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Design Thinking: A creative process for school change | The Curious Creative

Design Thinking: A creative process for school change | The Curious Creative | Educational | Scoop.it

"During one of my workshops last year in Boston, Brad Ovenell-Carter (@braddo) put his visual notetaking skills to action. I took his lovely summary drawing and used ThingLink to add layers of information and elaboration."


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Debbie Rogers's curator insight, April 16, 2014 7:58 AM

Design thinking --visualization, collaboration, feedback, re-design!

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Libraries matter: 18 fantastic library infographics

Libraries matter: 18 fantastic library infographics | Educational | Scoop.it

"It’s great that such infographics are created. Infographics are a fantastic way to draw attention of online users, and give facts not only in a more digestible, but also highly entertaining way.


Many people still perceive libraries as awesome-looking magical places, full of a scent of old paper. We associate libraries with the past and with the analog world – the world that doesn’t fit into the broadband internet connection.

It’s not true (and I think it never was). More and more libraries lend electronic books, become information hubs, but most importantly, media creation centers.

These infographics change the perspective. They show the beautiful book temples are filled not only with the past, but also with the future."


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Elaine J Roberts, Ph.D.'s curator insight, August 7, 1:45 PM

Well, because libraries DO matter. ;)

 

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4 Strategies For Implementing Learning Stations In Your Classroom -

4 Strategies For Implementing Learning Stations In Your Classroom - | Educational | Scoop.it
What is a center or station? Desks or tables are grouped according to a particular skill or participants academic level in a group. Each group or table is differentiated to meet the learner where they are at academically. Here are a few tips for creating centers or stations.

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Victor Ventura's curator insight, August 3, 8:48 AM
I value the emphasis of the use of data to group,  differentiation, time management, and exit tickets to help make instructional decisions.
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Research Shows Students Learn Better When They Figure Things Out On Their Own

Research Shows Students Learn Better When They Figure Things Out On Their Own | Educational | Scoop.it
In some instances, research illuminates a topic and changes our existing beliefs. For example, here’s a post that challenges the myth of preferred learning styles. Other times, you might hear about a study and say, “Well, of course that’s true!” This might be one of those moments.
Last year, Dr. Karlsson Wirebring and fellow researchers published a study that supports what many educators and parents have already suspected: students learn better when they figure things out on their own, as compared to being told what to do.  

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David W. Deeds's curator insight, July 12, 6:51 PM

I had already figured this out on my own. ;) Thanks to John Evans.

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Free Technology for Teachers: 5 Reasons to Have a Classroom Blog

Free Technology for Teachers: 5 Reasons to Have a Classroom Blog | Educational | Scoop.it
Earlier today someone wrote the following in response to my post featuring a good example of a teacher and student blog,
"Franklly (sic) I don't want to blog with my students. I want to talk with them face to face in class."

While I appreciate that the person who wrote that comment on Facebook wants to emphasize the relationship she's trying to develop with her students, she's also overlooking the benefits of having a classroom blog. In short, it's not an "either or" proposition. You can have a classroom blog and develop face-to-face conversations with your students.

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Courtney Calhoun's curator insight, June 26, 3:38 PM

I am all about the blogging. I think it's a great way to keep parents informed of what's going on in the classroom and let students be part of the creation. I created a Google site last year instead of a blog because of our district's privacy policy for students. We treated it like a blog, I posted weekly updates with pictures, and then the Star Student got to write a little excerpt about themselves on their week. 

Victor Ventura's curator insight, June 28, 8:23 AM
If you see this as one more thing to do, you must also judge the potential benefits of the communication factor and the opportunity for personal student expression.
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A Self-Directed Learning Model For Critical Literacy

A Self-Directed Learning Model For Critical Literacy | Educational | Scoop.it
The above is the latest draft of our self-directed learning framework, version 1.1.

It is based, in spirit, on our Inside-Out School: A 21st Century Learning Model. It is intended to function as a guide for students–likely with the support and facilitation of teachers, parents, and mentors–to help students become expert learners.

The goal of the model isn’t content knowledge (though it should produce that), but rather something closer to wisdom–learning how to learn, understanding what’s worth understanding, and perhaps most importantly, analyzing the purpose of learning (e.g., personal and social change). It also encourages the student to examine the relationship between study and work–an authentic “need to know” with important abstractions like citizenship and legacy.

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Dr. Pyrate's curator insight, May 19, 8:40 AM
Teaching college transition course in the Fall. Perhaps students ought to look at this themselves.
Dr. Theresa Kauffman's curator insight, May 19, 9:23 AM
Kauffman Leadership Academy is not fully self-directed, however, we do utilize many of these questions to engage learners in purposeful activities. I like this graphic as a reference.
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30 Habits Of Highly Effective Teachers

30 Habits Of Highly Effective Teachers | Educational | Scoop.it
If you ask a student what makes him or her successful in school, you probably won’t hear about some fantastic new book or video lecture series. Most likely you will hear something like, “It was all Mr. Jones. He just never gave up on me.”

What students take away from a successful education usually centers on a personal connection with a teacher who instilled passion and inspiration for their subject. It’s difficult to measure success, and in the world of academia, educators are continually re-evaluating how to quantify learning. But the first and most important question to ask is:

Are teachers reaching their students? Here are 25 things successful educators do differently.

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GwynethJones's curator insight, May 9, 6:57 AM

This seems helpful!

Victor Ventura's curator insight, May 9, 7:27 PM
Be like this.
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Top 250 Global Attractions - How many have you seen?

Top 250 Global Attractions - How many have you seen? | Educational | Scoop.it

"The ultimate list of the greatest wonders in the world."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 10, 7:51 PM

I have been fortunate enough to have visited 53 of the places on this list (I have gaping holes in my list and the list itself has some gaping holes itself).  All lists are highly subjective; this list, for example, is heay on urban/cultural/European tourism sites and light on physical/Asian/African destinations.  Most geographers already have enough reasons to go traveling, but this list might spark more.  Who wants to map out these places to verify that initial impression? 

 

Questions to Ponder: Which places are on your dream list?  Which places do you think should have been added to this list?  

 

Tags: place, tourismculture, landscape, geo-inspiration.

Ken Feltman's curator insight, April 19, 8:13 AM
Where in the world have you been?
Michael MacNeil's curator insight, April 19, 4:47 PM
Share your insight
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Helping Kids find what they seek: Avoiding "Learned Helplessness"

Helping Kids find what they seek: Avoiding "Learned Helplessness" | Educational | Scoop.it
Curate and Create Learning Resources

If we want to have students seek out other information from sources other than the teacher, then we must make sure those resources are available. Many teachers using the flipped classroom approach already have created or found these kinds of resources. However, think broadly about the word resource. People are resources, texts are resources, and community organizations are resources -- to name just a few categories. We have to be comfortable not always knowing the answer, and instead suggesting we find the answer together through the vast amount of learning resources that we have at our disposal. Try curating these resources before, during, and after a unit. Work with students as well to create a culture where the answers are everywhere.

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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, April 4, 12:31 PM

Knowing how to ask questions will help anyone find what they seek. Why not start young?

Alexandria Yaxley's curator insight, April 27, 1:49 PM
A
Aha!
 
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52 Of Our Favorite Inspirational Quotes For Teachers - TeachThought

52 Of Our Favorite Inspirational Quotes For Teachers - TeachThought | Educational | Scoop.it
We’ve dug through dozens of books, teacher magazines, pinterest boards, and other blogs to find 52 of our favorite inspirational quotes for teachers. We’ve tried to come up with a range of ways of thinking about teaching and learning without resorting to the most cliche lines you’ve heard again and again.

Some of these you’ve likely heard before, but hopefully the bulk of them are both new, and capable of that extra push when you need it.

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, March 29, 9:34 AM
These are quotes that do not go out of style.
Lynnette Van Dyke's curator insight, March 29, 9:28 PM
These are quotes that do not go out of style.
Ron Wolford's curator insight, July 18, 11:19 AM
Teach Thought
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How ‘Ugly’ Fruits and Vegetables Can Help Solve World Hunger

How ‘Ugly’ Fruits and Vegetables Can Help Solve World Hunger | Educational | Scoop.it
About a third of the planet’s food goes to waste, often because of its looks. That’s enough to feed two billion people.

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Katerina Stojanovski's curator insight, March 10, 6:10 AM

No one should be surprised that more developed societies are more wasteful societies.  It is not just personal wasting of food at the house and restaurants that are the problem.  Perfectly edible food is thrown out due to size (smaller than standards but perfectly normal), cosmetics (Bananas that are shaped 'funny') and costumer preference (discarded bread crust).  This is an intriguing perceptive on our consumptive culture, but it also is helpful in framing issues such as sustainability and human and environmental interactions.  In a technologically advanced societies that are often removed form the land where the food they eat originates, food waste needs to made more explicit. 

 

Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, unit 5 agriculture.

NADINE BURCHI SCORP's curator insight, March 10, 1:24 PM

No one should be surprised that more developed societies are more wasteful societies.  It is not just personal wasting of food at the house and restaurants that are the problem.  Perfectly edible food is thrown out due to size (smaller than standards but perfectly normal), cosmetics (Bananas that are shaped 'funny') and costumer preference (discarded bread crust).  This is an intriguing perceptive on our consumptive culture, but it also is helpful in framing issues such as sustainability and human and environmental interactions.  In a technologically advanced societies that are often removed form the land where the food they eat originates, food waste needs to made more explicit. 


Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, unit 5 agriculture.

Dawn Haas Tache's curator insight, March 11, 9:29 PM
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Interactives about Syrian Refugee Crisis

Interactives about Syrian Refugee Crisis | Educational | Scoop.it
War, sectarian violence, and famine have forced more than 50 million people from their homes—the largest number of displaced people since World War II.

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Jukka Melaranta's curator insight, March 3, 10:40 AM

Here are two excellent ESRI StoryMaps about the Syrian refugee crisis; these are two very good examples of a great web maps. 

 

Tags: GIS, ESRI, mapping, cartography, geospatial, edtech, Syria, political, refugees.

malbert's curator insight, March 4, 1:30 AM

Here are two excellent ESRI StoryMaps about the Syrian refugee crisis; these are two very good examples of a great web maps. 

'The Uprooted' (focused more on Syria).
Epicenter of a Deepening Refugee Crisis (puts Syria into larger global patterns).

 

Tags: GIS, ESRI, mapping, cartography, geospatial, edtech, Syria, political, refugees.

Rachel Stutzman's curator insight, March 11, 10:28 AM

Here are two excellent ESRI StoryMaps about the Syrian refugee crisis; these are two very good examples of a great web maps. 

'The Uprooted' (focused more on Syria).
Epicenter of a Deepening Refugee Crisis (puts Syria into larger global patterns).

 

Tags: GIS, ESRI, mapping, cartography, geospatial, edtech, Syria, political, refugees.

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Curious About Design Thinking? Here's a Framework You Can Use in Any Classroom with Any Age Group | John Spencer

Curious About Design Thinking? Here's a Framework You Can Use in Any Classroom with Any Age Group | John Spencer | Educational | Scoop.it
The term "design thinking" is often attached to maker spaces and STEM labs. However, design thinking is bigger than STEM. It begins with the premise of tapping into student curiosity and allowing them to create, test and re-create until they eventually ship what they made to a real audience (sometimes global but often local). Design thinking isn't a subject or a topic or a class. It's more of way of solving problems that encourages risk-taking and creativity.

Design thinking is a flexible framework for getting the most out of the creative process. It is used in the arts, in engineering, in the corporate world, and in social and civic spaces. You can use it in every subject with every age group. It works when creating digital content or when building things with duct tape and cardboard.

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Kathy Lynch's curator insight, February 17, 11:04 PM

Thx John Evans!

davidconover's curator insight, March 7, 5:00 AM
H

In what ways are you using this valuable process in your classroom, your corporate board room or in life?
 
April Ross Media's curator insight, March 13, 9:02 AM
Design Thinking in Every Classroom
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Developing and Maintaining a Growth Mindset - The Learner's Way

Developing and Maintaining a Growth Mindset - The Learner's Way | Educational | Scoop.it
For educators, parents and learners Carol Dweck’s research on the benefits of a Growth Mindset is naturally appealing. Those who have a growth mindset achieve better results than those who don’t, are more resilient and accept challenge willingly. In response schools have embraced the notion and classroom walls are adorned with posters identifying the characteristics of growth versus fixed mindsets. Teachers make efforts to shift their students towards a growth mindset and parents consider how they may assist in the process. After two years of incorporating a growth mindset philosophy we are finding that the reality of shifting a student’s disposition away from a fixed mindset and then maintaining a growth mindset is significantly more complex than at first imagined. Numerous forces and influences play a role and progress is unlikely to match a linear curve.

Where schools have made steps in the right direction, is in raising awareness of the two mindsets. In this regard the placement of posters and discussion around the role that our mindset has in our learning are steps in the right direction. Demonising the fixed mindset is perhaps an unnecessary step and our students may be better served by understanding that we all have times when we fall into a fixed mindset. Education of how we may recognise such times and apply strategies of mindfulness and metacognition would avoid shifting already vulnerable learners on to the circle of shame. Awareness is however far form the end of the journey towards reaping the benefits of a Growth Mindset.

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Victor Ventura's curator insight, February 9, 8:16 AM

Carol Dweck's "Growth Mindset" is now on my list for must reads.

Koen Mattheeuws's curator insight, February 10, 3:36 AM

Weten dat er een fixed en growth mindset bestaat is niet genoeg. Om jongeren te coachen opdat ze zelf denken vanuit een groei-mindset  moeten we doelbewust en evenwichtig feedback hanteren.

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35 Psychology-Based Learning Strategies For Deeper Learning

35 Psychology-Based Learning Strategies For Deeper Learning | Educational | Scoop.it
Have you ever considered letting your students listen to hardcore punk while they take their mid-term exam? Decided to do away with Power Point presentations during your lectures? Urged your students to memorize more in order to remember more? If the answer is no, you may want to rethink your notions of psychology and its place in the learning environment.

Here are 35 critical thinking strategies, straight from the mind of Sigmund Freud.

Via John Evans
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Daniel Jimenez Zulic's curator insight, August 5, 6:21 PM
i dont know if Freud had some credit here, but these strategies make sense 
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BusyTeacher: Free Printable Worksheets For Busy English Teachers

BusyTeacher: Free Printable Worksheets For Busy English Teachers | Educational | Scoop.it
Free printable worksheets and lesson plans for every busy teacher. Find printable worksheets on any topic: vocabulary, grammar, listening, reading, writing and speaking!

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Nik Peachey's curator insight, July 18, 1:10 AM

A great resource for teachers.

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Nigel Coutts: The Future of Education

Nigel Coutts: The Future of Education | Educational | Scoop.it
From a convergence of technology, understandings of how we learn and from an understanding of new purposes for education the most consistent message is that education must increasing become learner centred. Our goal must be to put the learner at the centre of our understanding and they must be the focus of all we do.

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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, July 10, 2:01 PM

"Put the learner at the centre" ~ Nigel Coutts puts his finger on it for the 21st Century.  A student at the center must be a learning agent. To be so, a student must learn how to learn.

 

The skyline of Florence reminds me that the silos of learning in today's universities haven't changed much since the renaissance. We still operate within our discipline while the world around us demands flexibility and the ability to to learn on demand. 

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Engaging Students vs. Empowering Students | Grow. Lead. Serve.

Engaging Students vs. Empowering Students | Grow. Lead. Serve. | Educational | Scoop.it
I truly believe in the work of George Couros and "The Innovator's Mindset." For example, I am now reading "The Innovator's Mindset" for the second time and interestingly enough different points have now stood out to me. An element that George mentions is the difference between "engaging" students and "empowering" students. Through the differentiation that George made between the two concepts, I started reflecting on intangible and tangible results that I experienced in the classroom.

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Becoming Innovative: 15 New Ideas Every Teacher Should Try -

Becoming Innovative: 15 New Ideas Every Teacher Should Try - | Educational | Scoop.it
What are the latest emerging trends in education?

As trends to do, these are changing almost yearly. Consider how quiet iPads in the classroom have been recently, whereas three years ago they were going to replace teachers and were (unsarcastically) compared to magic. While mobile devices like the iPad can indeed parallel a kind of magic in the learning process, it obviously has to ‘fit’ into a progressive supporting ecology of assessment, curriculum, and instruction.

With that in mind, we’ve created a list of 15 (the graphic plus 3 bonus items below) new ideas every teacher should try. Not all will fit or work–again, it depends on the ecology of the classroom, school, and so on. But each of these ideas below–some learning models, some concepts, and some technologies–can be transformational for students, and your teaching.

Via John Evans
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Rhi Parkes's curator insight, June 2, 8:18 AM
Different ways to look at a classroom and interaction with students.
Susan McDonald's curator insight, June 3, 3:05 AM
This really is a good little framework to use as a 'to do' list in future planning. The implicit message is that ICTs alone won't fix your problems, but combine them with innovative teaching approaches and unit structures and fit them to the 'ecology' of your school and class, and you will be getting close!
Hollie Brassington's curator insight, June 3, 6:51 AM
This is a fantastic summary of ways to transform learning - in fact the PBL and Skype examples in combination with the current hot topic in the news about the value and virtues of allrefugees (Karl Stefanovic on WIN Today show)  makes me think I could devise an English  Unit on refugees where students interact through  these digital pedagogical tools  with actual refugees now in Australia to find out their stories and to hear about racial prejudice towards 'boat people', and then write a letter to the editor type assessment dispelling the negativities towards refugees via an online newspaper or blog situation. These could be shared with actual refugees to show them they have the support of Australian citizens....
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Teachers: Embrace the Full Potential of Technology Education Through Creation

Teachers: Embrace the Full Potential of Technology Education Through Creation | Educational | Scoop.it
Embracing technology in the classroom can be as simple as sharing assignments via Google Docs or posting lessons on YouTube to study. However, the most engagement and learning will come when students are encouraged to create, not just consume, using technology.

Via Nik Peachey
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Nik Peachey's curator insight, April 26, 8:01 AM

Yes. The part about students creating with the computer is the really important part.

Dinah Galligo's curator insight, May 9, 4:20 AM
Encourager la création des élèves grâce à la technologie et pas seulement la consommation
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12 Common Reasons Students Don't Read & What You Can Do About It -

12 Common Reasons Students Don't Read & What You Can Do About It - | Educational | Scoop.it
Why don’t students read more?

Digital distractions? No books at home? Too much testing? Kim Kardashian? It depends on the student. It depends on illiteracy vs aliteracy. It depends on how you define reading (does reading long-winded character dialogues in Square Enix games count?) So below, I’ve gathered some of the most common reasons students don’t read, and provided some ways you can begin to address that issue.

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Newsela | Nonfiction Literacy and Current Events

Newsela | Nonfiction Literacy and Current Events | Educational | Scoop.it
Unlimited access to hundreds of leveled news articles and Common Core–aligned quizzes, with new articles every day.

Via Nik Peachey
Cecilia Di Felice's insight:

Great free resource for developing reading skills.

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Andrew J Gibson's curator insight, April 4, 8:48 AM

Great free resource for developing reading skills.

TL Cafe's curator insight, April 4, 10:51 PM

Great free resource for developing reading skills.

Alexandra Koukoumialou's curator insight, April 5, 3:29 AM

Great free resource for developing reading skills.

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The Real Irish-American Story Not Taught in Schools

The Real Irish-American Story Not Taught in Schools | Educational | Scoop.it

"The crop failure in Ireland affected only the potato—during the worst famine years, other food production was robust. Michael Pollan notes in The Botany of Desire, 'Ireland’s was surely the biggest experiment in monoculture ever attempted and surely the most convincing proof of its folly.' But if only this one variety of potato, the Lumper, failed, and other crops thrived, why did people starve?  Thomas Gallagher points out in Paddy’s Lament, that during the first winter of famine, 1846-47, as perhaps 400,000 Irish peasants starved, landlords exported 17 million pounds sterling worth of grain, cattle, pigs, flour, eggs, and poultry—food that could have prevented those deaths. Throughout the famine, as Gallagher notes, there was an abundance of food produced in Ireland, yet the landlords exported it to markets abroad."


Via Seth Dixon
Cecilia Di Felice's insight:

I teach my students that famines reflect a lack of power (political and economic) more so than they are indicative of an absence of food in that region.  The Irish potato famine exemplifies the three main causes of food insecurity: 

1. Redirection of food

2. Destruction of capacity to grow food

3. neglect of the starving

 

Images 13 and 14 in this blogpost powerfully highlight that the famine was not an accident, but the result of a deliberate British policy. 

 

Tags: Ireland, food, economic, colonialism, poverty.

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Brien Shanahan's curator insight, March 24, 10:04 AM

I teach my students that famines reflect a lack of power (political and economic) more so than they are indicative of an absence of food in that region.  The Irish potato famine exemplifies the three main causes of food insecurity: 

1. Redirection of food

2. Destruction of capacity to grow food

3. neglect of the starving

 

Images 13 and 14 in this blogpost powerfully highlight that the famine was not an accident, but the result of a deliberate British policy. 

 

Tags: Ireland, food, economic, colonialism, poverty.

ismokuhanen's curator insight, March 27, 7:32 AM

I teach my students that famines reflect a lack of power (political and economic) more so than they are indicative of an absence of food in that region.  The Irish potato famine exemplifies the three main causes of food insecurity: 

1. Redirection of food

2. Destruction of capacity to grow food

3. neglect of the starving

 

Images 13 and 14 in this blogpost powerfully highlight that the famine was not an accident, but the result of a deliberate British policy. 

 

Tags: Ireland, food, economic, colonialism, poverty.

Bob Zavitz's curator insight, March 28, 7:05 PM

I teach my students that famines reflect a lack of power (political and economic) more so than they are indicative of an absence of food in that region.  The Irish potato famine exemplifies the three main causes of food insecurity: 

1. Redirection of food

2. Destruction of capacity to grow food

3. neglect of the starving

 

Images 13 and 14 in this blogpost powerfully highlight that the famine was not an accident, but the result of a deliberate British policy. 

 

Tags: Ireland, food, economic, colonialism, poverty.

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What Makes a Teacher Special to a Student? - MindShift

What Makes a Teacher Special to a Student? - MindShift | Educational | Scoop.it
Great teachers are constantly evaluating what works to help their students learn. But teachers don’t often hear what impact they have made on students.

In a rare treat, we hear from one former student reading from a journal he kept during middle school. Patrick Don wrote several journal entries about his favorite teacher, Mr. Albert, who grew to become his friend. Don read some of these entries on stage at a Mortified Live event in Baltimore, and this reading was turned into a Mortified podcast episode, “Tribute To Teachers’ Pets.”

Via John Evans
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Victor Ventura's curator insight, March 8, 5:12 PM
Should be a goal of every teacher-be a hero to others!
Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, March 22, 12:29 PM
The student-teacher relationship cannot be underestimated.
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9 Ways To Help Students Learn Through Their Mistakes - TeachThought

9 Ways To Help Students Learn Through Their Mistakes - TeachThought | Educational | Scoop.it
Most people have heard the sayings “You learn from your mistakes” or “Adversity is the school of wisdom“. Meanwhile, it is a general consensus that making mistakes is an important part of the learning process. This is because if, instead of giving up in frustration after making a mistake, we work constructively to understand the mistake, the strategy to solve the problem stays with us better than if we just memorize the solution.

Despite this, in our educational system, mistakes are more often punished than seen as an opportunity to learn. What then can we do to help our students learn from their mistakes? First, let’s take a look at how mistakes can stimulate the learning process.

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Victor Ventura's curator insight, February 24, 8:19 AM

If you agree with the statement, "you learn from your mistakes," then this is a good read. I agree with 1 thru 9.

Koen Mattheeuws's curator insight, February 26, 10:27 AM

Elke fout biedt een kans tot leren. Hier lees je negen manieren om die kans te creëren. 

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From Book Creator to printed book - Book Creator app | Blog

From Book Creator to printed book - Book Creator app | Blog | Educational | Scoop.it
I have been making printed versions of books made with Book Creator on an iPad for many years. The app produces a really decent file for hard copy printing.

First thing to realise is that your video and sound files won’t work on paper. I know that sounds silly but people sometimes get upset when they first realise this. What you do get is a paper book which looks like it was purchased from a bookstore – it looks so professional.

Via John Evans
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Claudia Estrada's curator insight, February 16, 2:29 PM

If we are giving the students the skills for their future jobs, this might be a tool to consider.  It has been out there for a while but using it on an iPad could be exciting for children and teens.