Educational
67 views | +0 today
Follow
 
Rescooped by Cecilia Di Felice from Professional Learning for Busy Educators
onto Educational
Scoop.it!

A Simple, Open-Ended Assignment: Explain When You're Creative - TeachThought

A Simple, Open-Ended Assignment: Explain When You're Creative - TeachThought | Educational | Scoop.it

- TeachThough"Below is an assignment recently given to a 10th grade classroom. The assignment was inspired by Ken Robinson’s The Element.

As you may remember, Ken Robinson defines The Element in the first book you read earlier this year with the same name. Within that text he explains that we all have talents and gifts. When those talents and gifts work in concert with our passions, we are functioning within a productive, sweet spot called The Element.

He firmly believes that we are all capable of being creative, and he reaffirms that within this book. He also criticizes schools (that often separate arts from core subjects) and workplace environments that notoriously stifle the natural, creative juices we all possess."

 

 


Via John Evans
more...
Gilda Macedo's curator insight, March 29, 2014 11:15 PM

A escola precisa rever seu papel social pois servir ao sistema enquanto máquina motriz da sociedade não corresponde  mais aos anseios pessoais dos cidadãos, que rejeita, mesmo inconscientemente, ao seu formato curricular aristotélico.

Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Cecilia Di Felice from Learning Technology News
Scoop.it!

Teachers: Embrace the Full Potential of Technology Education Through Creation

Teachers: Embrace the Full Potential of Technology Education Through Creation | Educational | Scoop.it
Embracing technology in the classroom can be as simple as sharing assignments via Google Docs or posting lessons on YouTube to study. However, the most engagement and learning will come when students are encouraged to create, not just consume, using technology.

Via Nik Peachey
more...
Nik Peachey's curator insight, April 26, 8:01 AM

Yes. The part about students creating with the computer is the really important part.

Rescooped by Cecilia Di Felice from Professional Learning for Busy Educators
Scoop.it!

12 Common Reasons Students Don't Read & What You Can Do About It -

12 Common Reasons Students Don't Read & What You Can Do About It - | Educational | Scoop.it
Why don’t students read more?

Digital distractions? No books at home? Too much testing? Kim Kardashian? It depends on the student. It depends on illiteracy vs aliteracy. It depends on how you define reading (does reading long-winded character dialogues in Square Enix games count?) So below, I’ve gathered some of the most common reasons students don’t read, and provided some ways you can begin to address that issue.

Via John Evans
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Cecilia Di Felice from Tools for Teachers & Learners
Scoop.it!

Newsela | Nonfiction Literacy and Current Events

Newsela | Nonfiction Literacy and Current Events | Educational | Scoop.it
Unlimited access to hundreds of leveled news articles and Common Core–aligned quizzes, with new articles every day.

Via Nik Peachey
Cecilia Di Felice's insight:

Great free resource for developing reading skills.

more...
Andrew J Gibson's curator insight, April 4, 8:48 AM

Great free resource for developing reading skills.

TL Cafe's curator insight, April 4, 10:51 PM

Great free resource for developing reading skills.

Alexandra Koukoumialou's curator insight, April 5, 3:29 AM

Great free resource for developing reading skills.

Rescooped by Cecilia Di Felice from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Real Irish-American Story Not Taught in Schools

The Real Irish-American Story Not Taught in Schools | Educational | Scoop.it

"The crop failure in Ireland affected only the potato—during the worst famine years, other food production was robust. Michael Pollan notes in The Botany of Desire, 'Ireland’s was surely the biggest experiment in monoculture ever attempted and surely the most convincing proof of its folly.' But if only this one variety of potato, the Lumper, failed, and other crops thrived, why did people starve?  Thomas Gallagher points out in Paddy’s Lament, that during the first winter of famine, 1846-47, as perhaps 400,000 Irish peasants starved, landlords exported 17 million pounds sterling worth of grain, cattle, pigs, flour, eggs, and poultry—food that could have prevented those deaths. Throughout the famine, as Gallagher notes, there was an abundance of food produced in Ireland, yet the landlords exported it to markets abroad."


Via Seth Dixon
Cecilia Di Felice's insight:

I teach my students that famines reflect a lack of power (political and economic) more so than they are indicative of an absence of food in that region.  The Irish potato famine exemplifies the three main causes of food insecurity: 

1. Redirection of food

2. Destruction of capacity to grow food

3. neglect of the starving

 

Images 13 and 14 in this blogpost powerfully highlight that the famine was not an accident, but the result of a deliberate British policy. 

 

Tags: Ireland, food, economic, colonialism, poverty.

more...
Brien Shanahan's curator insight, March 24, 10:04 AM

I teach my students that famines reflect a lack of power (political and economic) more so than they are indicative of an absence of food in that region.  The Irish potato famine exemplifies the three main causes of food insecurity: 

1. Redirection of food

2. Destruction of capacity to grow food

3. neglect of the starving

 

Images 13 and 14 in this blogpost powerfully highlight that the famine was not an accident, but the result of a deliberate British policy. 

 

Tags: Ireland, food, economic, colonialism, poverty.

ismokuhanen's curator insight, March 27, 7:32 AM

I teach my students that famines reflect a lack of power (political and economic) more so than they are indicative of an absence of food in that region.  The Irish potato famine exemplifies the three main causes of food insecurity: 

1. Redirection of food

2. Destruction of capacity to grow food

3. neglect of the starving

 

Images 13 and 14 in this blogpost powerfully highlight that the famine was not an accident, but the result of a deliberate British policy. 

 

Tags: Ireland, food, economic, colonialism, poverty.

Bob Zavitz's curator insight, March 28, 7:05 PM

I teach my students that famines reflect a lack of power (political and economic) more so than they are indicative of an absence of food in that region.  The Irish potato famine exemplifies the three main causes of food insecurity: 

1. Redirection of food

2. Destruction of capacity to grow food

3. neglect of the starving

 

Images 13 and 14 in this blogpost powerfully highlight that the famine was not an accident, but the result of a deliberate British policy. 

 

Tags: Ireland, food, economic, colonialism, poverty.

Rescooped by Cecilia Di Felice from Professional Learning for Busy Educators
Scoop.it!

What Makes a Teacher Special to a Student? - MindShift

What Makes a Teacher Special to a Student? - MindShift | Educational | Scoop.it
Great teachers are constantly evaluating what works to help their students learn. But teachers don’t often hear what impact they have made on students.

In a rare treat, we hear from one former student reading from a journal he kept during middle school. Patrick Don wrote several journal entries about his favorite teacher, Mr. Albert, who grew to become his friend. Don read some of these entries on stage at a Mortified Live event in Baltimore, and this reading was turned into a Mortified podcast episode, “Tribute To Teachers’ Pets.”

Via John Evans
more...
Victor Ventura's curator insight, March 8, 5:12 PM
Should be a goal of every teacher-be a hero to others!
Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, March 22, 12:29 PM
The student-teacher relationship cannot be underestimated.
Rescooped by Cecilia Di Felice from Professional Learning for Busy Educators
Scoop.it!

9 Ways To Help Students Learn Through Their Mistakes - TeachThought

9 Ways To Help Students Learn Through Their Mistakes - TeachThought | Educational | Scoop.it
Most people have heard the sayings “You learn from your mistakes” or “Adversity is the school of wisdom“. Meanwhile, it is a general consensus that making mistakes is an important part of the learning process. This is because if, instead of giving up in frustration after making a mistake, we work constructively to understand the mistake, the strategy to solve the problem stays with us better than if we just memorize the solution.

Despite this, in our educational system, mistakes are more often punished than seen as an opportunity to learn. What then can we do to help our students learn from their mistakes? First, let’s take a look at how mistakes can stimulate the learning process.

Via John Evans
more...
Victor Ventura's curator insight, February 24, 8:19 AM

If you agree with the statement, "you learn from your mistakes," then this is a good read. I agree with 1 thru 9.

Koen Mattheeuws's curator insight, February 26, 10:27 AM

Elke fout biedt een kans tot leren. Hier lees je negen manieren om die kans te creëren. 

Rescooped by Cecilia Di Felice from iPads, MakerEd and More in Education
Scoop.it!

From Book Creator to printed book - Book Creator app | Blog

From Book Creator to printed book - Book Creator app | Blog | Educational | Scoop.it
I have been making printed versions of books made with Book Creator on an iPad for many years. The app produces a really decent file for hard copy printing.

First thing to realise is that your video and sound files won’t work on paper. I know that sounds silly but people sometimes get upset when they first realise this. What you do get is a paper book which looks like it was purchased from a bookstore – it looks so professional.

Via John Evans
more...
Claudia Estrada's curator insight, February 16, 2:29 PM

If we are giving the students the skills for their future jobs, this might be a tool to consider.  It has been out there for a while but using it on an iPad could be exciting for children and teens.  

Rescooped by Cecilia Di Felice from Professional Learning for Busy Educators
Scoop.it!

10 Team-Building Games That Promote Collaborative Critical Thinking - TeachThought

10 Team-Building Games That Promote Collaborative Critical Thinking - TeachThought | Educational | Scoop.it
Yes, there are mounds of curricula they must master in a wide breadth of subjects, but education does not begin and end with a textbook or test. Other skills must be honed, too, not the least of which is how to get along with their peers and work well with others. This is not something that can be cultivated through rote memorization or with strategically placed posters.

Students must be engaged and cooperation must be practiced, and often. The following team-building games can promote cooperation and communication, help establish a positive classroom environment and — most importantly — provide a fun, much-needed reprieve from routine.

Via John Evans
more...
Sylvianne Parent's curator insight, February 16, 4:17 PM

Il est difficile pour les élèves dysphasiques de développer ses habiletés sans enseignement explicite. Dans le cadre d'un jeu, l'engagement et l'intérêt peut être un élément facilitateur.  À explorer!

Victor Ventura's curator insight, February 23, 8:06 AM

Team building is important to you and your students. Check these strategies out.

Rescooped by Cecilia Di Felice from E-Learning and Online Teaching
Scoop.it!

The Future of eLearning Infographic - e-Learning Infographics

The Future of eLearning Infographic - e-Learning Infographics | Educational | Scoop.it
Here is a peek into the future of eLearning. The possibilities are endless, and The Future of eLearning Infographic highlights some of them.

Via Dennis T OConnor
more...
Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, January 9, 1:58 PM

See the big picture - all in one infographic.  Where to you fit in?

Rescooped by Cecilia Di Felice from iPads, MakerEd and More in Education
Scoop.it!

25 awesome apps for teachers, recommended by teachers - TED-Ed

25 awesome apps for teachers, recommended by teachers - TED-Ed | Educational | Scoop.it
What are the best apps for teachers? We asked TED-Ed Innovative Educators and the TED-Ed community. Below, 25 awesome apps recommended for teachers, by teachers.

Via John Evans
more...
Willem Kuypers's curator insight, December 4, 2015 3:07 AM

Les applications sont sécondaires dans la pédagogie, mais sans elles on ne peut y arriver. Voilà une belle liste.

ManufacturingStories's curator insight, December 4, 2015 5:04 PM

#Education #Apps #iPad

Scott Langston's curator insight, December 4, 2015 8:03 PM

I've gone through the 'download every new app and try to play with it' phase and now rarely seek out new apps. From time to time though, it's good to see what other professionals are recommending and using...

Rescooped by Cecilia Di Felice from Professional Learning for Busy Educators
Scoop.it!

12 Strategies For Creating An Atmosphere Of Problem-Solving In Your Classroom

12 Strategies For Creating An Atmosphere Of Problem-Solving In Your Classroom | Educational | Scoop.it

Via John Evans
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Cecilia Di Felice from Professional Learning for Busy Educators
Scoop.it!

12 Strategies For Creating An Atmosphere Of Problem-Solving In Your Classroom

12 Strategies For Creating An Atmosphere Of Problem-Solving In Your Classroom | Educational | Scoop.it

Via John Evans
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Cecilia Di Felice from Professional Learning for Busy Educators
Scoop.it!

How Games Naturally Promote A Growth Mindset - TeachThought

How Games Naturally Promote A Growth Mindset - TeachThought | Educational | Scoop.it
Let’s face it: our students are playing games. Lots of them. It’s easy to vilify games and say they are the cause of shorter attention spans and behavior issues, but for better or worse, games are not going anywhere. As educators, we have the chance to tap into a movement that has captivated our students’ attention. By incorporating games and using the language of games in the classroom, we can shift students’ thinking so the resilient behavior demonstrated while playing a game transfers to the process of learning.

In a growth mindset, there are larger factors than the outcome. Progress and growth are acknowledged as valuable in the learning process. This is directly in line with our students’ relationship to games. They generally play games to win, of course, but mostly the point of playing a game is to play. They enjoy the experience of the game, and then there is an outcome. With this in mind, it’s not such a leap from a sandbox game (like Minecraft) to the sandbox that is art class. Yes, the final product is important, but how we get there is also of great importance. In any class, educators hope that students value the content, but also the very process of learning and thinking. We can spark excitement about learning by adopting a game mentality.

Via John Evans
more...
Naomi Nuñez Ponce's curator insight, November 12, 2015 6:48 PM

Mi nuevo reto es llevar el juego al aula. Es hora de investigar jugando

Koen Mattheeuws's curator insight, November 16, 2015 2:31 AM

Ik was vorige week in een school waar een groep gemotiveerde leerkrachten hun collega's proberen overtuigen om activerende en coöperatieve werkvormen te hanteren. Daarbij botsen ze geregeld op het argument dat ze geen 'spellekes' in de klas willen. Jammer dat deze leerkrachten de speelse component van een werkvorm verwarren met een spel. En eigenlijk helemaal fout als je weet hoe (leer)rijk 'een spel' is. Dit artikel viel enkele dagen geleden in mijn mailbox en versterkt me in de overtuiging dat leren op talrijke manieren kan. Dus ook als spelend en via games.

Rescooped by Cecilia Di Felice from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Top 250 Global Attractions - How many have you seen?

Top 250 Global Attractions - How many have you seen? | Educational | Scoop.it

"The ultimate list of the greatest wonders in the world."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 10, 7:51 PM

I have been fortunate enough to have visited 53 of the places on this list (I have gaping holes in my list and the list itself has some gaping holes itself).  All lists are highly subjective; this list, for example, is heay on urban/cultural/European tourism sites and light on physical/Asian/African destinations.  Most geographers already have enough reasons to go traveling, but this list might spark more.  Who wants to map out these places to verify that initial impression? 

 

Questions to Ponder: Which places are on your dream list?  Which places do you think should have been added to this list?  

 

Tags: place, tourismculture, landscape, geo-inspiration.

Ken Feltman's curator insight, April 19, 8:13 AM
Where in the world have you been?
Michael MacNeil's curator insight, April 19, 4:47 PM
Share your insight
Rescooped by Cecilia Di Felice from E-Learning and Online Teaching
Scoop.it!

Helping Kids find what they seek: Avoiding "Learned Helplessness"

Helping Kids find what they seek: Avoiding "Learned Helplessness" | Educational | Scoop.it
Curate and Create Learning Resources

If we want to have students seek out other information from sources other than the teacher, then we must make sure those resources are available. Many teachers using the flipped classroom approach already have created or found these kinds of resources. However, think broadly about the word resource. People are resources, texts are resources, and community organizations are resources -- to name just a few categories. We have to be comfortable not always knowing the answer, and instead suggesting we find the answer together through the vast amount of learning resources that we have at our disposal. Try curating these resources before, during, and after a unit. Work with students as well to create a culture where the answers are everywhere.

Via Dennis T OConnor
more...
Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, April 4, 12:31 PM

Knowing how to ask questions will help anyone find what they seek. Why not start young?

Alexandria Yaxley's curator insight, April 27, 1:49 PM
A
Aha!
 
Rescooped by Cecilia Di Felice from Professional Learning for Busy Educators
Scoop.it!

52 Of Our Favorite Inspirational Quotes For Teachers - TeachThought

52 Of Our Favorite Inspirational Quotes For Teachers - TeachThought | Educational | Scoop.it
We’ve dug through dozens of books, teacher magazines, pinterest boards, and other blogs to find 52 of our favorite inspirational quotes for teachers. We’ve tried to come up with a range of ways of thinking about teaching and learning without resorting to the most cliche lines you’ve heard again and again.

Some of these you’ve likely heard before, but hopefully the bulk of them are both new, and capable of that extra push when you need it.

Via John Evans
more...
Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, March 29, 9:34 AM
These are quotes that do not go out of style.
Lynnette Van Dyke's curator insight, March 29, 9:28 PM
These are quotes that do not go out of style.
Rescooped by Cecilia Di Felice from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

How ‘Ugly’ Fruits and Vegetables Can Help Solve World Hunger

How ‘Ugly’ Fruits and Vegetables Can Help Solve World Hunger | Educational | Scoop.it
About a third of the planet’s food goes to waste, often because of its looks. That’s enough to feed two billion people.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Katerina Stojanovski's curator insight, March 10, 6:10 AM

No one should be surprised that more developed societies are more wasteful societies.  It is not just personal wasting of food at the house and restaurants that are the problem.  Perfectly edible food is thrown out due to size (smaller than standards but perfectly normal), cosmetics (Bananas that are shaped 'funny') and costumer preference (discarded bread crust).  This is an intriguing perceptive on our consumptive culture, but it also is helpful in framing issues such as sustainability and human and environmental interactions.  In a technologically advanced societies that are often removed form the land where the food they eat originates, food waste needs to made more explicit. 

 

Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, unit 5 agriculture.

NADINE BURCHI SCORP's curator insight, March 10, 1:24 PM

No one should be surprised that more developed societies are more wasteful societies.  It is not just personal wasting of food at the house and restaurants that are the problem.  Perfectly edible food is thrown out due to size (smaller than standards but perfectly normal), cosmetics (Bananas that are shaped 'funny') and costumer preference (discarded bread crust).  This is an intriguing perceptive on our consumptive culture, but it also is helpful in framing issues such as sustainability and human and environmental interactions.  In a technologically advanced societies that are often removed form the land where the food they eat originates, food waste needs to made more explicit. 


Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, unit 5 agriculture.

Dawn Haas Tache's curator insight, March 11, 9:29 PM
Share your insight
Rescooped by Cecilia Di Felice from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Interactives about Syrian Refugee Crisis

Interactives about Syrian Refugee Crisis | Educational | Scoop.it
War, sectarian violence, and famine have forced more than 50 million people from their homes—the largest number of displaced people since World War II.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Jukka Melaranta's curator insight, March 3, 10:40 AM

Here are two excellent ESRI StoryMaps about the Syrian refugee crisis; these are two very good examples of a great web maps. 

 

Tags: GIS, ESRI, mapping, cartography, geospatial, edtech, Syria, political, refugees.

malbert's curator insight, March 4, 1:30 AM

Here are two excellent ESRI StoryMaps about the Syrian refugee crisis; these are two very good examples of a great web maps. 

'The Uprooted' (focused more on Syria).
Epicenter of a Deepening Refugee Crisis (puts Syria into larger global patterns).

 

Tags: GIS, ESRI, mapping, cartography, geospatial, edtech, Syria, political, refugees.

Rachel Stutzman's curator insight, March 11, 10:28 AM

Here are two excellent ESRI StoryMaps about the Syrian refugee crisis; these are two very good examples of a great web maps. 

'The Uprooted' (focused more on Syria).
Epicenter of a Deepening Refugee Crisis (puts Syria into larger global patterns).

 

Tags: GIS, ESRI, mapping, cartography, geospatial, edtech, Syria, political, refugees.

Rescooped by Cecilia Di Felice from iPads, MakerEd and More in Education
Scoop.it!

Curious About Design Thinking? Here's a Framework You Can Use in Any Classroom with Any Age Group | John Spencer

Curious About Design Thinking? Here's a Framework You Can Use in Any Classroom with Any Age Group | John Spencer | Educational | Scoop.it
The term "design thinking" is often attached to maker spaces and STEM labs. However, design thinking is bigger than STEM. It begins with the premise of tapping into student curiosity and allowing them to create, test and re-create until they eventually ship what they made to a real audience (sometimes global but often local). Design thinking isn't a subject or a topic or a class. It's more of way of solving problems that encourages risk-taking and creativity.

Design thinking is a flexible framework for getting the most out of the creative process. It is used in the arts, in engineering, in the corporate world, and in social and civic spaces. You can use it in every subject with every age group. It works when creating digital content or when building things with duct tape and cardboard.

Via John Evans
more...
Kathy Lynch's curator insight, February 17, 11:04 PM

Thx John Evans!

davidconover's curator insight, March 7, 5:00 AM
H

In what ways are you using this valuable process in your classroom, your corporate board room or in life?
 
April Ross Media's curator insight, March 13, 9:02 AM
Design Thinking in Every Classroom
Rescooped by Cecilia Di Felice from Professional Learning for Busy Educators
Scoop.it!

Developing and Maintaining a Growth Mindset - The Learner's Way

Developing and Maintaining a Growth Mindset - The Learner's Way | Educational | Scoop.it
For educators, parents and learners Carol Dweck’s research on the benefits of a Growth Mindset is naturally appealing. Those who have a growth mindset achieve better results than those who don’t, are more resilient and accept challenge willingly. In response schools have embraced the notion and classroom walls are adorned with posters identifying the characteristics of growth versus fixed mindsets. Teachers make efforts to shift their students towards a growth mindset and parents consider how they may assist in the process. After two years of incorporating a growth mindset philosophy we are finding that the reality of shifting a student’s disposition away from a fixed mindset and then maintaining a growth mindset is significantly more complex than at first imagined. Numerous forces and influences play a role and progress is unlikely to match a linear curve.

Where schools have made steps in the right direction, is in raising awareness of the two mindsets. In this regard the placement of posters and discussion around the role that our mindset has in our learning are steps in the right direction. Demonising the fixed mindset is perhaps an unnecessary step and our students may be better served by understanding that we all have times when we fall into a fixed mindset. Education of how we may recognise such times and apply strategies of mindfulness and metacognition would avoid shifting already vulnerable learners on to the circle of shame. Awareness is however far form the end of the journey towards reaping the benefits of a Growth Mindset.

Via John Evans
more...
Victor Ventura's curator insight, February 9, 8:16 AM

Carol Dweck's "Growth Mindset" is now on my list for must reads.

Koen Mattheeuws's curator insight, February 10, 3:36 AM

Weten dat er een fixed en growth mindset bestaat is niet genoeg. Om jongeren te coachen opdat ze zelf denken vanuit een groei-mindset  moeten we doelbewust en evenwichtig feedback hanteren.

Rescooped by Cecilia Di Felice from Tools for Teachers & Learners
Scoop.it!

Analyze My Writing

Analyze My Writing | Educational | Scoop.it
An Online Writing Sample Content and Readability Analyzer: analyze your writing and get statistics on words you use most frequently, word and sentence length, readability, punctuation usage, and more.

Via Nik Peachey
more...
Monica Jan's curator insight, January 23, 6:19 PM

This might be used as a useful writing analysis tool to find out the features of EFL writing. 

David Rowbotham's curator insight, March 18, 7:46 AM

This looks a bit messy but has some useful features. It can pull out colocations and create close tests, so can be a real time saver.

Dennis Swender's curator insight, March 19, 10:12 AM

This looks a bit messy but has some useful features. It can pull out colocations and create close tests, so can be a real time saver.

Scooped by Cecilia Di Felice
Scoop.it!

Are we better off than we think?

"Despite global inequalities, most of the world is better off than you think - and better off than it has ever been before.  Watch Hans Rosling explain why."


Tags: media, models, gapminder, development, perspective.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Cecilia Di Felice from Digital Delights for Learners
Scoop.it!

20 Best Google Education Resources for Teachers

20 Best Google Education Resources for Teachers | Educational | Scoop.it
20 Google education resources every teacher should have nearby.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
more...
Jerry Busone's curator insight, December 2, 2015 9:05 AM
Access to some really good Apps that everyone can find uses for...
Angela Ribo's curator insight, December 2, 2015 9:50 AM

This is certainly something I need to learn more about!

ManufacturingStories's curator insight, December 2, 2015 1:13 PM

#Google #Apps #EdChat #TechEd #EdTech

Rescooped by Cecilia Di Felice from iPads, MakerEd and More in Education
Scoop.it!

Be the Learner Your Kids Need @Venspired

Be the Learner Your Kids Need  @Venspired | Educational | Scoop.it

"Either way you look at it, teachers are learners and when we let our students know that, we empower them to be learners, too. "


Via John Evans
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Cecilia Di Felice from Professional Learning for Busy Educators
Scoop.it!

Why Teaching Is The Best Job In The World - TeachThought

Why Teaching Is The Best Job In The World - TeachThought | Educational | Scoop.it
Sometimes, good teachers quit. Teaching is an increasingly demanding job with divergent influences, dynamic sources of innovation, and aging dogma that makes it all a struggle. It can be emotionally draining, and at times, impossible.

But in lieu of that–and in an age where start-ups are glorified, entertainment is endlessly emphasized, and tech is kind, teaching continues to be the best job in the world. Or at least I think so anyway. Here are 7 reasons why.

Via John Evans
more...
Isabel's curator insight, November 13, 2015 11:23 AM

añada su visión ...