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educational implications
Theory and technology with possible impacts on how we learn
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Dissection of an Argument - Toolkit For Thinking

Dissection of an Argument - Toolkit For Thinking | educational implications | Scoop.it
Toolkit of ideas and techniques to help your creative and critical thinking including problem solving, logical fallacies and decision making.
Sharrock's insight:

This resource may be of help for those in writing, education, and other fields where critical thinking is necessary for production and for producing value. Along with keeping rhetorical fallacies at hand. 

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If at First You Don't Succeed,
You're in Excellent Company

If at First You Don't Succeed,  <br/>You're in Excellent Company | educational implications | Scoop.it
What makes some people rebound from defeats and go on to greatness while others throw in the towel? Psychologists call it "self-efficacy," the unshakable belief some people have that they have what it takes to succeed.
Sharrock's insight:

excerpt: "You can develop a resilient mindset at any age," says Robert Brooks, a Harvard Medical School psychologist who has studied resilience for decades. One key, he says, is to avoid self-defeating assumptions.

 

another excerpt: "Where does such determination come from? In some cases it's inborn optimism -- akin to the kind of resilience that enables some children to emerge unscathed from extreme poverty, tragedy or abuse. Self-efficacy can also be acquired by mastering a task; by modeling the behavior of others who have succeeded; and from what Prof. Bandura calls "verbal persuasion" -- getting effective encouragement that is tied to achievement, rather than empty praise."

 
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How Your Diet Affects Your Internal Clock

How Your Diet Affects Your Internal Clock | educational implications | Scoop.it
Much as we manage exposure to light in order to protect healthy sleep and circadian function, research like this offers further suggestion that we may also be able to manage dietary consumption to help keep circadian rhythms functioning properly....
Sharrock's insight:
another aenue to improve learning.
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Critical Thinking Pathways

Critical Thinking Pathways | educational implications | Scoop.it
To teach critical thinking, consider applying six definitions of that discipline to the practices of authentic inquiry, PBL, and integrated studies.
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Why 'Nature Versus Nurture' Often Doesn't Matter

Why 'Nature Versus Nurture' Often Doesn't Matter | educational implications | Scoop.it
Sometimes it just doesn't make any sense to try to separate the social and the biological.
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Excerpt: "The word “neuropsychosocial” does away with the common nature/nurture divide, and so did the researchers. Rather than asking whether teens abuse alcohol because of social influences or innate biology, the scientists looked at those variables that could be measured, regardless of whether the variables were social, biological, or a mix of both." http://www.psmag.com/navigation/nature-and-technology/alcohol-drinking-teenagers-nature-versus-nurture-often-doesnt-matter-89083/
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Is Muscle Memory a Real Thing? | Nerd Fitness

Is Muscle Memory a Real Thing? | Nerd Fitness | educational implications | Scoop.it
I slid into home on a close play. It was a few weeks back during a recreational kickball game, and because I essentially slid with 100% effort (while
Sharrock's insight:

I'm exploring some ideas about conative domain and some connections to muscle memory. I found this article. easy to read and expresses some good ideas. 

 

The body has evolved ways to save energy in terms of willpower and effort. From my reading of Thinking, Fast and Slow, by Daniel Kahneman, System 2 takes a great deal of effort and will but is eventually used up. System 1 is our autopilot mode. enter muscle memory. enter "chunking". enter "flow". 

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Adaptability is Genius & Generosity

Adaptability is nature’s genius. Species that can adapt, evolve and survive.

There are those who think adaptability is genius in nature but not in people. They see people skills adaptability as weakness and lack of authenticity. To them, an adaptable person is a chameleon. Yet this is not true. Adaptability doesn’t make you a chameleon; what’s in your heart does.

 

With a generous heart, adaptability is genius. It is the brilliance in leadership, teamwork, customer service, innovation, career, people skills, personal relationships and much much more.

 

Adaptability is the capacity to see differences and changes and the willingness and skill to respond for a positive result. Adaptability is not submission and surrender. Adaptability and authenticity are not opposites nor mutually exclusive.

In Leadership.

Adaptability is the keen sense of what changes will impact the organization and the skill to change appropriately. A changing workforce, competitive products, global markets, educational strengths and shortfalls, laws and regulations, political shifts, human tragedies all create the need to adapt. Adaptability is the organization’s genius to survive.



In Innovation.

Innovation is adaptability in action. It requires leaders and teams to overcome comfort and love of what they previously created. Adaptability is the generosity to overcome habit and the genius to focus on what is needed going forward.



In Teamwork.

Teamwork is the practice of growth and change to achieve a shared success. Without adaptability, it doesn’t happen. Several things can derail team success: personality type differences, various learning styles, conative approaches, communication preferences, goal orientations, etc…

Adaptability bridges these differences into collective success. It requires both the genius of how to adapt and the generosity to put the team ahead of personal preference.



In Career.

No matter how great our plans, our schooling, or our intelligence, achieving career success is rarely a straight line up. Adaptability facilitates career success.Shifting gears when our dream job doesn’t materialize keeps us moving forward. Being open and adaptable to coaching and mentoring creates career fit.

Social networking done with mutual give and take is the generosity of adaptability in action. It is the genius of tapping shared human needs for mutual success.



In Customer Service.

If we don’t adapt to customers, they become another company’s customers. Sometimes when their needs are outside of our company’s mission, this is acceptable. Companies do fail when they try to become everything to everybody. Yet adaptability to customers within our mission is essential for success.

Adapting to customers shows our generous hearts that touch theirs. Adaptability creates memorable customer experiences that keep them coming back for more. This is the genius of shared success. 


In People Skills.

People skills are the outward expression of both our identity and adaptability. People skills adaptability doesn’t undermine our authenticity. It truly shows whether we are flexible and open-minded vs. rigid and closed-minded. It shows our genius in spotting others’ styles and needs. It communicates our generosity to interact (not just act).

Mutual give and take — adaptability — is the essence of forming positive relationships with others. Those who won’t and don’t may dominate for awhile yet lose in the end. Our street smarts are a form of adaptability that protect us from those with evil intent!

 


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Problem solving--Dr. David H. Jonassen: 18

Problem solving--Dr. David H. Jonassen: 18 | educational implications | Scoop.it

What are two major ideas/models of Dr. Jonassen? Please explain these ideas/models.

Model one: Mindtools

Jonassen argued that traditional means of knowledge assessment only used one type of solving method which required less cognitive skills.For example, students who can solve math problems using formulas could not apply those same formulas to real-world or scenario based problems. The students relied too much on the memorization of the formula and not on learning the concepts that would help them apply their problem solving skills in the real world. Jonassen theorized that computer technology could help students represent what they are learning in different ways. He called computers mindtools and defined it as knowledge construction tools used to learn with not from (Carr & Jonassen, 2000). This way the student is in complete control of their learning environment. They design, organize and interpret their own personal knowledge. Below are some of the mindtools he gives as examples:

 

Databases: Allow the student to use simple to complex queries to solve problems. This helps a student develop critical thinking skills as they construct their queries to get the appropriate data set. Sometimes the database can be populated by the students themselves and gives them a chance to exercise their cognitive skills in collecting data that must conform to whatever data structure they use. This knowledge base is an example of a database mindtool.

Semantic mapping (concept mapping): Students construct visual maps of related concepts connected together by lines as a study tool. Programs such as Microsoft Visio, Omnigraffle or VUE from Tufts University can help students create concept maps.These maps allow a student to identify the important concepts and connect those together as well as label the relationship they have with one another. Semantic mapping allows students to deeply process the knowledge they have learned by allowing them relate, reorganize and describe the information contained in a map.

Spreadsheets: Allow the student to perform what-if scenarios by changing values in one cell and having the changes cascade throughout the related cells. Students use spreadsheets to consider the implications of certain conditions or options and speculate and hypothesize about outcomes (Carr & Jonassen, 2000). Using spreadsheets also allows students to represent their knowledge as mathematical formulas and phenomena.

 

Model two: Instructional design models for well-structured and ill-structured problem-solving learning outcomes

 

According to Dr. Jonassen, there are three kinds of problems: puzzle problems, well-structured problems and ill-structured problems. Puzzle problems are well-structured with a single correct answer where all elements required for the solution are known and solutions require using logical, algorithmic processes (Kitchner, 1983). Well-structured application problems require the application of a finite number of concepts, rules and principles being studied to a constrained problem situation. Ill-structured problems are typically emergent dilemmas that are encountered in everyday practice. In 1983, Wood said that they are ill-defined (as cited in Jonassen, 1997). Voss, in 1988, added that ill-structured problems have unclear goals and unstated constraints (as cited in Jonassen, 1997), and in 1983, Kichner stated that ill-structured problems process multiple solutions or no solution at all (as cited in Jonassen, 1997), have multiple criteria, have less manipulative parameters and have no prototypic cases. In a word, the concepts, rules and principles required in ill-structured problems are uncertain, inconsistent and ill-defined (Jonassen, 1997).

 

An instructional design model for well-structured problems.

Problem solving process for well-structured problems.

Step 1: Problem representation 

Step 2: Search for solutions. This step includes means-ends analysis, decomposing & simplifying and generate~test. Gick stated in 1986 that means-ends analysis involves reducing the discrepancy between the current state and the goal state of the problem by applying problem-solving operators (as cited in Jonassen, 1997). Decomposing & simplifying involves finding sub-goals. Generate~test evaluates for the potential to solve the problem.

Step 3: Implement solutions.

Designing and developing well-structured problem-solving instruction.

Step 1: Review prerequisite component concepts, rules, and principles. Solving well-structured problems requires learners to identify, select, and apply relevant domain information.

Step 2: Present conceptual or causal model of problem domain.

Step 3: Model problem solving performance in worked examples. Worked examples can help learners to construct useful problem schemas.

Step 4: Present practice problems.

Step 5: Support the search for solutions.

Step 6: Reflect on problem state and problem solution.

An instructional design model for ill-structured problems.

Process for solving ill-structured problems.

Step 1: Learners articulate problem space and contextual constraints. Ill-structured problems, according to Bransfor, depend on domain or context because they require the problem solver to think about the problems as realistic situations (as cited in Jonassen, 1997).

Step 2: Identify and clarify alternative opinions, positions and perspectives of stakeholders.

Step 3: Generate possible problem solutions.

Step 4: Assess the viability of alternative solutions by constructing arguments and articulating personal Beliefs.

Step 5: Monitor the problem space and solution options.

Step 6: Implement and monitor the solution.

Step 7: Adapt the solution. Few problems are solved in only a single attempt. Problem solvers recommend a solution and then adjust and adapt it based on feedback.

Designing and developing ill-structured problem-solving instruction.

Step 1: Articulate problem context.

Step 2: Introduce problem constraints.

Step 3: Locate, select and develop cases for learners.

Step 4: Support knowledge base construction.

Step 5: Support argument construction. The argument will provide the best evidence for domain knowledge that they have acquired.

 

 

Sharrock's insight:

excerpt:

"While Dr. Jonassen's attitudes toward problem-solving are not necessarily ambiguous, they take into account and leave room for the unknown factors of human involvement. "If we believe that the cognitive requirements of solving different kinds of problems varies, then so too must the nature of instruction that we use to support the development of problem-solving skills. Why? Among the most fundamental beliefs of instructional design is that different learning outcomes require different instructional conditions" (Jonassen, n.d.).

 

"Macklin cites Dr. Jonassen's creation of cognitive learning environments (CLEs) and lists specific steps for creating instruction (Macklin, 2003). However, he seems to understand that, a concrete list of design elements aside, this unknown factor does exist. The many different types of problems extant require instructional designers to mold their instruction accordingly (Macklin, 2003). This assessment seems to adhere closely to Dr. Jonassen's original intentions."

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BPS Research Digest: The simple piece of information that could dramatically increase your muscular endurance

BPS Research Digest: The simple piece of information that could dramatically increase your muscular endurance | educational implications | Scoop.it
Priebe and Spink said their findings "hint at the potency of the descriptive norm information and the potential effects of social influence on physical activity tasks." Participants in the social norms condition reported higher "self-efficacy" (belief in their own ability) than control participants, so this hints at a possible mechanism for the effect of the intervention.
Sharrock's insight:
could this research lead to increases persistence in the academic challenge realm?
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How cultures around the world think about parenting

How cultures around the world think about parenting | educational implications | Scoop.it
What can American parents learn from how other cultures think about parenting? A look at attitudes in Norway, Japan and Spain on the pressure to "parent" kids (as a verb).
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excerpt: "In the U.S., we want to be Korean and Dutch and Japanese and Jewish and Norwegian and Spanish, all at once. “What is unique to us is the desire to be happy all the time and experience no discomfort and achieve,” says Mogel. “These are competing values.”
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Why Tech Still Hasn't Solved Education's Problems

Why Tech Still Hasn't Solved Education's Problems | educational implications | Scoop.it
One researcher has a compelling hypothesis as to why the once-booming ed-tech sector has struggled.
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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, August 17, 1:17 AM

The points made in the series of tweets make sense. Teaching and learning are complex. It does take more than fast computers, the latest fads, and more money to make a difference. It takes considering what we want from the technology and how it this might impact teaching and learning. That requires the teacher's voice.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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4 Big Things Transformational Teachers Do

4 Big Things Transformational Teachers Do | educational implications | Scoop.it
Transformational teachers create experiences in their classrooms, melding the art and science of any subject and making their students care about learning.

Via Grant Montgomery
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A Paradigm Shift for Student Engagement

Even more interesting is that, according to research, children will play video games for several hours, yet fail as much as 80% of the time at those games, all the while continuing to persevere with an almost irrational determination.


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Nik Peachey's curator insight, August 14, 4:02 AM

Interesting article about making learning into a kind of computer game.

Edgar Mata's curator insight, August 15, 10:40 AM

Un buen artículo.

 

Tiene razón: Los niños y jóvenes pueden pasar horas con un vídeo-juego a pesar de que fallarán el 80% de las ocasiones y "perseverarán con  una determinación casi irracional", algo de esta perseverancia y determinación sería útil en el salón de clases.

 

Sin embargo, las críticas a su propuesta de usar juegos en la clase también tienen sentido:

"¿Qué pasará el próximo año cuando asistan a una nueva clase y se den cuenta que la escuela es trabajo y no 'juego y diversión'? Los estás preparando para una decepción."

 

Un interesante debate. 

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Is School Enough? | Professional Development | Classroom Resources | PBS Learning Media

Is School Enough? | Professional Development | Classroom Resources | PBS Learning Media | educational implications | Scoop.it
Digital classroom resources for Grades 6-12. Is School Enough? documents vivid examples of where new modes of learning and engagement are taking hold and flourishing.
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the document is made of video clips as chapters.
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How the web lost its way – and its founding principles

How the web lost its way – and its founding principles | educational implications | Scoop.it
When Tim Berners-Lee invented the world wide web 24 years ago he thought he'd created an egalitarian tool that shared information for the greater good. But it hasn't quite worked out like that.
Sharrock's insight:
Excerpt: " You've spent the day on the internet – but not on the web," argued Anderson. "This is not a trivial distinction. Over the past few years, one of the most important shifts in the digital world has been the move from the wide-open web to semiclosed platforms that use the internet for transport but not the browser for display. It's driven primarily by the iPhone model of mobile computing. And it's the world that consumers are increasingly choosing, not because they're rejecting the idea of the web but because these dedicated platforms often just work better or fit better into their lives. The fact that it's easier for companies to make money on these platforms only cements the trend."
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Where Original Ideas Come From

Where Original Ideas Come From | educational implications | Scoop.it
In order to create new paths, we first must venture outside of those that we have already travelled.
Sharrock's insight:
http://www.digitaltonto.com/2014/where-truly-original-ideas-come-from/ Excerpt: " At the core of Aristotelian logic is the syllogism, which is made up of propositions that consist of two terms (a subject and a predicate). If the propositions in the syllogism are true, then the argument is true. Much of our information technology today is based on Aristotle’s original idea. "Amazingly, Aristotle’s logic survived nearly 2000 years—until the late 19th century fully intact—when some flaws emerged having to do with a paradox in set theory. The effort to resolve these problems led to Gödel’s incompleteness theorems and eventually to the Turing machine that launched the computer age."
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21 Songs to Inspire You at Work | LinkedIn

21 Songs to Inspire You at Work | LinkedIn | educational implications | Scoop.it

We all love to be inspired at work, and we all love great music. So I asked people I respect what songs inspire them most at the office. I asked members of the Likeable team, as well as CEO's from the Young Entrepreneurs Council and the Entrepreneurs Organization for their favorite songs to get motivated at work, to get them feeling productive on days when that's not so easy, and to simply inspire them. Below are their choices along with select lyrics from each. From a wide variety of genres, some of these songs are sure to inspire you as well:

 

 

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Mario Kart 8 and the Centipede’s Dilemma

Mario Kart 8 and the Centipede’s Dilemma | educational implications | Scoop.it

The Centipede’s Dilemma refers to the idea that calling unconscious actions into consciousness can cause those actions to become perplexing or even impossible. In the above nineteenth century poem from which the idea was derived, a centipede becomes unable to walk when she is asked to explain the coordinated sequence in which she moves her legs. A more modern point of reference for the Centipede’s Dilemma might be 30 Rock’s Jack Donaghy forgetting how to move his arms while he walks.

 

"Playing a videogame might not seem as complicated as moving a hundred legs at once but many players take the complexity of videogame controls for granted. Many genres of videogames require precise, coordinated movements and swift reaction time."

Sharrock's insight:

repetition programs the body and mind to chunk or routinize coordinated movements and habits of thinking, problem solving, and decision making. 

 

when we see people at a store, we evaluate them to see who is in line, queued up, or who is merely standing around. Then we ask them if we aren't sure. We find patterns in chaos. However, the point is, we are habitualized into looking for a line. There aer consequences--imagined and also very real--for not performing this procedure.

 

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Why Do Americans Stink at Math?

Why Do Americans Stink at Math? | educational implications | Scoop.it
The Common Core should finally improve math education. The problem is that no one has taught the teachers how to teach it.
Sharrock's insight:

excerpt: "The opportunity to change the way math is taught, as N.C.T.M. declared in its endorsement of the Common Core standards, is “unprecedented.” And yet, once again, the reforms have arrived without any good system for helping teachers learn to teach them. Responding to a recent survey by Education Week, teachers said they had typically spent fewer than four days in Common Core training, and that included training for the language-arts standards as well as the math."


This excerpt is a gut-punch: "Without the right training, most teachers do not understand math well enough to teach it the way Lampert does. “Remember,” Lampert says, “American teachers are only a subset of Americans.” As graduates of American schools, they are no more likely to display numeracy than the rest of us. “I’m just not a math person,” Lampert says her education students would say with an apologetic shrug.


"Consequently, the most powerful influence on teachers is the one most beyond our control. The sociologist Dan Lortie calls the phenomenon the apprenticeship of observation. Teachers learn to teach primarily by recalling their memories of having been taught, an average of 13,000 hours of instruction over a typical childhood. The apprenticeship of observation exacerbates what the education scholar Suzanne Wilson calls education reform’s double bind. The very people who embody the problem — teachers — are also the ones charged with solving it."

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Enhancing Moral Conformity and Enhancing Moral Worth - Online First - Springer

Enhancing Moral Conformity and Enhancing Moral Worth - Online First - Springer | educational implications | Scoop.it

It is plausible that we have moral reasons to become better at conforming to our moral reasons. However, it is not always clear what means to greater moral conformity we should adopt. John Harris has recently argued that we have reason to adopt traditional, deliberative means in preference to means that alter our affective or conative states directly—that is, without engaging our deliberative faculties. One of Harris’ concerns about direct means is that they would produce only a superficial kind of moral improvement. Though they might increase our moral conformity, there is some deeper kind of moral improvement that they would fail to produce, or would produce to a lesser degree than more traditional means. I consider whether this concern might be justified by appeal to the concept of moral worth. I assess three attempts to show that, even where they were equally effective at increasing one’s moral conformity, direct interventions would be less conducive to moral worth than typical deliberative alternatives. Each of these attempts is inspired by Kant’s views on moral worth. Each, I argue, fails.


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How You Get Hooked On Coffee

A habit forms pretty much the way you expect: do the same behavior in the same place long enough and you'll form associations so strong that being in the place--or even just thinking of it--triggers the behavior. Once engrained, all habits (morning coffee among them) operate on a loop of environmental cues and subsequent actions that spiral toward a conclusion. To psychologists like Wendy Wood of the University of Southern California, a leading habit scholar, the process is known as"direct context cueing."

"Habits form when people repeat a response in a way that co-varies with particular context cues," Wood says. "The idea is that you make coffee first thing in the morning in your kitchen, and there's no other place or time when you do this."

Sharrock's insight:

Habit formation is very important for learning (since it is learning) and for professionals in general. Expertise is, after all, a number of habits of thinking and behavior. In Thinking, Fast and Slow, it seems this may describe how System 2 thoughts and actions can move into System 1 thoughts and actions.

 

excerpt: "Caffeine, it should be said, might facilitate habit formation in the early stages of coffee drinking, just as dopamine can add value to a behavior and thus strengthen its associations with a context or cue. But the stimulant doesn't run the habit show."

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A Brazilian Wunderkind Who Calms Chaos | Quanta Magazine

A Brazilian Wunderkind Who Calms Chaos |  Quanta Magazine | educational implications | Scoop.it
Artur Avila’s solutions to ubiquitous problems in chaos theory have “changed the face of the field,” earning him Brazil’s first Fields Medal.
Sharrock's insight:
Keep in mind that he's an accomplished genius while exploring the implications of this excerpt: " Two things Avila fears more than erratic buses are PowerPoint slides and income tax forms. The pressure to perfect a plenary talk for the thousands attending the 2010 math congress in Hyderabad, India, induced in him a kind of mental paralysis, he said. After giving a lecture at the California Institute of Technology in 2008, he declined an honorarium of more than $2,000 just to avoid the paperwork." “I would get fired pretty fast from most jobs,” he said, adding that he sleeps well past noon and is “not good at managing time.”
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Can a test measure your imagination?

Can a test measure your imagination? | educational implications | Scoop.it
Like any human performance metric -- IQ, LSAT scores, batting averages -- the new Imagination Quotient is intended to predict a competitive advantage. But does it work?
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Questioning

Questioning | educational implications | Scoop.it
while on their predictable adventure to the right of truth, kids often lose interest in the passions that once propelled them. It is our duty to either maintain their natural interest or compel them back to what really matters.
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The Importance of Informal Learning (Infographic)

The Importance of Informal Learning (Infographic) | educational implications | Scoop.it

Via bill woodruff, Ivon Prefontaine
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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, August 13, 4:52 PM

Informal learning might be seen as what happens outside School forming students' and teachers' personal curricula which mingle with the planned curricula presented by educationalists outside the classroom.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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Can a test measure your imagination?

Can a test measure your imagination? | educational implications | Scoop.it
Like any human performance metric -- IQ, LSAT scores, batting averages -- the new Imagination Quotient is intended to predict a competitive advantage. But does it work?
Sharrock's insight:
excerpt: “At the most basic level, imagination is the mental representation of things that are not immediately present to your senses,” says Barry Scott Kaufman, a psychologist at the University of Pennsylvania. "That is, imagination is whatever you’re thinking about when whatever you’re thinking about isn’t actually there in front of you."
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