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The Firefox Phone Is Real And You Can Get One Next Month

The Firefox Phone Is Real And You Can Get One Next Month | educational implications | Scoop.it
Another alternative to iPhone and Android.

Via Lisa Durff
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Competition is good!

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Sharrock's curator insight, January 22, 2013 12:29 PM

compeition is good!

educational implications
Theory and technology with possible impacts on how we learn
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Dissection of an Argument - Toolkit For Thinking

Dissection of an Argument - Toolkit For Thinking | educational implications | Scoop.it
Toolkit of ideas and techniques to help your creative and critical thinking including problem solving, logical fallacies and decision making.
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This resource may be of help for those in writing, education, and other fields where critical thinking is necessary for production and for producing value. Along with keeping rhetorical fallacies at hand. 

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Get Started with OCW | MIT OpenCourseWare | Free Online Course Materials

Get Started with OCW | MIT OpenCourseWare | Free Online Course Materials | educational implications | Scoop.it
Get Started with OCW
“The idea is simple: to publish all of our course materials online and make them widely available to everyone.” — Dick K.P. Yue, Professor, MIT School of Engineering

Whether you’re a student, a teacher, or simply a curious person that wants to learn, you'll find a wealth of insight and inspiration in MIT OpenCourseWare.

What is OCW?

OCW is a free and open publication of material from thousands of MIT courses, covering the entire MIT curriculum. That's every MIT department and degree program, and ranging from the introductory to the most advanced graduate level. Each OCW course includes a syllabus, some instructional material (such as lecture notes or a reading list), and some learning activities (such as assignments or exams). Many courses also have complete video lectures, free online textbooks, and faculty teaching insights. While some OCW content is custom-created for online use, most of it comes straight from the MIT classroom.

How do I use OCW?

There's no signup, no enrollment, and no start or end dates. The entire OCW collection is always here for you. Freely browse and use it at your own pace.

Knowledge is your reward. We don't offer credit or certificates for using OCW. Instead, use OCW to guide your own life-long learning, or use OCW to teach others.

OCW is made for sharing. Download and save files and complete courses for later. Send them to friends and colleagues. Modify or remix OCW content for any non-commercial use (just remember to credit OCW as the source). It's all good, per the terms of our Creative Commons license.
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Cottage Industry

Cottage Industry | educational implications | Scoop.it
Cottage Industry is a specialized form of small scale industry where the production of the commodity takes place in the homes and the labor is supplied by the family members only. The machineries or means utilized for the production of the commodities generally are the common ones used at homes. The basic characteristic feature of Cottage Industry is that it is basically unorganized in nature and come under the group of small scale industry type.
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Obama Administration Announces New Regulations to Strengthen Employment and Training Opportunities for Millions of Americans | U.S. Department of Education

Obama Administration Announces New Regulations to Strengthen Employment and Training Opportunities for Millions of Americans | U.S. Department of Education | educational implications | Scoop.it
The U.S. Departments of Labor and Education today made publicly available the final rules to implement the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), an historic expansion of opportunity for the nation's job seekers, workers and employers. The regulations deliver on need to modernize the nation's workforce system and represent a more integrated, job-driven approach to support communities and expand job growth.

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Data Mining Reveals the Crucial Factors That Determine When People Make Blunders

Data Mining Reveals the Crucial Factors That Determine When People Make Blunders | educational implications | Scoop.it
Decision making is influenced by the complexity of the situation, the skill of the decision maker, and the time pressure. But one of these is much more important than the others, a new study reveals.
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The Next Evolution in Thinking

The Next Evolution in Thinking | educational implications | Scoop.it
Everything in our world is becoming more complex. From (smart)phones to home appliances, job responsibilities to parenting. Or maybe it’s that our frame of reference is larger than it’s ever been:
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(Excerpt) "When I start to acknowledge that problems are complex, changing, unintuitive and involve multiple interests, it becomes clear that there is no “one” solution, and changing a system is a collective effort"
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Big Brains, Small Minds

Big Brains, Small Minds | educational implications | Scoop.it

If we treat the contemplation of the best life as a luxury we cannot afford, seemingly urgent matters will crowd out the truly important ones.

"If the aim of education is to gain money and power, where can we turn for help in knowing what to do with that money and power? Plato knew this firsthand. He had watched as ambition, tied to technological superiority, had led his fellow Athenians to engage in a number of poorly conceived military campaigns, the last of which had allowed the Spartans to lay siege to Athens. In the face of such a ruthless foe, Athens did what any wealthy democracy would do: It built a wall around itself. Some of the walls of the Peloponnesian War are still visible, hastily built out of whatever the Athenians could lay hands on — the remnants of roofs and doorposts — suggesting that some buildings were torn down to make them. That is instructive, if not cautionary. It is often the case that in our attempts to guard ourselves we destroy the very things that we long to protect. Identifying and negotiating these paradoxes is the stuff of a liberal-arts education."

Sharrock's insight:
I find that the same argument can be made about dogmatic atheists rejecting religious knowledge. There is a wealth of information available concerning dignity, happiness, meaningful living, ethics and morality (to name just a few). A lot of heavy lifting has already been done. Combining these ideas with religiously-motivated philosophy may advance our understanding of dignity which drives many discussions about rights and culture-building. 
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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, May 16, 10:01 AM
The article blends Plato and Aristotle. Education is a much broader concept than schooling and school is merely one component. To ask questions in ways that open conversations up and keep them open is a key to all forms of education, including school.
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High School of the Future: Cutting-edge model capitalizes on blended learning to take personalization further

High School of the Future: Cutting-edge model capitalizes on blended learning to take personalization further | educational implications | Scoop.it
Cutting-edge model capitalizes on blended learning to take personalization further
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The specialist–generalist continuum

The specialist–generalist continuum | educational implications | Scoop.it
In The Neo-Generalist, Kenneth Mikkelsen and I explore how those with preferences for the WWW curve of the continuum nevertheless find themselves practising all over the map, responding and adapting to context. We illustrate our argument with stories drawn from interviewees, historical figures, business, activism, science, sport, the military, art and popular culture. We even delve into our personal experiences to explore how they correspond to the continuum. Here is my learning–working story distilled
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Solving the Special Education Crisis through Onlin https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/solving-special-education-crisis-through-online-speech-julie-george

More than 13 percent of America’s school-aged population—more than six million children—require special education today according to the National Center for Education Statistics. Given this challenge, compounded by a nationwide shortage of special education teachers and related services clinicians, schools struggle to provide the federally mandated services these students need to progress academically.
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Researchers found a better way to learn a new skill

Researchers found a better way to learn a new skill | educational implications | Scoop.it
What’s the best way to learn a new skill, such as playing the guitar? Multiple hours spent doing the same task over and over is thought to be the optimal strategy – practice makes perfect, as many would say. The secret lies in the six-hour gap between training sessions that the groups were given. The memory of their new skill is “consolidated” within the brain during this time period, wherein the neural connections in the brain form and “preserve” the memory. With this memory consolidated, the volunteers could reactivate it during the second training session in order to perform the task with increased ease.
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Characters from novels can influence real-life behaviour » MobyLives

Characters from novels can influence real-life behaviour » MobyLives | educational implications | Scoop.it
It’s a phenomenon known as ‘experience-taking’, an unconscious process in which we identify with characters to the point of mentally merging our own identities with theirs. That’s as opposed to the less extreme ‘perspective-taking’, ‘where people try to understand what another person is going though in a particular situation’ — or empathy, the development of which has long been held to be one of the fruits of reading.
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The proof of the pudding: A series of applied tests on embodied cognition

The proof of the pudding: A series of applied tests on embodied cognition | educational implications | Scoop.it
Embodied cognition refers to the idea that our thinking is shaped by our corporeal nature (Glenberg et al. 2013). Many thus believe that our understanding of even high-level, abstract concepts is grounded in our more concrete bodily experiences (Meier et al. 2012), and that commonly-used metaphors accurately represent these abstract-concrete connections. For example, we often describe an emotionally close relationship as warm and an emotionally distant one as cold. And, in fact, research has shown that social exclusion leads people to estimate their surroundings as a couple of degrees colder (Zhong & Leonardelli 2008) and even causes actual drops in body temperature (IJzerman et al. 2012). This relationship also seems to work in reverse.
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Academics shun books in favour of journal articles

Academics shun books in favour of journal articles | educational implications | Scoop.it
Shift may be evidence that researchers feel they are increasingly judged on citations and journal impact factors
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The myth of millennial entitlement was created to hide their parents’ mistakes

The myth of millennial entitlement was created to hide their parents’ mistakes | educational implications | Scoop.it
Three years ago, TIME magazine published a cover story called “The Me Me Me Generation—Millennials are lazy, entitled narcissists who still live with their parents.” It was the print version of clickbait, designed to be devoured by TIME’s Baby Boomer... The shared experience of Americans who struggled as young adults in the aftermath of the Great Recession is played down in favor of trend pieces on the affectations of privileged youth or the phenomenon of “side hustles.” Analysts puzzle over why young Americans forgo things like banks and marriage and houses, and come up with answers like “preference for urban locations with lots of entertainment and lifestyle choices.”
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12 New Job Hunt Strategies That'll Re-Energize Your Search

12 New Job Hunt Strategies That'll Re-Energize Your Search | educational implications | Scoop.it
You may think you've exhausted the job search, especially if it's been a struggle, but 12 career coach experts offer tips for the strategy you're overlooking.
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Tim Robbins Has Prison Drama Class That Cuts Recidivism in Half - Good News Network

Tim Robbins Has Prison Drama Class That Cuts Recidivism in Half - Good News Network | educational implications | Scoop.it
Not only has it been credited with cutting the recidivism rate in half among inmates who’ve participated, a study in December shows The Actors’ Gang has reduced fights in prisons by 89% among inmates in the program.

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Technology and the death of civilisation

Technology and the death of civilisation | educational implications | Scoop.it
It is a failing of human nature to detest anything that young people do just because older people are not used to it or have trouble… "Late last year this photograph of children looking at their smartphones by Rembrandt’s ‘The Night Watch’ in the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam started doing the rounds on the web. It quickly became viral. It was often accompanied by outraged, dispirited comments such as “a perfect metaphor for our age”, “the end of civilisation” or “a sad picture of our society”. Only they weren’t. It turns out that the Rijksmuseum has an app that, among other things, contains guided tours and further information about the works on display. As part of their visit to the museum, the children, who minutes earlier had admired the art and listened attentively to explanations by expert adults, had been instructed to complete an assignment by their school teachers, using, among other things, the museum’s excellent smartphone app. I would like to think that all those who liked, posted, shared and tweeted the picture of children on smartphones by Rembrandt’s masterpiece in the erroneous belief that it illustrated everything that is wrong with society feel a tiny bit silly and a little more humble as a consequence. But it won’t happen. The tragic thing is that this — the truth — will never go viral. So, I wonder, what is more likely to bring about the death of civilisation, children using smartphones to learn about art or the wilful ignorance of adults who are too quick to make assumptions?" Technology and the death of civilisation http://buff.ly/1VxAtfF
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Quality Homework: A Smart Idea

Quality Homework: A Smart Idea | educational implications | Scoop.it
We ought to be asking a different question altogether. What should matter to parents and educators is this: How effectively do children’s after-school assignments advance learning?
Sharrock's insight:
This is an important reframe and research into the homework question. As usual, it's not an either/or question; it's a what works question.
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Why do university-managed blogs matter? On the importance of public, open and networked digital infrastructure.

Why do university-managed blogs matter? On the importance of public, open and networked digital infrastructure. | educational implications | Scoop.it
Academic blogging is increasingly valued by academics and institutions as a worthwhile activity. But universities are still struggling to provide the right balance of infrastructure and services to…
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Turn screen time into learning time

Turn screen time into learning time | educational implications | Scoop.it
Screen time gets a bad rap, but laptops, tablets and phones offer many ways for students to create, solve problems, collaborate and meet the ISTE Standards for Students.
Sharrock's insight:
excerpt: "Screen time gets more bad press than a Hollywood star in rehab. But the fact is, not all screen time is the same. Screen time is like food: some of it’s bad for you and some of it’s good for you, and moderation is key. "It’s not the screen but what you do with it that matters."
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Why smart people are better off with fewer friends

Why smart people are better off with fewer friends | educational implications | Scoop.it
"The findings in here suggest (and it is no surprise) that those with more intelligence and the capacity to use it ... are less likely to spend so much time socializing because they are focused on some other longer term objective."
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Believable Fictions: On the Nature of Emotional Responses to Fictional Characters – Howard Sklar – Helsinki English Studies: Electronic Journal

Believable Fictions: On the Nature of Emotional Responses to Fictional Characters – Howard Sklar – Helsinki English Studies: Electronic Journal | educational implications | Scoop.it
In this essay, I address the long-standing debate within aesthetic philosophy on the nature of readers’ emotional responses to fictional characters.  After reviewing some theories that regard fiction-generated emotions as considerably different from emotions that we experience in our everyday lives, I elaborate my own view that we bring many of the same intuitions and forms of evaluation to our encounters with fictional characters that we use with real people.  With this in mind, I attempt to show that our emotional responses to fictional characters more greatly resemble real-life emotions than some aesthetic theorists would like to concede.
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The Myth of Failure - Case Foundation

The Myth of Failure - Case Foundation | educational implications | Scoop.it
In our fourth Myth of the Entrepreneur series, we discuss how to ensure that failure doesn’t close the doors on entrepreneurs from particular backgrounds. "what about the downside of failure? Failure deeply affects the lives of the entire team, investors, vendors and customers. When a business goes under there are real, live people who lose their employment, families that lose their seed stage investing and entrepreneurs who can be left with overwhelming debt." (Excerpt)
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If Adults Forget So Much of What They Learned in School, What’s the Point?

If Adults Forget So Much of What They Learned in School, What’s the Point? | educational implications | Scoop.it
Adults remember more of what they learned in school than they think they do—thanks to an aspect of education that doesn’t get much attention in policy debates.
Sharrock's insight:
(excerpt) "Researchers have long known that going to school boosts IQ. The question is whether it makes people smarter by building mental horsepower, by adding to students’ database of knowledge and skills, or some of each component."
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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, February 25, 1:07 PM

What we should try remembering is how we felt in the experiences we had as students. Curriculum is an autobiographical making sense of what we learn and teach. It is not a free-for-all, but the planned curriculum filters through the lived experiences of teachers.