educational implications
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educational implications
Theory and technology with possible impacts on how we learn
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Dissection of an Argument - Toolkit For Thinking

Dissection of an Argument - Toolkit For Thinking | educational implications | Scoop.it
Toolkit of ideas and techniques to help your creative and critical thinking including problem solving, logical fallacies and decision making.
Sharrock's insight:

This resource may be of help for those in writing, education, and other fields where critical thinking is necessary for production and for producing value. Along with keeping rhetorical fallacies at hand. 

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Quality Homework: A Smart Idea

Quality Homework: A Smart Idea | educational implications | Scoop.it
We ought to be asking a different question altogether. What should matter to parents and educators is this: How effectively do children’s after-school assignments advance learning?
Sharrock's insight:
This is an important reframe and research into the homework question. As usual, it's not an either/or question; it's a what works question.
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Why do university-managed blogs matter? On the importance of public, open and networked digital infrastructure.

Why do university-managed blogs matter? On the importance of public, open and networked digital infrastructure. | educational implications | Scoop.it
Academic blogging is increasingly valued by academics and institutions as a worthwhile activity. But universities are still struggling to provide the right balance of infrastructure and services to…
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Turn screen time into learning time

Turn screen time into learning time | educational implications | Scoop.it
Screen time gets a bad rap, but laptops, tablets and phones offer many ways for students to create, solve problems, collaborate and meet the ISTE Standards for Students.
Sharrock's insight:
excerpt: "Screen time gets more bad press than a Hollywood star in rehab. But the fact is, not all screen time is the same. Screen time is like food: some of it’s bad for you and some of it’s good for you, and moderation is key. "It’s not the screen but what you do with it that matters."
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Why smart people are better off with fewer friends

Why smart people are better off with fewer friends | educational implications | Scoop.it
"The findings in here suggest (and it is no surprise) that those with more intelligence and the capacity to use it ... are less likely to spend so much time socializing because they are focused on some other longer term objective."
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Believable Fictions: On the Nature of Emotional Responses to Fictional Characters – Howard Sklar – Helsinki English Studies: Electronic Journal

Believable Fictions: On the Nature of Emotional Responses to Fictional Characters – Howard Sklar – Helsinki English Studies: Electronic Journal | educational implications | Scoop.it
In this essay, I address the long-standing debate within aesthetic philosophy on the nature of readers’ emotional responses to fictional characters.  After reviewing some theories that regard fiction-generated emotions as considerably different from emotions that we experience in our everyday lives, I elaborate my own view that we bring many of the same intuitions and forms of evaluation to our encounters with fictional characters that we use with real people.  With this in mind, I attempt to show that our emotional responses to fictional characters more greatly resemble real-life emotions than some aesthetic theorists would like to concede.
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The Myth of Failure - Case Foundation

The Myth of Failure - Case Foundation | educational implications | Scoop.it
In our fourth Myth of the Entrepreneur series, we discuss how to ensure that failure doesn’t close the doors on entrepreneurs from particular backgrounds. "what about the downside of failure? Failure deeply affects the lives of the entire team, investors, vendors and customers. When a business goes under there are real, live people who lose their employment, families that lose their seed stage investing and entrepreneurs who can be left with overwhelming debt." (Excerpt)
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If Adults Forget So Much of What They Learned in School, What’s the Point?

If Adults Forget So Much of What They Learned in School, What’s the Point? | educational implications | Scoop.it
Adults remember more of what they learned in school than they think they do—thanks to an aspect of education that doesn’t get much attention in policy debates.
Sharrock's insight:
(excerpt) "Researchers have long known that going to school boosts IQ. The question is whether it makes people smarter by building mental horsepower, by adding to students’ database of knowledge and skills, or some of each component."
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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, February 25, 1:07 PM

What we should try remembering is how we felt in the experiences we had as students. Curriculum is an autobiographical making sense of what we learn and teach. It is not a free-for-all, but the planned curriculum filters through the lived experiences of teachers.

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Imogen Heap wants to use blockchain technology to revolutionize the music industry

Imogen Heap wants to use blockchain technology to revolutionize the music industry | educational implications | Scoop.it
Cape Town, South Africa British singer and songwriter Imogen Heap is building what she calls a “fair trade” music industry that aims to sidestep middlemen like iTunes and Spotify and give musicians more ownership over the money and data produced by...
Sharrock's insight:
(Excerpt ) "Heap wants to create a free platform where musicians have control over the data created by their songs as they circulate among fans and other musicians, including the song’s credits, terms of usage dictated by the artist, where the song is played and when, and any transactions. This information is tracked using blockchain technology, a method of recording digital transactions first used for Bitcoin."
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My Writing Education: A Time Line - The New Yorker

My Writing Education: A Time Line - The New Yorker | educational implications | Scoop.it
Why do we love our writing teachers so much? Why, years later, do we think of them with such gratitude? I think it’s because they come along when we need them most, when we are young and vulnerable and are tentatively approaching this craft that our culture doesn’t have much respect for, but which we are beginning to love. They have so much power. They could mock us, disregard us, use us to prop themselves up. But our teachers, if they are good, instead do something almost holy, which we never forget: they take us seriously. They accept us as new members of the guild. They tolerate the under-wonderful stories we write, the dopy things we say, our shaky-legged aesthetic theories, our posturing, because they have been there themselves.
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The biggest loophole of all

The biggest loophole of all | educational implications | Scoop.it
Having launched and led the battle against offshore tax evasion, America is now part of the problem

 

"DEVIN NUNES raised eyebrows in 2013 when, as chairman of a congressional working group on tax, he urged reforms that would make America “the largest tax haven in human history”. Though he was thinking of America’s competitiveness rather than turning his country into a haven for dirty money, the words were surprising: America is better known for walloping tax-dodgers than welcoming them. Its assault on Swiss banks that aided tax evasion, launched in 2007, sparked a global revolution in financial transparency. Next year dozens of governments will start to exchange information on their banks’ clients automatically, rather than only when asked to. The tax-shy are being chased to the world’s farthest corners."

Sharrock's insight:

It's not that simple, although it could be skimmed over superficially: "All this leads some to brand America a hypocrite. But a fairer diagnosis would be that it has a split personality. The Treasury wants more data-swapping and corporate transparency, and has made several proposals to bring America up to the level of the CRS. But most need congressional approval, and politicians are in no rush to enact them. Some suspect that their reluctance, ostensibly due to concerns about red tape, has more to do with giving America’s financial centres an edge."

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Stand Up and Be Counted: Why social science should stop using the qualitative/quantitative dichotomy

Stand Up and Be Counted: Why social science should stop using the qualitative/quantitative dichotomy | educational implications | Scoop.it
Qualitative and quantitative research methods have long been asserted as distinctly separate, but to what end? Howard Aldrich argues the simple dichotomy fails to account for the breadth of collect...

Via Dr Derek Jones
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Dr Derek Jones's curator insight, November 30, 2015 7:54 AM

Over recent years I have delivered my opinions to various audiences about simplistic distinctions between qualitative and quantitative research - this piece captures nicely (and much better) some of my issues.

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Read This If You Just Need Someone To Give You A Chance At Your Dream Job

Read This If You Just Need Someone To Give You A Chance At Your Dream Job | educational implications | Scoop.it
There’s something for you. It’s right around you. “A ship lost at sea for many days suddenly sighted a friendly vessel. From the mast of the unfortunate vessel was seen a signal: “Water, water. We die of thirst.” The answer from the friendly vessel at once came back: “Cast down your bucket where you are.” A second time, the signal, “Water, send us water!” went up from the distressed vessel. And was answered: “Cast down your bucket where you are.” A third and fourth signal for water was answered: “Cast down your bucket where you are.” The captain of the distressed vessel, at last heeding the injunction, cast down his bucket and it came up full of fresh, sparkling water from the mouth of the Amazon River.”
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Big Brains, Small Minds

Big Brains, Small Minds | educational implications | Scoop.it

If we treat the contemplation of the best life as a luxury we cannot afford, seemingly urgent matters will crowd out the truly important ones.

"If the aim of education is to gain money and power, where can we turn for help in knowing what to do with that money and power? Plato knew this firsthand. He had watched as ambition, tied to technological superiority, had led his fellow Athenians to engage in a number of poorly conceived military campaigns, the last of which had allowed the Spartans to lay siege to Athens. In the face of such a ruthless foe, Athens did what any wealthy democracy would do: It built a wall around itself. Some of the walls of the Peloponnesian War are still visible, hastily built out of whatever the Athenians could lay hands on — the remnants of roofs and doorposts — suggesting that some buildings were torn down to make them. That is instructive, if not cautionary. It is often the case that in our attempts to guard ourselves we destroy the very things that we long to protect. Identifying and negotiating these paradoxes is the stuff of a liberal-arts education."

Sharrock's insight:
I find that the same argument can be made about dogmatic atheists rejecting religious knowledge. There is a wealth of information available concerning dignity, happiness, meaningful living, ethics and morality (to name just a few). A lot of heavy lifting has already been done. Combining these ideas with religiously-motivated philosophy may advance our understanding of dignity which drives many discussions about rights and culture-building. 
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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, May 16, 10:01 AM
The article blends Plato and Aristotle. Education is a much broader concept than schooling and school is merely one component. To ask questions in ways that open conversations up and keep them open is a key to all forms of education, including school.
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High School of the Future: Cutting-edge model capitalizes on blended learning to take personalization further

High School of the Future: Cutting-edge model capitalizes on blended learning to take personalization further | educational implications | Scoop.it
Cutting-edge model capitalizes on blended learning to take personalization further
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The specialist–generalist continuum

The specialist–generalist continuum | educational implications | Scoop.it
In The Neo-Generalist, Kenneth Mikkelsen and I explore how those with preferences for the WWW curve of the continuum nevertheless find themselves practising all over the map, responding and adapting to context. We illustrate our argument with stories drawn from interviewees, historical figures, business, activism, science, sport, the military, art and popular culture. We even delve into our personal experiences to explore how they correspond to the continuum. Here is my learning–working story distilled
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Solving the Special Education Crisis through Onlin https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/solving-special-education-crisis-through-online-speech-julie-george

More than 13 percent of America’s school-aged population—more than six million children—require special education today according to the National Center for Education Statistics. Given this challenge, compounded by a nationwide shortage of special education teachers and related services clinicians, schools struggle to provide the federally mandated services these students need to progress academically.
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Researchers found a better way to learn a new skill

Researchers found a better way to learn a new skill | educational implications | Scoop.it
What’s the best way to learn a new skill, such as playing the guitar? Multiple hours spent doing the same task over and over is thought to be the optimal strategy – practice makes perfect, as many would say. The secret lies in the six-hour gap between training sessions that the groups were given. The memory of their new skill is “consolidated” within the brain during this time period, wherein the neural connections in the brain form and “preserve” the memory. With this memory consolidated, the volunteers could reactivate it during the second training session in order to perform the task with increased ease.
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Characters from novels can influence real-life behaviour » MobyLives

Characters from novels can influence real-life behaviour » MobyLives | educational implications | Scoop.it
It’s a phenomenon known as ‘experience-taking’, an unconscious process in which we identify with characters to the point of mentally merging our own identities with theirs. That’s as opposed to the less extreme ‘perspective-taking’, ‘where people try to understand what another person is going though in a particular situation’ — or empathy, the development of which has long been held to be one of the fruits of reading.
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The proof of the pudding: A series of applied tests on embodied cognition

The proof of the pudding: A series of applied tests on embodied cognition | educational implications | Scoop.it
Embodied cognition refers to the idea that our thinking is shaped by our corporeal nature (Glenberg et al. 2013). Many thus believe that our understanding of even high-level, abstract concepts is grounded in our more concrete bodily experiences (Meier et al. 2012), and that commonly-used metaphors accurately represent these abstract-concrete connections. For example, we often describe an emotionally close relationship as warm and an emotionally distant one as cold. And, in fact, research has shown that social exclusion leads people to estimate their surroundings as a couple of degrees colder (Zhong & Leonardelli 2008) and even causes actual drops in body temperature (IJzerman et al. 2012). This relationship also seems to work in reverse.
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True Grit and Genetics: Predicting Academic Achievement From Personality.

True Grit and Genetics: Predicting Academic Achievement From Personality. | educational implications | Scoop.it
Grit—perseverance and passion for long-term goals—has been shown to be a significant predictor of academic success, even after controlling for other personality factors. Here, for the first time, we use a U.K.-representative sample and a genetically sensitive design to unpack the etiology of Grit and its prediction of academic achievement in comparison to well-established personality traits. For 4,642 16-year-olds (2,321 twin pairs), we used the Grit-S scale (perseverance of effort and consistency of interest), along with the Big Five personality traits, to predict grades on the General Certificate of Secondary Education (GCSE) exams, which are administered U.K.-wide at the end of compulsory education. Twin analyses of Grit perseverance yielded a heritability estimate of 37% (20% for consistency of interest) and no evidence for shared environmental influence. Personality, primarily conscientiousness, predicts about 6% of the variance in GCSE grades, but Grit adds little to this prediction. Moreover, multivariate twin analyses showed that roughly two-thirds of the GCSE prediction is mediated genetically. Grit perseverance of effort and Big Five conscientiousness are to a large extent the same trait both phenotypically (r = 0.53) and genetically (genetic correlation = 0.86). We conclude that the etiology of Grit is highly similar to other personality traits, not only in showing substantial genetic influence but also in showing no influence of shared environmental factors. Personality significantly predicts academic achievement, but Grit adds little phenotypically or genetically to the prediction of academic achievement beyond traditional personality factors, especially conscientiousness. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)

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IDLab-UB's curator insight, February 12, 10:02 AM

Grit adds little to the prediction of academic performance when compared to other personality traits

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The Limits of Social Engineering

The Limits of Social Engineering | educational implications | Scoop.it
Tapping into big data, researchers and planners are building mathematical models of personal and civic behavior. But the models may hide rather than reveal the deepest sources of social ills.
Sharrock's insight:
“The power of social physics,” he writes, “comes from the fact that almost all of our day-to-day actions are habitual, based mostly on what we have learned from observing the behavior of others.” 
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How to Escape From the Vicious Cycle of Shaming in Our Digital World

How to Escape From the Vicious Cycle of Shaming in Our Digital World | educational implications | Scoop.it
One benefit of shaming is that it can be an effective way to regulate people’s behaviors in a relatively peaceful and nonviolent fashion.
Sharrock's insight:

excerpt: "Our reputation is very important to us – it matters to us that we showcase a positive “image” to others. Shame is a very social emotion that is often coupled with this desire to be accepted and respected by others."

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, February 19, 12:54 PM

Having experienced the shaming process, I found that it comes from unexpected sources, people who do not recognize what they are doing is one possible explanation. Worse, they know what they are doing and do it anyway.

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Medical and Health Services Managers : Occupational Outlook Handbook : U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

Medical and Health Services Managers : Occupational Outlook Handbook : U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics | educational implications | Scoop.it
Medical and health services managers, also called healthcare executives or healthcare administrators, plan, direct, and coordinate medical and health services. They may manage an entire facility, a specific clinical area or department, or a medical practice for a group of physicians. Medical and health services managers must adapt to changes in healthcare laws, regulations, and technology.

Duties

Medical and health services managers typically do the following:

Work to improve efficiency and quality in delivering healthcare services
Develop departmental goals and objectives
Ensure that the facility in which they work is up to date on and compliant with new laws and regulations
Recruit, train, and supervise staff
Manage the finances of the facility, such as patient fees and billing
Create work schedules
Prepare and monitor budgets and spending to ensure departments operate within allocated funds
Represent the facility at investor meetings or on governing boards
Keep and organize records of the facility’s services, such as the number of inpatient beds used
Communicate with members of the medical staff and department heads
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When Virtual Reality Meets Education - TechCrunch

When Virtual Reality Meets Education - TechCrunch | educational implications | Scoop.it

Educators and students alike are seeking an ever-expanding immersive landscape, where students engage with teachers and each other in transformative experiences through a wide spectrum of interactive resources. In this educational reality, VR has a definitive place of value.


Via Nik Peachey, John Evans
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Viljenka Savli (http://www2.arnes.si/~sopvsavl/)'s curator insight, February 10, 11:44 AM

It seems we can hope to use it also in education pretty soon. 

Rosemary Tyrrell's curator insight, February 15, 7:27 PM

The test of VR will be in the kinds of content that are created. I think we will see an explosion when we have a headset that is comfortable to wear. 

Margaret Bradley's curator insight, March 3, 5:02 PM

Hope to see lots more about this soon.

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Lessons Learned -- Why the Failure of Systems Thinking Should Inform the Future of Design Thinking

Lessons Learned -- Why the Failure of Systems Thinking Should Inform the Future of Design Thinking | educational implications | Scoop.it
"You never learn by doing something right cause you already know how to do it. You only learn from making mistakes and correcting them.&quot...
Sharrock's insight:

excerpt: "In addition to engaging a much larger community in knowledge-sharing, such an approach will provide the users of design thinking with "trial-size" access to a growing body of knowledge. One wouldn't have to buy the whole of "design thinking", for example, to accept that there are places in management where sketching could help out, or that for a large class of problems spending more time on problem framing and reframing will pay dividends down the line. In time, each manager will do what we have learned designers do, adopt those methods, techniques and ideas that best suit their own personal style and the nature of the problems that they typically encounter. In the end then, rather than learning and subscribing to a theory or system of thought that is based on ideas from design, managers and policy makers will become designers of a sort particularly suited to their circumstances."

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