educational implications
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educational implications
Theory and technology with possible impacts on how we learn
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Dissection of an Argument - Toolkit For Thinking

Dissection of an Argument - Toolkit For Thinking | educational implications | Scoop.it
Toolkit of ideas and techniques to help your creative and critical thinking including problem solving, logical fallacies and decision making.
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This resource may be of help for those in writing, education, and other fields where critical thinking is necessary for production and for producing value. Along with keeping rhetorical fallacies at hand. 

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Trapper Keeper Legacy: Why They Became Contraband In Schools

The Trapper Keeper is one of the most famous school tools ever created, but annoyed teachers and tiny lockers have kept them out of kids' hands for years.
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How Big Data Traps People in Poverty

How Big Data Traps People in Poverty | educational implications | Scoop.it
Surveillance and public-benefits programs gather large amounts of information on low-income people, feeding opaque algorithms that can trap them in poverty.
Via Gebeyehu B. Amha
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Metric Tide - Higher Education Funding Council for England

The main findings of the review include the following: 

There is considerable scepticism among researchers, universities, representative bodies and learned societies about the broader use of metrics in research assessment and management.
Peer review, despite its flaws, continues to command widespread support as the primary basis for evaluating research outputs, proposals and individuals. However, a significant minority are enthusiastic about greater use of metrics, provided appropriate care is taken.
Carefully selected indicators can complement decision-making, but a ‘variable geometry’ of expert judgement, quantitative indicators and qualitative measures that respect research diversity will be required.
There is legitimate concern that some indicators can be misused or ‘gamed’: journal impact factors, university rankings and citation counts being three prominent examples.
The data infrastructure that underpins the use of metrics and information about research remains fragmented, with insufficient interoperability between systems.
Analysis concluded that that no metric can currently provide a like-for-like replacement for REF peer review.
In assessing research outputs in the REF, it is not currently feasible to assess research outputs or impacts in the REF using quantitative indicators alone.
In assessing impact in the REF, it is not currently feasible to use quantitative indicators in place of narrative case studies. However, there is scope to enhance the use of data in assessing research environments. 
The review identified 20 recommendations for further work and action by stakeholders across the UK research system.
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The 2017 Criminal Justice Reform Act

The 2017 Criminal Justice Reform Act | educational implications | Scoop.it
Governor Andrew M. Cuomo today unveiled the 6th signature proposal of his 2017 agenda: delivering comprehensive criminal justice reform to fix the broken front end of the criminal justice system. The xxx reform package will lead the nation by working to address the root causes of poverty, crime and incarceration that trap too many New Yorkers and weaken our families and communities. New York will begin by reforming our state’s antiquated bail system to take into account the threat a defendant poses to public safety when making bail and release decisions. The state will also increase the number of judges, adding 30 statewide to hear criminal matters, as well as develop and formalize an effective administration approach to ensure New Yorkers constitutional right to a speedy trial.

Via Community Village Sites
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The neuroscience of inequality: does poverty show up in children's brains?

The neuroscience of inequality: does poverty show up in children's brains? | educational implications | Scoop.it

Poverty is getting established as a health issue, impacting brain development, not just performance in education. What’s more, the data indicated that small increases in family income had a much larger impact on the brains of the poorest children than similar increases among wealthier children. And Noble’s data also suggested that when a family falls below a certain basic level of income, brain growth drops off precipitously. Children from families making less than $25,000 suffered the most, with 6% less brain surface area than peers in families making $150,000 or more.

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What if jobs are not the solution but the problem? – James Livingston | Aeon Essays

What if jobs are not the solution but the problem? – James Livingston | Aeon Essays | educational implications | Scoop.it
the Oxford economists who study employment trends tell us that almost half of existing jobs, including those involving ‘non-routine cognitive tasks’ – you know, like thinking – are at risk of death by computerisation within 20 years. They’re elaborating on conclusions reached by two MIT economists in the book Race Against the Machine (2011). Meanwhile, the Silicon Valley types who give TED talks have started speaking of ‘surplus humans’ as a result of the same process – cybernated production. Rise of the Robots, a new book that cites these very sources, is social science, not science fiction.
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The Differences between Happiness and Meaning in Life

The Differences between Happiness and Meaning in Life | educational implications | Scoop.it

In recent years, a number of studies have further supported the differences between happiness and meaning. In one clever study, Baumeister and colleagues found that factors such as feeling connected to others, feeling productive, and not being alone or bored contributed to both happiness and meaning. However, they also found some important differences:

Finding one’s life easy or difficult was related to happiness, but not meaning.


Feeling healthy was related to happiness, but not meaning.


Feeling good was related to happiness, not meaning.


Scarcity of money reduced happiness more than meaning.


People with more meaningful lives agreed that ‘relationships are more important than achievements’.


Helping people in need was linked to meaning but not happiness.
Expecting to do a lot of deep thinking was positively related to meaningfulness, but negatively with happiness.*


Happiness was related more to being a taker rather than a giver, whereas meaning was related more to being a giver than a taker.


The more people felt their activities were consistent with core themes and values of their self, the greater meaning they reported in their activities.


Seeing oneself as wise, creative, and even anxious were all linked to meaning but had no relationship (and in some cases, even showed a negative relationship) to happiness.

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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, July 7, 12:00 PM
Happiness and meaning in life can be intertwined, but it is not necessarily so. To find meaning in a concentration camp in WWII as Frankl did does not mean we are happy with our lot. I find meaning in teaching. It does not mean I am always happy.
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Learning by Writing Fiction

Learning by Writing Fiction | educational implications | Scoop.it
Imagining another person’s internal life; inhabiting the mental world of someone whose views oppose yours; articulating a conflict from multiple viewpoints; considering the agendas of people creating narratives. To what job or field of learning would these skills not be relevant? Writing stories develops these abilities, whether one is writing a science fiction tale or a love story, whether one is studying in an academic program or learning how to write on one’s own. The idea that fiction-writing is personal and self-indulgent comes from the fallacy that writing means withdrawing from life. On the contrary, writing fiction means embracing the world: rethinking one’s experiences, imagining other people’s experiences, and reaching toward what is not yet imaginable. I would urge anyone who has ever wanted to write to get started and ignore any talk of guilt. Some would argue that this will flood the world with bad fiction, but they may also fear the astounding writing that will emerge. Widespread writing could create teachers, doctors, business-owners, and designers who are better observers and better listeners. The failed writer isn’t the one who can’t get published; it’s the one who has always wanted to write but never tried.

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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, July 6, 1:26 PM
"Widespread writing could create teachers, doctors, business-owners, and designers who are better observers and better listeners"
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8 Reasons For Teaching Kindness in Schools | Education Articles

8 Reasons For Teaching Kindness in Schools | Education Articles | educational implications | Scoop.it
Scientific studies have shown that kindness has a great number of physical and emotional benefits, and that children require a healthy dose of the warm and fuzzies in order to flourish as health, happy, well-rounded individuals.

Patty O’Grady, PhD, is an expert in the area of neuroscience, emotional learning, and positive psychology with special attention to the educational arena. She believes that “kindness changes the brain by the experience of kindness. Children and adolescents do not learn kindness by only thinking about it and talking about it. Kindness is best learned by feeling it so that they can reproduce it. Kindness is an emotion that students feel and empathy is a strength that they share.”

A great number of benefits have been reported to support the theory of teaching kindness in schools
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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, July 3, 12:52 PM
Teaching kindness is more than words. It is actions and showing the words mean more than just what is said. Kindness is not prescribed. It is performed. Kindness does have many benefits i.e. acceptance, reduced depression, less bullying, etc.
CCM Consultancy's curator insight, July 6, 1:34 AM

"Being kind produces endorphins that activate areas of the brain that are associated with pleasure, social connection and trust, and it’s proven that these feelings of joyfulness are contagious, encouraging more collaboration and consequently achievement"

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Learning Archives | Farnam Street

Learning Archives | Farnam Street | educational implications | Scoop.it
When mastering a subject, our brains actually use different types of processing. Barbara Oakley explains in A Mind for Numbers: How to Excel at Math and Science (even if you flunked algebra) that our brain has two general modes of thinking – ‘focused’ and ‘diffuse’ – and both of these are valuable and required in the learning process.

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An Introduction to Feedback Loops

An Introduction to Feedback Loops | educational implications | Scoop.it
Feedback loops are created when reactions affect themselves and can be positive or negative.

Consider a thermostat regulating room temperature. This is an example of a negative feedback loop. As the temperature rises, the thermostat turns off the furnace allowing the room to rest at a predetermined temperature. When the temperature falls below that predetermined temperature the furnace reignites to return the room to its equilibrium state.
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From White Canes To Indoor Nav: A Modern History of Assistive Technology for the Blind

From White Canes To Indoor Nav: A Modern History of Assistive Technology for the Blind | educational implications | Scoop.it

Every life is defined by the unique set of challenges one must overcome, and blind folks — just like their sighted peers — often need some assistance when it comes to conquering the obstacles life throws their way. 


To the layman, as so much of our lives have become contained within a screen, the technological revolution of the past few decades would seem disastrous for the blind community, but in many respects the opposite is true. As technology has advanced so has assistive technology — devices and innovations that make the world more accessible for the disabled, and most importantly, allow them to live more independently. 


Assistive technology began with answering the most basic needs of the blind using computers by translating what was on a computer screen into audio, but has evolved into one of the most exciting areas of technological innovation today. Innovations in assistive technology have not always come cheap though. While some people can access assistive devices for free with government aid, customers paying retail can expect to hand over a hefty sum.

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The Architecture of Segregation

The Architecture of Segregation | educational implications | Scoop.it
Fifty years after the creation of the Department of Housing and Urban Development — and nearly that long after the passage of the Fair Housing Act of 1968 — the fight against the interlinked scourges of housing discrimination and racial segregation in America is far from finished. Economic isolation is actually growing worse across the country, as more and more minority families find themselves trapped in high-poverty neighborhoods without decent housing, schools or jobs, and with few avenues of escape.

This did not happen by accident. It is a direct consequence of federal, state and local housing policies that encourage — indeed, subsidize — racial and economic segregation. Fair housing advocates have recently been encouraged by a Supreme Court decision and new federal rules they see as favorable to their cause. Even so, there will be no fundamental change without the dismantling of policies that isolate the poor and that Paul Jargowsky, a professor of public policy at Rutgers University-Camden, and others call the “architecture of segregation.”

Via Jocelyn Stoller
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The psychological poverty trap

The psychological poverty trap | educational implications | Scoop.it
The poor aren't less able, they're distracted, says poverty expert Eldar Shafir. Privileged people subjected to the same conditions would also make bad decisions. (#Poverty and #psychology. Good article.

Via Pat G
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Failing Still to Address Poverty Directly: Growth Mindset as Deficit Ideology

Failing Still to Address Poverty Directly: Growth Mindset as Deficit Ideology | educational implications | Scoop.it
Briefly, deficit ideology is a worldview that explains and justifies outcome inequalities— standardized test scores or levels of educational attainment, for example—by pointing to supposed deficiencies within disenfranchised individuals and communities (Brandon, 2003; Valencia, 1997a; Weiner, 2003; Yosso, 2005). Simultaneously, and of equal importance, deficit ideology discounts sociopolitical context, such as the systemic conditions (racism, economic injustice, and so on) that grant some people greater social, political, and economic access, such as that to high-quality schooling, than others (Brandon, 2003; Dudley-Marling, 2007; Gorski, 2008a; Hamovitch, 1996). The function of deficit ideology, as I will describe in greater detail later, is to justify existing social conditions by identifying the problem of inequality as located within, rather than as pressing upon, disenfranchised communities so that efforts to redress inequalities focus on “fixing” disenfranchised people rather than the conditions which disenfranchise them (Weiner, 2003; Yosso, 2005).

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Benefit cuts to trap five million UK children in poverty by 2020 - report

Benefit cuts to trap five million UK children in poverty by 2020 - report | educational implications | Scoop.it

A record five million children in the UK could be trapped in poverty by 2020, according to new research.


Via ESRC
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ESRC's curator insight, May 30, 2014 6:59 AM

The Institute for Fiscal Studies, referenced in the article, receives funding from the ESRC..

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Science, values and the limits of measurement

Science, values and the limits of measurement | educational implications | Scoop.it
metrics are also damaging; particularly when naive counts or quantitative measures are used out of scope. And they are almost always out of scope. The metrics we have are at best proxies for some of the things we actually care about: influence, impact, importance and prestige. The report uses the term “indicators” in preference to “metrics” to emphasise both the usefulness and the limitations of these measures. To be useful they must be applied with a knowledge of what they can and cannot show.
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The road to resilience

The road to resilience | educational implications | Scoop.it
Resilience is the process of adapting well in the face of adversity, trauma, tragedy, threats or significant sources of stress — such as family and relationship problems, serious health problems or workplace and financial stressors. It means "bouncing back" from difficult experiences.
Research has shown that resilience is ordinary, not extraordinary. People commonly demonstrate resilience. One example is the response of many Americans to the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks and individuals' efforts to rebuild their lives.
Being resilient does not mean that a person doesn't experience difficulty or distress. Emotional pain and sadness are common in people who have suffered major adversity or trauma in their lives. In fact, the road to resilience is likely to involve considerable emotional distress.
Resilience is not a trait that people either have or do not have. It involves behaviors, thoughts and actions that can be learned and developed in anyone.
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Tackling the ethical challenges of big data

Tackling the ethical challenges of big data | educational implications | Scoop.it
Here we are, with more data than we know what to do with. And human beings have this tendency to give a lot of respect to technology. It's funny, if you look at charts and graphs, if you look at studies that come out, people tend to trust charts and graphs quite a bit. What's interesting is underneath that chart or that graph might be terrible data, and it actually might be showing something that's untrue. Or it might not account for something important.
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Computer Solves 120-Year-Old Biology Problem That Had Scientists Stumped

"The invention of models to explain what nature is doing is the most creative thing scientists do... this is the heart and soul of the scientific enterprise," says Levin. "None of us could have come up with this model; we as a field have failed to do so after over a century of effort. This problem, and our approach, is nearly universal. It can be used with anything, where functional data exist but the underlying mechanism is hard to guess."

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The author writes: “Essentially, the computer was guessing how a worm's genes connect together, and simulating a new theory each time - if the end results were closer to data obtained in the real world, it took another step in that direction; if not, it changed course. After three days, the software came up with a core genetic network code that matched all of the hundreds of actual experiments in its database.” 

I wonder about this level of creativity and scientific automation. Could a quantum computer do this faster? Years of programming led to the computer solving this 120-year-old problem in 3 days. Could a quantum computer do this in minutes? The issue is that the computer used the ability to create and research hypotheses. It matched its "ideas" against the closest executed experiments. 
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Sharrock's curator insight, July 3, 10:42 AM
The author writes: “Essentially, the computer was guessing how a worm's genes connect together, and simulating a new theory each time - if the end results were closer to data obtained in the real world, it took another step in that direction; if not, it changed course. After three days, the software came up with a core genetic network code that matched all of the hundreds of actual experiments in its database.” 

 I wonder about this level of creativity and scientific automation. Could a quantum computer do this faster? Years of programming led to the computer solving this 120-year-old problem in 3 days. Could a quantum computer do this in minutes? The issue is that the computer used the ability to create and research hypotheses. It matched its "ideas" against the closest executed experiments.
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‘Return on Investment’: The Narrow, Short-Sighted Finance Concept That Has Taken Over Society

‘Return on Investment’: The Narrow, Short-Sighted Finance Concept That Has Taken Over Society | educational implications | Scoop.it
There’s more to life than can be measured in monetary returns.
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The Factors That Foster Wise Reasoning

The Factors That Foster Wise Reasoning | educational implications | Scoop.it
Empirical research on wisdom suggests that it’s not so much that some people simply possess wisdom and others lack it, but that our ability to reason wisely depends on a variety of external factors.
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Falsification: How to Destroy Incorrect Ideas

Falsification: How to Destroy Incorrect Ideas | educational implications | Scoop.it
One of the best ways to improve is to use the mental model of falsification. Read this to learn how to improve your thinking by destroying incorrect ideas.
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Portable Green Screens in the Library - Library Adventuring - Tim Ley @Tfley

Portable Green Screens in the Library - Library Adventuring - Tim Ley @Tfley | educational implications | Scoop.it

Earlier in the school year my students created whole-class videos using our large green screen studio. While I assigned students a variety of tasks (director, camera operator, acting coach), my students spent the majority of their time on the carpet as an audience member. At the end of these units I wondered how we could increase student ownership of the production. Could I have my students create a green screen movie without having to play the audience member for large portions of the time? Could they be empowered to create a movie independently of the teacher? Could this be done by kindergartners and first graders?


For most of the school year I struggled with these questions. That was until I met Brenda Windsor and Mary O'Neil of Trumbull, CT at the Fairfield University "Education Technology Collaboration Day" in March.  Brenda and Mary presented on how they have incorporated green screens in the classroom, and shared the idea of using a pizza box to make a miniature portable studio. Here is a link to the video they created.  From that moment, I was on a mission to have my K-2 students write, direct, film & star in their own collaborative group mini green screen movies. "


Via John Evans
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Becky Roehrs's curator insight, June 30, 10:44 AM

What a great idea-use pizza boxes as your green screens for your iPads (or smartphones), add (tape) green (paper) to rulers, then add (tape) animal cutouts (or people, monsters, aliens) to your green rulers, and move your rulers around on your green screen pizza box! You're ready for a live-action video production.