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Adam Savage: How Simple Ideas Lead to Scientific Discoveries

View full lesson on TED-Ed BETA: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/how-simple-ideas-lead-to-scientific-discoveries Adam Savage walks through two spectacular examples...

Via Lisa Durff
Sharrock's insight:

Energizing stories to inspire generations to come. I also love the story about aristotle and many other educated people knew the Earth was round before Columbus. Why don't we teach this kind of stuff? Why do you stick to the same old stories about Columbus? How can we teach students (and me) how to develop such formula to reproduce the lightspeed activity?

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Sharrock's curator insight, January 22, 2013 3:16 PM

Energizing stories to inspire generations to come. I also love the story about aristotle and many other educated people knew the Earth was round before Columbus. Why don't we teach this kind of stuff? Why do you stick to the same old stories about Columbus? How can we teach students (and me) how to develop such formula to reproduce the lightspeed activity?

Sharrock's curator insight, January 22, 2013 3:16 PM

Energizing stories to inspire generations to come. I also love the story about aristotle and many other educated people knew the Earth was round before Columbus. Why don't we teach this kind of stuff? Why do you stick to the same old stories about Columbus? How can we teach students (and me) how to develop such formula to reproduce the lightspeed activity?

educational implications
Theory and technology with possible impacts on how we learn
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Dissection of an Argument - Toolkit For Thinking

Dissection of an Argument - Toolkit For Thinking | educational implications | Scoop.it
Toolkit of ideas and techniques to help your creative and critical thinking including problem solving, logical fallacies and decision making.
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This resource may be of help for those in writing, education, and other fields where critical thinking is necessary for production and for producing value. Along with keeping rhetorical fallacies at hand. 

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Sometimes Tools Can Get In Your Way

Sometimes Tools Can Get In Your Way | educational implications | Scoop.it
WYSIWYG (What you see is what you get) tools are awesome. They show you exactly how things will look (assuming that the viewer of your work has a system that is exactly like yours).
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Life is Getting Better: Societal Evolution and Fit with Human Nature

Life is Getting Better: Societal Evolution and Fit with Human Nature | educational implications | Scoop.it
Human society has changed much over the last centuries and this process of ‘modernization’ has profoundly affected the lives of individuals; currently we live quite different lives from those forefathers lived only five generations ago. There is difference of opinion as to whether we live better now than before and consequently there is also disagreement as to whether we should continue modernizing or rather try to slow the process down. Quality-of-life in a society can be measured by how long and happy its inhabitants live. Using these indicators I assess whether societal modernization has made life better or worse. Firstly I examine findings of present day survey research. I start with a cross-sectional analysis of 143 nations in the years 2000–2008 and find that people live longer and happier in today’s most modern societies. Secondly I examine trends in modern nations over the last decade and find that happiness and longevity have increased in most cases. Thirdly I consider the long-term and review findings from historical anthropology, which show that we lived better in the early hunter-gatherer society than in the later agrarian society. Together these data suggest that societal evolution has worked out differently for the quality of human life, first negatively, in the change from a hunter-gatherer existence to agriculture, and next positively, in the more recent transformation from an agrarian to an industrial society. We live now longer and happier than ever before.
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What is success? What is progress? What are ways to measure and find the evidence?

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Schools with more minorities tend to punish students rather than seek psychological interventions

Schools with more minorities tend to punish students rather than seek psychological interventions | educational implications | Scoop.it
Poor schools that have more black and minority students tend to punish students rather than seek medical or psychological interventions for them, according to a Penn State sociologist.
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Resilience | Psychology Today

Resilience | Psychology Today | educational implications | Scoop.it
Resilience is that ineffable quality that allows some people to be knocked down by life and come back stronger than ever. Rather than letting failure overcome them and drain their resolve, they find a way to rise from the ashes. Psychologists have identified some of the factors that make someone resilient, among them a positive attitude, optimism, the ability to regulate emotions, and the ability to see failure as a form of helpful feedback. Even after misfortune, resilient people are blessed with such an outlook that they are able to change course and soldier on.
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This is a collection of articles about resilience that can help build understanding of this quality. 

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Psychological resilience - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Psychological resilience - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Psychological resilience is defined as an individual's ability to properly adapt to stress and adversity. Stress and adversity can come in the shape of family or relationship problems, health problems, or workplace and financial worries, among others. Resilience is not a rare ability; in reality, it is found in the average individual and it can be learned and developed by virtually anyone.

Resilience in children refers to individuals who are doing better than expected, given a history that includes risk or adverse experience. Therefore, it is not a trait or something that some children 'just have.' There is no such thing as an 'invulnerable child' who can overcome any obstacle or adversity that she encounters in life and in fact the trait is quite common.[49] Resilience is the product of a large number of developmental processes over time that has allowed children who experience some sort of risk to continue to develop competently (while other children have not).[59]

Research on 'protective factors', which are characteristics of children or situations that particularly help children in the context of risk has helped developmental scientists to understand what matters most for resilient children. Two of these that have emerged repeatedly in studies of resilient children are good cognitive functioning (like cognitive self-regulation and IQ) and positive relationships (especially with competent adults, like parents).[60] Children who have protective factors in their lives tend to do better in some risky contexts when compared to children without protective factors in the same contexts. However, this is not a justification to expose any child to risk. Children do better when not exposed to high levels of risk or adversity.

Building in the classroom[edit]
Resilient children within classroom environments have been described as working and playing well and holding high expectations, have often been characterized using constructs such as locus of control, self-esteem, self-efficacy, and autonomy.[61] All of these things work together to prevent the debilitating behaviors that are associated with learned helplessness.

Role of the community[edit]
Communities play a huge role in fostering resilience. The clearest sign of a cohesive and supportive community is the presence of social organizations that provide healthy human development.[62] Services are unlikely to be used unless there is good communication concerning them. Children who are repeatedly relocated do not benefit from these resources, as their opportunities for resilience-building, meaningful community participation are removed with every relocation.[63]

Role of the family[edit]
Fostering resilience in children requires family environments that are caring and stable, hold high expectations for children’s behavior and encourage participation in the life of the family.[64] Most resilient children have a strong relationship with at least one adult, not always a parent, and this relationship helps to diminish risk associated with family discord. Even if found that even though divorce produces stress, the availability of social support from family and community can reduce stress and yield positive outcomes.[65] Any family that emphasizes the value of assigned chores, caring for brothers or sisters, and the contribution of part-time work in supporting the family helps to foster resilience.[12]

Families in poverty[edit]
Numerous studies have shown that some practices that poor parents utilize help promote resilience within families. These include frequent displays of warmth, affection, emotional support; reasonable expectations for children combined with straightforward, not overly harsh discipline; family routines and celebrations; and the maintenance of common values regarding money and leisure.[66] According to sociologist Christopher B. Doob, "Poor children growing up in resilient families have received significant support for doing well as they enter the social world—starting in daycare programs and then in schooling."[67]

Role of religion[edit]
Religion can have a positive effect on resilience in children. Children often find a sense of belonging, a strong community, and stability through various forms of organized religion. A religious setting can foster positive growth in multiple areas. This pattern is likely to be the result of many protective processes that take place inside a religious institution. For example, attending a church has been shown to increase a child’s social network, provide a feeling of cohesion and belonging in her community, even promote a sense of personal control and sense of social justice when threatened.[68]

Bullying[edit]
Main article: Bullying and emotional intelligence § Resilience
Beyond preventing bullying, it is also important to consider how interventions based on emotional intelligence(EI) are important in the case that bullying will occur. Increasing EI may be an important step in trying to foster resilience among victims. When a person faces stress and adversity, especially of a repetitive nature, their ability to adapt is an important factor in whether they have a more positive or negative outcome.[69] Resilient individuals are those who are considered to have positive developmental outcomes in light of their negative experiences, such as bullying. A 2013 study examined adolescents who illustrated resilience to bullying and found some interesting gendered differences, with higher behavioral resilience found among girls and higher emotional resilience found among boys. Despite these differences, they still implicated internal resources and negative emotionality in either encouraging or being negatively associated with resilience to bullying respectively and urged for the targeting of psychosocial skills as a form of intervention.[70] Emotional intelligence has been illustrated to promote resilience to stress[71] and as mentioned previously, the ability to manage stress and other negative emotions can be preventative of a victim going on to perpetuate aggression.[72] One factor that is important in resilience is the regulation of one’s own emotions.[69] Schneider et al. (2013) found that emotional perception was significant in facilitating lower negative emotionality during stress and Emotional Understanding facilitated resilience and has a positive correlation with positive affect.[71]
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We’ve been thinking about our taste buds all wrong

We’ve been thinking about our taste buds all wrong | educational implications | Scoop.it
That tongue map you were taught about in school? It's actually not true.
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"Despite the scientific evidence, the tongue map has burrowed its way into common knowledge and is still taught in many classrooms and textbooks today." (Excerpt )
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How America Became Exceptional

How America Became Exceptional | educational implications | Scoop.it
The truth is that America as an exceptional nation is not a birthright to gloat upon, but a legacy to be lived up to—and lately we’ve been failing miserably.
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4 Proven Tips to Make Learning Stick – An Infog...

4 Proven Tips to Make Learning Stick – An Infog... | educational implications | Scoop.it
“This infographic shares very useful tips to retain what we have learnt for a long time.”
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IBM's Latest Move Signals A New Era For Data

IBM's Latest Move Signals A New Era For Data | educational implications | Scoop.it
The data revolution will be like the PC revolution all over again. Except this time, instead of Microsoft, we basically have the equivalent of Linux—an open source, rather than a proprietary, operating system.
Sharrock's insight:
Satell is adept at explaining complex topics with a simple natrative. He is also great at analysis. If he's right, artificial intelligence and predictive analytics and other data-driven technologies, will get a boost from innovations. Machines, as well as companies, are going to get a great deal smarter.
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Memory Recall/Retrieval - Memory Processes - The Human Memory

Memory Recall/Retrieval - Memory Processes - The Human Memory | educational implications | Scoop.it
There are three main types of recall:

??? Did You Know ???
Several recent studies in the growing area of neuro-education have shown the value of the "testing effect" (or "retrieval effect"), where quizzes a short time after initial learning significantly improves subsequent retrieval of facts and ideas, as well as overall understanding of topics and the ability to solve related problems.
Testing helps protect against "proactive interference" (the familiar feeling of being overwhelmed by too much information), and the studies suggest that a quick test is much more effective than en extra hour of study or re-reading.
Free recall is the process in which a person is given a list of items to remember and then is asked to recall them in any order (hence the name “free”). This type of recall often displays evidence of either the primacy effect (when the person recalls items presented at the beginning of the list earlier and more often) or the recency effect (when the person recalls items presented at the end of the list earlier and more often), and also of the contiguity effect (the marked tendency for items from neighbouring positions in the list to be recalled successively).
Cued recall is the process in which a person is given a list of items to remember and is then tested with the use of cues or guides. When cues are provided to a person, they tend to remember items on the list that they did not originally recall without a cue, and which were thought to be lost to memory. This can also take the form of stimulus-response recall, as when words, pictures and numbers are presented together in a pair, and the resulting associations between the two items cues the recall of the second item in the pair.
Serial recall refers to our ability to recall items or events in the order in which they occurred, whether chronological events in our autobiographical memories, or the order of the different parts of a sentence (or phonemes in a word) in order to make sense of them. Serial recall in long-term memory appears to differ from serial recall in short-term memory, in that a sequence in long-term memory is represented in memory as a whole, rather than as a series of discrete items. Testing of serial recall by psychologists have yielded several general rules:
more recent events are more easily remembered in order (especially with auditory stimuli);
recall decreases as the length of the list or sequence increases;
there is a tendency to remember the correct items, but in the wrong order;
where errors are made, there is a tendency to respond with an item that resembles the original item in some way (e.g. “dog” instead of “fog”, or perhaps an item physically close to the original item);
repetition errors do occur, but they are relatively rare;
if an item is recalled earlier in the list than it should be, the missed item tends to be inserted immediately after it;
if an item from a previous trial is recalled in a current trial, it is likely to be recalled at its position from the original trial.
Sharrock's insight:

excedrpt: "The efficiency of memory recall can be increased to some extent by making inferences from our personal stockpile of world knowledge, and by our use of schema (plural: schemata). A schema is an organized mental structure or framework of pre-conceived ideas about the world and how it works, which we can use to make realistic inferences and assumptions about how to interpret and process information. Thus, our everyday communication consists not just of words and their meanings, but also of what is left out and mutually understood (e.g. if someone says “it is 3 o’clock”, our knowledge of the world usually allows us to know automatically whether it is 3am or 3pm). Such schemata are also applied to recalled memories, so that we can often flesh out details of a memory from just a skeleton memory of a central event or object. However, the use of schemata may also lead to memory errors as assumed or expected associated events are added that did not actually occur."

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Cheating found to be rife in British schools and universities

Cheating found to be rife in British schools and universities | educational implications | Scoop.it
Channel 4 Dispatches uncovers shady practices across the board, from rigged primary school key assessments to 40,000 university students disciplined for plagiarism
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The power of metaphor when thinking about crime

The power of metaphor when thinking about crime | educational implications | Scoop.it
Researchers wanting to understand how metaphors shape the way people think about things, have found that different metaphors don't just make people think of different solutions, but of which solution is best.

Via Tim Grant
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Tim Grant's curator insight, February 7, 2013 6:52 AM

One for fans of Vygotsky - the metaphor you use really does change the way you reason about crime and its causes and may lead you to differing conclusions.

 

And the full article can be found here:  http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0052961 … 

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Override: A story about the future of work

Override: A story about the future of work | educational implications | Scoop.it
It's the year 2025, and a technician called Joe is one of the few people who still has a job...
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Musical tastes offer a window into how you think

Musical tastes offer a window into how you think | educational implications | Scoop.it
Do you like your jazz to be Norah Jones or Ornette Coleman, your classical music to be Bach or Stravinsky, or your rock to be Coldplay or Slayer?
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We now have an economic theory that explains the reckless rock ‘n roll lifestyle

We now have an economic theory that explains the reckless rock ‘n roll lifestyle | educational implications | Scoop.it
Neil Young was right. Sometimes it's better to burn out than to fade away.
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Risk and Resilience Factors in Coping with Daily Stress in Adulthood: The Role of Age, Self-Concept Incoherence, and Personal Control

Risk and Resilience Factors in Coping with Daily Stress in Adulthood: The Role of Age, Self-Concept Incoherence, and Personal Control | educational implications | Scoop.it
We focused on SCI, as operationalized by an index of SCD, for several reasons. First, consistent with the notion that a person's self-concept is a cognitive structure with important self-regulatory functions (Baumeister, 1998; Higgins, 1996; Markus & Wurf, 1987), it has been shown that self-representations come into play when a person is confronted with life stress (Showers, Abramson, & Hogan, 1998). However, self-representations may fulfill their self-regulatory functions optimally only if they are coherently and integratively organized. For example, research has shown that self-structures in which self-representations are grouped exclusively into positive or negative groupings (i.e., compartmentalized self-structures) tend to be maladaptive, whereas self-structures in which positive and negative self-attributes are grouped together (i.e., integrated self-structures) tend to be associated with greater stability, increased resilience, and more adaptive ways of coping with stress (Showers et al.; Showers & Zeigler-Hill, 2007).
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The International Resilience Project: Findings from the Research and the Effectiveness of Interventions

The coalescing views entailed recognizing some traits and characteristics these resilient children had that were different from or not as frequently found in children who were not resilient. The traits were identified by different researchers and practitioners, but there was growing consensus on their identification. The International Resilience Project organized those traits into the following categories: External supports and resources, including trusting relationships; access to health, education, welfare and security services; emotional support outside the family; structure and rules at home; parental encouragement of autonomy; stable school environment; stable home environment; role models; and religious organizations (morality); Internal, personal strengths, including a sense of being lovable; autonomy; appealing temperament; achievement oriented; self-esteem; hope, faith, belief in God, morality, trust; empathy and altruism; and locus of control; Social, interpersonal skills, including creativity; persistence; humor; communication; problem solving; impulse control; seeking trusting relationships; social skills; and intellectual skills.
Sharrock's insight:

Such explorations and studies suggest that education, as complex as it is, is a public health concern, in addition to the issues of college and career readiness. 

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The Biology Of Race, Revisited

The Biology Of Race, Revisited | educational implications | Scoop.it
There's no doubt that different groups of people can look very different from one another. But to contemporary anthropologists and sociologists, the notion that there are distinct "races" Many biologists have replaced the term “race” with "continental ancestry." This is because such a large fraction of the world has ancestry in more than one continent. The result is hyphenated nomenclature, which attempts to specify which continents are represented in one's ancestry.
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Jon Stewart opts against jokes, calls Charleston shooting 'terrorist attack'

Jon Stewart opts against jokes, calls Charleston shooting 'terrorist attack' | educational implications | Scoop.it
theGRIO REPORT - Comedian and Daily Show host Jon Stewart could not find anything to joke about in the opening to Thursday night's show following the tragic shooting at a Charleston church...
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“That’s insanity. That’s racial wallpaper,” Stewart said. “You can’t allow that. Nine people were shot in a black church by a white guy who hated them, who wanted to start some sort of civil war. The Confederate flag flies over South Carolina, and the roads are named for Confederate generals. And the white guy’s the one who feels like his country’s being taken away from him.”

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Employers turn to resilience-building programs to cut worker stress | Business Insurance

Employers turn to resilience-building programs to cut worker stress | Business Insurance | educational implications | Scoop.it
Employers cutting worker #stress with #resilience programs @BusInsMagazine @shelbyliv5 http://t.co/JTkNrinBRC
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For Asian Americans, standardized testing is its own costly, hyper-competitive culture

For Asian Americans, standardized testing is its own costly, hyper-competitive culture | educational implications | Scoop.it
When we tell our kids that they must be “perfect,” we don’t give them the space to just be human.
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Metaphors and minds

Metaphors and minds | educational implications | Scoop.it

Elisabeth Camp: 'Metaphors pull together several different features: they presuppose, and often thereby promulgate, complex, open-ended perspectives. They compare one thing to another. They are (often) imagistically and emotionally loaded. And their main communicative point is not explicit. But literal speech can do each of these things too, and often more than one at once. It’s the combination that’s distinctive to metaphor'.


Via Luca Baptista
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