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CURIOSITY

join the many thousands who receive an extraordinary human being each Monday / http://soulbiographies.com/films/list/

Via Lisa Durff
Sharrock's insight:

Curiosity takes a great deal of time to address and feed though...or maybe it can be adequately fed with a list of resources at next class meeting or with a few key questions and a project assignment...

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Lisa Durff's curator insight, January 10, 2013 9:49 AM

@coolcatteacher: is showing this Seth Godin video to her students CURIOSITY http://t.co/j35kPZBe   #flatclass 

Sharrock's curator insight, January 22, 2013 3:04 PM

Something to think about when teaching. Curiosity takes a great deal of time to address and feed though...or maybe it can be adequately fed with a list of resources at next class meeting or with a few key questions and a project assignment...

educational implications
Theory and technology with possible impacts on how we learn
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Dissection of an Argument - Toolkit For Thinking

Dissection of an Argument - Toolkit For Thinking | educational implications | Scoop.it
Toolkit of ideas and techniques to help your creative and critical thinking including problem solving, logical fallacies and decision making.
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This resource may be of help for those in writing, education, and other fields where critical thinking is necessary for production and for producing value. Along with keeping rhetorical fallacies at hand. 

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The Neglected Link in the High-School-to-College Pipeline

The Neglected Link in the High-School-to-College Pipeline | educational implications | Scoop.it
The significance of counseling is under-recognized by the public. A recent national survey asked what, if taxes were raised to improve local public schools, the money should be spent on first. Just over a third of the respondents said teachers; supplies came next, followed by classes and extracurriculars, infrastructure, and new schools. Counselors came last, with just 6 percent of the sample. David Hawkins of the National Association of College Admissions Counselors identifies counseling as the third and most-neglected component of increasing access to college, alongside financial support and equitable access to a challenging school curriculum.
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Helping students find relevance

Helping students find relevance | educational implications | Scoop.it
Teaching the relevance of course content can help students develop into engaged, motivated and self-regulated learners.
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World Gone Backwards

World Gone Backwards | educational implications | Scoop.it

If we had to describe the last 50 years of economic history in one word, globalization would be high on the list. Thousands of small, independent economies around the world fused into one nearly seamless whole. The things we use every day – food, clothing, vehicles, furniture, electronic devices, even the materials that compose our homes – now come from far and wide. We don’t even notice. International trade over vast distances is now so normal that we forget it wasn’t always so.


Here’s how far globalization has gone: In cities and towns all over the United States, weekend farmers markets have sprung up, selling fruits and vegetables whose main attraction is that they are local. Eating food grown in your own region is now exotic and unusual. Our global diet served up at conventional grocery stores means our bodies and brains have been globalized, too.


Globalization ramped up slowly for a century or so before entering a new phase in the 1960s. I was born in 1964, so the explosion of the global economy roughly spans my lifetime. Mine is the first globalized generation. But if I reach 100, I suspect I will see children of a de-globalized generation.


That’s my theory: We are going full circle.

Sharrock's insight:
I am interested in the tensions resulting from the analog reality and digital (virtual, augmented, video realities). Robotics and drones as avatars and sensory-extensions, and the developing reactions to lagging and absence of sensory information due to use of interface technologies--language translation, vr, ar, lags, etc. Even as internet/computer technologies (ICTs) grow faster and more versatile, the differences between analog and digital sensory inputs and processing will become a growing issue. People will use these technologies as sensory extensions more often. Just like every other tech development, there will be impacts in the SPRITE spectra--social, political, religious, intellectual, technological, and educational/economical. 
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An Intro to Staging: Why It's Worthwhile and How to Make it Happen

Franky Marshall, spirits educator and world-traveling bartender, decided in 2011 it was time to challenge herself. She took an interest in “molecular mixology,” and sought to learn more about it at London’s 69 Colebrooke Row, where bartenders were using culinary techniques to create flavors and distillates.
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The illusion of attention

The illusion of attention | educational implications | Scoop.it

“Perceptual load corresponds to the amount of information that needs to be processed in a task,” Lavie explains, “and the extent to which processing the task information fills up the senses. It corresponds roughly to task difficulty, because a more difficult task is likely to load more on the senses.” This may not always be the case, however: “You may be engaged in a computerised task that is not too difficult but loads up your vision with many different visuals on the screen.”

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Appreciative inquiry - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Appreciative inquiry

Appreciative inquiry ( AI) is a model that seeks to engage stakeholders in self-determined change. According to Bushe "AI revolutionized the field of organization development and was a precursor to the rise of positive organization studies and the strengths based movement in American management."

Appreciative inquiry (AI) is a model that seeks to engage stakeholders in self-determined change. According to Bushe "AI revolutionized the field of organization development and was a precursor to the rise of positive organization studies and the strengths based movement in American management."[1] It was developed at Case Western Reserve University's department of organizational behavior, starting with a 1987 article by David Cooperrider and Suresh Srivastva. They felt that the overuse of "problem solving" hampered any kind of social improvement, and what was needed were new methods of inquiry that would help generate new ideas and models for how to organize.[2
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Should Students Memorize Facts or Assume They Will Always Be a Click Away?

Should Students Memorize Facts or Assume They Will Always Be a Click Away? | educational implications | Scoop.it
A young doctor-in-training examines a new patient. Should she draw information for the diagnosis from her “E-memory”—electronic memory, the kind that’
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Get Started with OCW | MIT OpenCourseWare | Free Online Course Materials

Get Started with OCW | MIT OpenCourseWare | Free Online Course Materials | educational implications | Scoop.it
Get Started with OCW
“The idea is simple: to publish all of our course materials online and make them widely available to everyone.” — Dick K.P. Yue, Professor, MIT School of Engineering

Whether you’re a student, a teacher, or simply a curious person that wants to learn, you'll find a wealth of insight and inspiration in MIT OpenCourseWare.

What is OCW?

OCW is a free and open publication of material from thousands of MIT courses, covering the entire MIT curriculum. That's every MIT department and degree program, and ranging from the introductory to the most advanced graduate level. Each OCW course includes a syllabus, some instructional material (such as lecture notes or a reading list), and some learning activities (such as assignments or exams). Many courses also have complete video lectures, free online textbooks, and faculty teaching insights. While some OCW content is custom-created for online use, most of it comes straight from the MIT classroom.

How do I use OCW?

There's no signup, no enrollment, and no start or end dates. The entire OCW collection is always here for you. Freely browse and use it at your own pace.

Knowledge is your reward. We don't offer credit or certificates for using OCW. Instead, use OCW to guide your own life-long learning, or use OCW to teach others.

OCW is made for sharing. Download and save files and complete courses for later. Send them to friends and colleagues. Modify or remix OCW content for any non-commercial use (just remember to credit OCW as the source). It's all good, per the terms of our Creative Commons license.
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Cottage Industry

Cottage Industry | educational implications | Scoop.it
Cottage Industry is a specialized form of small scale industry where the production of the commodity takes place in the homes and the labor is supplied by the family members only. The machineries or means utilized for the production of the commodities generally are the common ones used at homes. The basic characteristic feature of Cottage Industry is that it is basically unorganized in nature and come under the group of small scale industry type.
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Obama Administration Announces New Regulations to Strengthen Employment and Training Opportunities for Millions of Americans | U.S. Department of Education

Obama Administration Announces New Regulations to Strengthen Employment and Training Opportunities for Millions of Americans | U.S. Department of Education | educational implications | Scoop.it
The U.S. Departments of Labor and Education today made publicly available the final rules to implement the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), an historic expansion of opportunity for the nation's job seekers, workers and employers. The regulations deliver on need to modernize the nation's workforce system and represent a more integrated, job-driven approach to support communities and expand job growth.

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Data Mining Reveals the Crucial Factors That Determine When People Make Blunders

Data Mining Reveals the Crucial Factors That Determine When People Make Blunders | educational implications | Scoop.it
Decision making is influenced by the complexity of the situation, the skill of the decision maker, and the time pressure. But one of these is much more important than the others, a new study reveals.
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The Next Evolution in Thinking

The Next Evolution in Thinking | educational implications | Scoop.it
Everything in our world is becoming more complex. From (smart)phones to home appliances, job responsibilities to parenting. Or maybe it’s that our frame of reference is larger than it’s ever been:
Sharrock's insight:
(Excerpt) "When I start to acknowledge that problems are complex, changing, unintuitive and involve multiple interests, it becomes clear that there is no “one” solution, and changing a system is a collective effort"
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The Robots We've Long Imagined Are Finally Here

The Robots We've Long Imagined Are Finally Here | educational implications | Scoop.it
The idea of the robot—a thing animated and moving on its own volition—dates back as far as Greek literature, according to the online Encyclopedia of Science Fiction. In Homer's Iliad, for instance, the demigod Hephaestus fabricates three-legged creatures capable of attending to the gods. The word “robot” itself is much younger; it came into use about 95 years ago with the premiere of a science fiction play by Czech writer Karel Čapek.
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How Do You Bounce Back from Setbacks?

How Do You Bounce Back from Setbacks? | educational implications | Scoop.it
Check out these ideas and tools for bouncing back and building resilience that are useful for both adults and children.
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'Robot' Babies Could Increase Teen Pregnancies

'Robot' Babies Could Increase Teen Pregnancies | educational implications | Scoop.it
The devices - which need feeding and changing - did not have the desired effect, with pregnancy rates emerging higher than normal.
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Ghosts of White People Past: Witnessing White Flight From an Asian Ethnoburb – Pacific Standard

Ghosts of White People Past: Witnessing White Flight From an Asian Ethnoburb – Pacific Standard | educational implications | Scoop.it
If diversity is so important to liberal whites, why do they keep fleeing ethnically diverse suburbia?
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I learned a few new terms.
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Deirdre Barrett - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Deirdre Barrett - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Deirdre Barrett, Ph.D. is an author and psychologist who teaches at Harvard Medical School. She is known for her research on dreams, hypnosis and imagery and has written on evolutionary psychology. Barrett is a Past President of The International Association for the Study of Dreams and of the American Psychological Association's Div.

Barrett’s studies of hypnosis have focused on different types of high hypnotizables, finding two subgroups which she terms fantasizers and dissociaters. Fantasizers are people who have vivid imaginations, find it easy to block out real-world stimuli, spend much time daydreaming, report imaginary companions as a child and grew up with parents who encouraged imaginary play. Dissociaters usually had a history of childhood abuse or other significant trauma, had learned to escape into numbness, and to forget unpleasant events. Their association to “daydreaming” was often going blank rather than vividly recalled fantasies. Both score equally high on formal scales of hypnotic susceptibility.[28][29][30]

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Why Do the Poor Make Such Poor Decisions? — Utopia for Realists

Why Do the Poor Make Such Poor Decisions? — Utopia for Realists | educational implications | Scoop.it
Our efforts to combat poverty are often based on a misconception: that the poor must pull themselves up out of the mire. But a…
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Peter Pan and Wendy: how J M Barrie understood and demonstrated keys aspects of cognition

Peter Pan and Wendy: how J M Barrie understood and demonstrated keys aspects of cognition | educational implications | Scoop.it
In Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens, J M Barrie describes a moment when a young girl, seeking to comfort a tearful Peter, gives him her handkerchief. But he doesn’t know what to do with it.
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Academics shun books in favour of journal articles

Academics shun books in favour of journal articles | educational implications | Scoop.it
Shift may be evidence that researchers feel they are increasingly judged on citations and journal impact factors
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The myth of millennial entitlement was created to hide their parents’ mistakes

The myth of millennial entitlement was created to hide their parents’ mistakes | educational implications | Scoop.it
Three years ago, TIME magazine published a cover story called “The Me Me Me Generation—Millennials are lazy, entitled narcissists who still live with their parents.” It was the print version of clickbait, designed to be devoured by TIME’s Baby Boomer... The shared experience of Americans who struggled as young adults in the aftermath of the Great Recession is played down in favor of trend pieces on the affectations of privileged youth or the phenomenon of “side hustles.” Analysts puzzle over why young Americans forgo things like banks and marriage and houses, and come up with answers like “preference for urban locations with lots of entertainment and lifestyle choices.”
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12 New Job Hunt Strategies That'll Re-Energize Your Search

12 New Job Hunt Strategies That'll Re-Energize Your Search | educational implications | Scoop.it
You may think you've exhausted the job search, especially if it's been a struggle, but 12 career coach experts offer tips for the strategy you're overlooking.
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Tim Robbins Has Prison Drama Class That Cuts Recidivism in Half - Good News Network

Tim Robbins Has Prison Drama Class That Cuts Recidivism in Half - Good News Network | educational implications | Scoop.it
Not only has it been credited with cutting the recidivism rate in half among inmates who’ve participated, a study in December shows The Actors’ Gang has reduced fights in prisons by 89% among inmates in the program.

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Technology and the death of civilisation

Technology and the death of civilisation | educational implications | Scoop.it
It is a failing of human nature to detest anything that young people do just because older people are not used to it or have trouble… "Late last year this photograph of children looking at their smartphones by Rembrandt’s ‘The Night Watch’ in the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam started doing the rounds on the web. It quickly became viral. It was often accompanied by outraged, dispirited comments such as “a perfect metaphor for our age”, “the end of civilisation” or “a sad picture of our society”. Only they weren’t. It turns out that the Rijksmuseum has an app that, among other things, contains guided tours and further information about the works on display. As part of their visit to the museum, the children, who minutes earlier had admired the art and listened attentively to explanations by expert adults, had been instructed to complete an assignment by their school teachers, using, among other things, the museum’s excellent smartphone app. I would like to think that all those who liked, posted, shared and tweeted the picture of children on smartphones by Rembrandt’s masterpiece in the erroneous belief that it illustrated everything that is wrong with society feel a tiny bit silly and a little more humble as a consequence. But it won’t happen. The tragic thing is that this — the truth — will never go viral. So, I wonder, what is more likely to bring about the death of civilisation, children using smartphones to learn about art or the wilful ignorance of adults who are too quick to make assumptions?" Technology and the death of civilisation http://buff.ly/1VxAtfF
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