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Professors argue for a new online learning model in Teaching Crowds book

Professors argue for a new online learning model in Teaching Crowds book | Educational development | Scoop.it
Why learn from a teacher or a tired old formal institution when you can learn from an online crowd? A couple of AU profs explore this question in their new book, Teaching Crowds: Learning and Social Media.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Peter Bryant, Simon Walker
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$5 million higher education investment to support world's best ...

$5 million higher education investment to support world's best ... | Educational development | Scoop.it
$5 million higher education investment to support world's best practice. Posted on dJune 18, 2014. c0 comments. Teaching at Australian Universities will receive a boost thanks to almost $5 million worth of specifically targeted grants and ...
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How to Improve Your LinkedIn Profile

How to Improve Your LinkedIn Profile | Educational development | Scoop.it
Do you want to make the most of your LinkedIn profile? This article reveals special features that enable you to make the most of your LinkedIn network.

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Network Event - Supporting Educational Innovation, Partnership & Change

Network Event - Supporting Educational Innovation, Partnership & Change | Educational development | Scoop.it

 University of Winchester - 18 & 19 February

 

This event has been designed to run over two days, bringing people together to support staff and students working as agents of change. People from across the country, facilitated by experts, will engage in areas of educational technology, assessment, staff development and change. 


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The 10 Skills Employers Most Want In 20-Something Employees

The 10 Skills Employers Most Want In 20-Something Employees | Educational development | Scoop.it
Are you able to work effectively in a team? That’s the skill employers most want when they are recruiting new college grads. The next most important skill: ability to make decisions and solve problems.

Via Alberto Acereda, Ph.D., Peter Bryant
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Alberto Acereda, Ph.D.'s curator insight, October 15, 2013 8:33 AM

Here are the 10 skills employers say they seek, in order of importance:

1. Ability to work in a team
2. Ability to make decisions and solve problems
3. Ability to plan, organize and prioritize work
4. Ability to communicate verbally with people inside and outside an organization
5. Ability to obtain and process information
6. Ability to analyze quantitative data
7. Technical knowledge related to the job
8. Proficiency with computer software programs
9. Ability to create and/or edit written reports
10. Ability to sell and influence others

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Conference Santiago de Compostela

Stephen Downes - design principles for MOOCs http://t.co/DoNmqae7 #mooc #telroadmaps
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Kamakshi Rajagopal's comment, April 12, 2013 1:40 PM
Hi Simon, we are conducting an experiment on Scoop.IT pages on education at the Open Universiteit (NL). Would you like to participate? Sign up here: http://bit.ly/14QR9oa
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Connectivism in Practice — How to Organize a MOOC | Peeragogy.org

Connectivism in Practice — How to Organize a MOOC | Peeragogy.org | Educational development | Scoop.it
RT @azhar_youssef: #diffimooc #etmooc How to organize MOOCs http://t.co/tE72KQyf I love the term "PEERAGOGY"
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Some interesting ideas on MOOC pedgaogy here.

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Flip This: Bloom’s Taxonomy Should Start with Creating

Flip This: Bloom’s Taxonomy Should Start with Creating | Educational development | Scoop.it
Chris Davis, Powerful Learning Practice LLC By Shelley Wright I think the revised Bloom’s Taxonomy is wrong. I know this statement sounds heretica
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plus critiquing, sharing and curating?

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Coursera starts process of taking control of and monetising formerly free MOOC. Here we go...

Coursera starts process of taking control of and monetising formerly free MOOC. Here we go... | Educational development | Scoop.it

This morning, Coursera, the "massively open online course" or MOOC platform founded by two Stanford professors, announced that they’d be partnering with ACE, the American Council on Education, to offer a path to college credit for select...

 

Starting early next year, anyone who successfully completes one of the selected Coursera courses will have the chance to take a proctored exam over the web from ACE, pay a small fee, and earn credit that could be accepted at up to 2,000 universities nationwide.The move comes in the midst of a struggle in the ed-tech movement over business models and openness. The issue is this: beginning with MIT’s Open CourseWare in 2001, the world’s greatest public and nonprofit universities started offering access to some of their professors’ lectures, notes, and other materials online for free. The stuff was under Creative Commons license, meaning anyone could use it or re-use it as they saw fit; but the material--45-minute, amateur-recorded lectures, years-old problem sets--often just sat there, as hard to find and underutilized as books moldering in the library stacks. That changed last January when Stanford’s open online AI course, based on short, snappy videos and quizzes, went viral, with over 200,000 signups. Enter the venture capitalists. That same educational material, funded by taxpayer money and private philanthropy, that used to be available to anyone for free is now being served on a platform that makes it easier to use, but places restrictions on its reuse and may have fees associated with it in the future. Now MOOCs may be very, very popular, but they’re not really open anymore.

 

 


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Paul Gagnon's comment, November 15, 2012 6:14 PM
Why am I not surprised...Horseshara...
Peter B. Sloep's comment, November 15, 2012 6:37 PM
No, the money has got to come from somewhere. Particularly if you have venture capitalists breathing in your neck. Still, read yesterday's MOOC pedagogy and accreditation by Terry Anderson. We should not become complacent and just think that it will blow over, it won't.
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Textbook Publisher Pearson Takes Down 1.5 Million Teacher And Student Blogs

Textbook Publisher Pearson Takes Down 1.5 Million Teacher And Student Blogs | Educational development | Scoop.it
If there's one thing we've seen plenty of here at Techdirt, it's the damage a single DMCA takedown notice can do. From shuttering a legitimate ebook lending site to removing negative reviews to destroying a user's...
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RRTeaching: Preparing for the MOOC-ocalypse | Rosie Redfield

RRTeaching: Preparing for the MOOC-ocalypse | Rosie Redfield | Educational development | Scoop.it

"A UBC colleague who's also going to be producing a Coursera course got me thinking about the future of the university. [...] Contemplating this for very long leads one to various philosophical considerations, such as "Since Coursera courses are free, why would students pay to go to university?" and then "Yikes, what will become of my job??!!!" "

 

Comment: the line of argument followed in this essay is a familiar one: MOOCs are there to stay, there are all these apocalyptic predictions about the disappearance of colleges and universities as we know them, hence, to stay employed, I'd better make the student experience worth their money. Apart from the observation that it is a bit ironic that only now that jobs are on the line, we start thinking about giving value for money, there are many problems with this kind of argument.

 

First, Rosie argues from the assumption that MOOC-courses are bound to improve shortly. I am not so sure, I actually think that on the average, when more people jump on the MOOC bandwagon, the quality will go down. Yes, the better courses may be tweaked to offer a better learning experience, for instance by replacing the fora with more intelligent ones that help the learner find sensible stuff amongst the massive number of not-so-useful entries.

 

Second, Rosie guesses that flipped classrooms, which provide tutoring next to a (free) MOOC, won't convince the students. That depends, I would say. Read Jonathan Marks' contribution, sitting next to this one. Also, she believes "nobody knows enough about how learning works to do a credible job of this". That simply isn't true. There is a long tradition of research on distance education which explains how to do this online and much research on learning in face-to-face settings other than classrooms and lecture halls which offers valuable insights (see my blog on Katie Vale's presentation, below). It is true, though, that this research has often been ignored by people used to and happy with ordinary lecturing.

 

Third, Rosie then concludes that "[...] one advantage a university gains by offering Coursera courses is that the enormous numbers of students and the online record-keeping make it possible to collect unprecedented amounts of data about student learning. But in practice most of the data will be worthless unless we carefully design our courses as learning experiments.' Under the label of learning analytics such data collection is already taking place and delivering insights. And, yes, it does make sense to carefully design courses as learning experiments. That is precisely what Harvard is doing with its EdX platform (again, see Kathie Vale). I would hope many more colleges start to do so, designing other learning environments than the default lecture hall and learn from the experience.

 

In summary, I don't believe the apocalyptic predictions about MOOCs for one minute. The educational landscape, shaped by learning needs and wants on the one hand and forms and environments for learning on the other, is too vast and rugged to be surveyd to the full by a search party led by commercial MOOC providers alone. However, it is a good thing we start to question the traditional, much trodden roads to learning. If that is what they manage to achieve, we should thank them for that. (peter sloep, @pbsloep)


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European Commission – Bringing teaching in from the cold

European Commission – Bringing teaching in from the cold | Educational development | Scoop.it

The European Commission’s launch of the High Level Group on the Modernisation of Higher Education, is taking the first steps to change this situation and shift the focus towards teaching. There is a significant  role for a new framework and the Larnaca Declaration on Learning Design may be the way forward.

The quality of teaching in higher education institutions is key to unlocking the full potential of students and creating a healthy economy and society.

few countries invest systematically in efforts to improve the quality of university teaching. Instead, university excellence is mostly conceived of in terms of research performance, as confirmed by the growing influence of current university rankings, based in the main only on research output.
Another model is possible and should be promoted. Excellence in university cannot – and should not – be associated only with excellence in research.

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Challenging E Learning in the University

Challenging E Learning in the University | Educational development | Scoop.it
This book examines some of the underlying principles and approaches which underpin e-learning in today's higher education.
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Professors argue for a new online learning model in Teaching Crowds book

Professors argue for a new online learning model in Teaching Crowds book | Educational development | Scoop.it
Why learn from a teacher or a tired old formal institution when you can learn from an online crowd? A couple of AU profs explore this question in their new book, Teaching Crowds: Learning and Social Media.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Peter Bryant
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Pinterest Adds Smarter Search Tool

Pinterest Adds Smarter Search Tool | Educational development | Scoop.it
Pinterest added Guided Search on Thursday, a new search tool with better filters to help users find content on the platform.

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David Blundell's curator insight, April 25, 2014 3:13 AM

At last, a better, faster way to search through Pinterest to find what you're after. This should particularly improve the mobile user experience . . .

Mariale Peñalosa Arguijo's curator insight, April 25, 2014 8:36 AM

 

 10
Margo Willis's curator insight, May 30, 2014 10:51 AM

Interesting and even more addictive :-)

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The pedagogy of the Massive Open Online Course (MOOC): the UK view | Siân Bayne and Jen Ross, the Higher Education Academy

The pedagogy of the Massive Open Online Course (MOOC): the UK view  | Siân Bayne and Jen Ross, the Higher Education Academy | Educational development | Scoop.it

The report contains four main sections:

• an overview of the current UK MOOC landscape, illustrating the rich and to date rather neglected history of innovation in open course delivery within the UK during the period preceding our engagement with the large MOOC platforms and the launch of FutureLearn;

• a literature review which addresses key areas of concern within the current published and grey literatures on MOOC pedagogy and associated contextual issues; here we outline what we see as the most important themes currently driving the MOOC pedagogy debate;

• a series of ‘snapshots’ of current UK MOOCs, with an emphasis on looking at the detail of teacher practice, and on approaching the question of MOOC pedagogy from the position of the active teacher-practitioner;

• a conclusion which brings together themes from the literature review with the ‘snapshots’ in order to outline what we consider to be the most pressing issues the UK higher education community should be addressing in relation to MOOC pedagogy.


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Peter B. Sloep's curator insight, March 9, 2014 12:26 PM

This is a valuable report, particularly since it doesn’t try to cover everything but focuses on pedagogical issues in particular. Also, the fact that the report limits itself to the UK situation may bother some, but the benefit again is depth. And the UK situation is contrasted with the well-known US MOOC platforms, portraying the UK MOOCs as being European in character. This is exemplified by the pan European OpenupEd platform, which exhibits such European values as equity, quality and diversity. A strong point is the literature review and the in-depth discussion of five exemplary MOOCs. Together, they show that the distinction between cMOOCs and xMOOCs is too simple, meanwhile intermediate and different kinds MOOCs have enriched the MOOC landscape.

 

The report contains a wealth of other interesting facts and views. Although it is of course a mere mark on the developmental timeline of MOOCs, anybody with an interest in their pedagogy should read it. It is time well spent.  @pbsloep

joan gavin's curator insight, March 10, 2014 6:19 AM

Important to remember that MOOCs are designed to give people a "taster" in a particular subject.  They are not intended to replace university degrees.

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Feels like we only go backwards – The need for a new pedagogy in HE #1 | Peter Bryant

Feels like we only go backwards – The need for a new pedagogy in HE #1 | Peter Bryant | Educational development | Scoop.it

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Peter Bryant's curator insight, January 17, 2013 11:59 AM

my views on the embedding of social interaction into HE programmes.  Yes, I have committed the cardinal sin of being meta about MOOCs ;-) #metamooc

Peter Bryant's curator insight, January 17, 2013 12:00 PM

my views on the embedding of social interaction within learning design...I got meta #metamooc

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How to design your online course

How to design your online course | Educational development | Scoop.it
You can follow this simplified course design guide lines stage by stage. State the rational for your online course, e.g. to reach a wider audience, etc...

Via Dennis T OConnor
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miracletrain 夢想驛站's curator insight, September 30, 2013 2:43 AM

I love this mind map!!!

David Nandigam's curator insight, November 28, 2013 5:27 AM

“Now I existed solely thanks to the quantum paradox, my brain a collection of qubits in quantum superposition, encoding truths and memories, imagination and irrationality in opposing, contradictory states that existed and didn't exist, all at the same time.” ― Robin Wasserman, Crashed

Alfredo Corell's curator insight, March 23, 2014 1:13 PM
  • WHO IS THIS COURSE FOR?

    The  key factors are: Learners’ age, back ground knowledge, the purpose of learning, the learners’ circumstances (employed, students, unemployed, etc…)

  • DO YOU HAVE THE COURSE CURRICULUM?

    In many cases the course curriculum does exist, for example: National Curriculum, University course modules , In-house corporate training.

  • WHAT EXTERNAL PROFESSIONAL STANDARDS NEED TO BE MET?

    All external examination bodies provide an exam guide or syllabus which you have to insure your course will address them.

  • WHAT IS THE LEARNING ENVIRONMENT?

    Would your learners attend any face to face classes? Do they access their course from home, work, or college? Do they work as a group or individuals?

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#oldsmooc MOOC or COOP?

#oldsmooc MOOC or COOP? | Educational development | Scoop.it
Earlier today I made this comment on the blog post of an OLDS MOOC participant. “The serendipitous nature of connected learning has quickly led me to a like minded learner. Many thanks for co...
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Donald Clark Plan B: Mayer & Clark – 10 brilliant design rules for e-learning

Donald Clark Plan B: Mayer & Clark – 10 brilliant design rules for e-learning | Educational development | Scoop.it
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Paul Gagnon's curator insight, March 17, 2013 9:53 AM

This is highly instructive and should guide developimentos that strive for glitz over essence. 

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Of MOOCs and SOOCs | University of Greenwich Vice-Chancellor

Of MOOCs and SOOCs | University of Greenwich Vice-Chancellor | Educational development | Scoop.it

Via Peter Bryant
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wait and see is not a bad policy. We will learn from this OLDS MOOC experiment.

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Peter Bryant's curator insight, January 14, 2013 10:16 AM

The VC of Greenwich weighs into the MOOC debate

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Massive Open Online Courses Are Multiplying at a Rapid Pace

Massive Open Online Courses Are Multiplying at a Rapid Pace | Educational development | Scoop.it
Massive open online courses are the educational happening of the moment. Everyone wants in. No one is quite sure what they’re getting into.
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Is MOOC more than just a buzzword?

Is MOOC more than just a buzzword? | Educational development | Scoop.it

Are MOOCs really transforming the HE scene or is it a war on values and mission?

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Building Democratic Learning

Building Democratic Learning | Educational development | Scoop.it

The Limits of MOOCs I’ve been following a discussion thread about MOOCs (Massive Online Open Courses) on the ALT list and wrote this about the Limits of MOOCs, which I think we are trying to ...

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How a Teacher Made $1 Million Selling Lesson Plans

How a Teacher Made $1 Million Selling Lesson Plans | Educational development | Scoop.it

This is an interesting take on Learning Design and the principles of sharing designs.  The issue here is whether the designs being sold are innovative and trasformational or are appealing due to their conformity.

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