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Rescooped by Cecilia Di Felice from Geography Education
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How ‘Ugly’ Fruits and Vegetables Can Help Solve World Hunger

How ‘Ugly’ Fruits and Vegetables Can Help Solve World Hunger | Educational | Scoop.it
About a third of the planet’s food goes to waste, often because of its looks. That’s enough to feed two billion people.

Via Seth Dixon
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Katerina Stojanovski's curator insight, March 10, 2016 6:10 AM

No one should be surprised that more developed societies are more wasteful societies.  It is not just personal wasting of food at the house and restaurants that are the problem.  Perfectly edible food is thrown out due to size (smaller than standards but perfectly normal), cosmetics (Bananas that are shaped 'funny') and costumer preference (discarded bread crust).  This is an intriguing perceptive on our consumptive culture, but it also is helpful in framing issues such as sustainability and human and environmental interactions.  In a technologically advanced societies that are often removed form the land where the food they eat originates, food waste needs to made more explicit. 

 

Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, unit 5 agriculture.

NADINE BURCHI SCORP's curator insight, March 10, 2016 1:24 PM

No one should be surprised that more developed societies are more wasteful societies.  It is not just personal wasting of food at the house and restaurants that are the problem.  Perfectly edible food is thrown out due to size (smaller than standards but perfectly normal), cosmetics (Bananas that are shaped 'funny') and costumer preference (discarded bread crust).  This is an intriguing perceptive on our consumptive culture, but it also is helpful in framing issues such as sustainability and human and environmental interactions.  In a technologically advanced societies that are often removed form the land where the food they eat originates, food waste needs to made more explicit. 


Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, unit 5 agriculture.

Dawn Haas Tache's curator insight, March 11, 2016 9:29 PM
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Rescooped by Cecilia Di Felice from Geography Education
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Comparing Urban Footprints

Comparing Urban Footprints | Educational | Scoop.it

"This is a series of infographics (or geo-infographics) created by Matthew Hartzell, a friend of mine that I met when we were both geography graduate students at Penn State in few years back..."


Via Seth Dixon
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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 14, 2014 3:25 PM

This is an interesting way to graph out the urban footprints of various cities from around the world. This also shows how the United States has a number of the largest urban centers in the world. Along the top, New York, Chicago, LA, and Miami are massive compared to cities like Hong Kong. This shows how in the United States there are massive amounts of urban growth. Even in China where their population is one of the worlds biggest, Hong Kong a major city only has 7.1 million. In the United States, for the past century cities have been growing and this graph shows that.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 14, 2014 6:40 PM

These visuals really help to show that the size of a city doesn't necessarily correspond with it's population. Many years ago the trend was the larger the city in turn it would posses a larger population than a physically smaller city. Today this no longer holds true, in fact many smaller cities vastly out populate large sprawling cities. Most of these mega-cities in Asia and Latin America are incredibly over build and densely packed surrounded by miles of slums. 

Edgar Manasseh Jr.'s curator insight, January 22, 2015 7:16 PM

Pretty cool.