intorno al 2020.

 

L'infografica indica i principali trend e le principali competenze necessarie per lavorare nel futuro prossimo:

design mindset

transdisciplinarietà

cognitive management

collaborazione virtuale

competenze cross culturali

pensiero computazionale

competenze nei new media

intelligenza sociale

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Slow to mature, quick to distract: ADHD study finds slower development of neural connections

Slow to mature, quick to distract: ADHD study finds slower development of neural connections | educational implications | Scoop.it
A peek inside the brains of more than 750 children and teens reveals a key difference in brain architecture between those with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and those without.

Via Lou Salza
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Barbara Hunter's curator insight, September 17, 7:50 AM

This further validates Dr. Russell Barkley's 3 year/30% claim regarding developmental lag in social/emotional problem solving and difficulty with goal attainment...Executive Functions...

julieta's curator insight, October 2, 12:29 PM

agregar su visión ...

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, October 14, 12:42 PM

This is an interesting article that casts ADHD/ADD into a different light.

 

@ivon_ehd1

 

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Resilience Thinking - Integrating Resilience, Adaptability and Transformability

Resilience Thinking - Integrating Resilience, Adaptability and Transformability | educational implications | Scoop.it
Resilience thinking addresses the dynamics and development of complex social–ecological systems (SES). Three aspects are central: resilience, adaptability and transformability. These aspects interr...
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When Anxiety Hits at School

When Anxiety Hits at School | educational implications | Scoop.it
As the number of teens who suffer from anxiety disorders continues to grow, mental-health care is increasingly part of school nurses' job descriptions. " In the face of the student population’s changing problems, both nurses and counselors have had to adapt the way they practice to continue meeting kids’ needs. Lutz, a counselor of 12 years, said that with the rising prevalence of anxiety, she has had to become more knowledgeable about the illness and more connected to resources that can aid students and families. Sevier agreed that constant education is key."
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STANFORD TALKS » Talk Archive » Albert Bandura: “Toward an Agentic Theory for the New Millennium”

STANFORD TALKS » Talk Archive » Albert Bandura: “Toward an Agentic Theory for the New Millennium” | educational implications | Scoop.it
Toward an Agentic Theory for the New Millennium

Albert Bandura
(Stanford University)
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Date: 07/23/2012

Description:

Albert Bandura, the David Starr Jordan Professor (Emeritus) of Social Science in Psychology at Stanford University and winner of the 2012 IUPsyS Lifetime Career Award, presents his talk entitled, “Toward an Agentic Theory for the New Millennium”.

Further Information:

http://www.mildemarketing.co.uk/articles/iupsys-abandura
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Toward an Agentic Theory for the New MillenniumAlbert Bandura(Stanford University)

Play MP4 Video

Play Audio File

Date: 07/23/2012

Description:

Albert Bandura, the David Starr Jordan Professor (Emeritus) of Social Science in Psychology at Stanford University and winner of the 2012 IUPsyS Lifetime Career Award, presents his talk entitled, “Toward an Agentic Theory for the New Millennium”.

 

Further Information:

http://www.mildemarketing.co.uk/articles/iupsys-abandura

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A Visual: The Workflow of Social Learning

A Visual: The Workflow of Social Learning | educational implications | Scoop.it

Jane Hart from the Center for Learning & Performance Technologies released the following clickable guide to learning in a social organization.

 

What’s interesting is the role of social dynamics outlined, which parallels some of Albert Bandura’s (among other researchers and theorists) ideas on the role of observation in learning, specifically attention and imitation in a (formal or informal) learning “workflow.”


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Bandura, the Theory of Social Learning and Education

Bandura, the Theory of Social Learning and Education | educational implications | Scoop.it
Albert Bandura is a psychologist from Canada who is currently a professor at the Stanford University. He is widely described as the greatest living psychologist and one of the most influential of o...

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TY! @drseide 4: Learning Strategies trump IQ in Predicting Achievement |, Scientific American

TY! @drseide 4: Learning Strategies trump IQ in Predicting Achievement |, Scientific American | educational implications | Scoop.it
In the 1960s, the legendary psychologist Albert Bandura rejected the view that learning is passive. Instead he emphasized the importance of the active use of learning strategies. ...

Via Lou Salza
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Lou Salza's insight:

There is so much data now that indicates the guided practice and learning staratagies we have offered in independent LD school matters and works!   --Lou 

 

Excerpt:

"....Over the past few decades there have been multiple studies showing the effectiveness of the self-regulated learning strategies approach using a variety of methodologies (e.g., think-aloud protocols, diaries, observation). In one recent large review, John Dunlosky and colleagues evaluated the relative utility of ten learning strategies. While some of the learning strategies (e.g., highlighting, rereading) were found to have low utility in benefitting learning outcomes, the following strategies were assessed as having moderate to high utility: practice testing (high), distributed practice (high), elaborative interrogation (medium), self-explanation (medium), and interleaved practice (medium). Practice testing had the most evidence supporting its benefits for learning across context and over time...."

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Lou Salza's curator insight, April 8, 2013 9:09 PM

There is so much data now that indicates the guided practice and learning staratagies we have offered in independent LD school matters and works!   --Lou 

 

Excerpt:

"....Over the past few decades there have been multiple studies showing the effectiveness of the self-regulated learning strategies approach using a variety of methodologies (e.g., think-aloud protocols, diaries, observation). In one recent large review, John Dunlosky and colleagues evaluated the relative utility of ten learning strategies. While some of the learning strategies (e.g., highlighting, rereading) were found to have low utility in benefitting learning outcomes, the following strategies were assessed as having moderate to high utility: practice testing (high), distributed practice (high), elaborative interrogation (medium), self-explanation (medium), and interleaved practice (medium). Practice testing had the most evidence supporting its benefits for learning across context and over time...."

Brenda Elliott's curator insight, April 9, 2013 9:12 PM

Very interesting study- effective learning strategies more important than IQ in predicting achievement-