Education S.T.E.A.M.
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Education S.T.E.A.M.
Inspiring Stories about the Need to integrate Creativity, the Arts and other Liberal Arts Subjects in K-12 Education.
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How Integrating Arts Into Other Subjects Makes Learning Come Alive

How Integrating Arts Into Other Subjects Makes Learning Come Alive | Education S.T.E.A.M. | Scoop.it
‘Arts integration seems to be the best form of differentiation out there because it taps into so many different interests and abilities and forms of learning.’
Susan Davis Cushing's insight:

Not new, but an affirming Sunday Read.

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Studio in a School Expands Arts Education Nationwide

Studio in a School Expands Arts Education Nationwide | Education S.T.E.A.M. | Scoop.it
The new Studio Institute will bring visual arts programs to schools that serve low-income families.
Susan Davis Cushing's insight:

“These are programs that can be replicated,” said Agnes Gund, the organization’s founder and chairwoman. “They have substance, they work for children in schools that don’t have many opportunities. Art is the first thing that’s cut.”"

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How to Raise a Creative Child. Step One: Back Off

How to Raise a Creative Child. Step One: Back Off | Education S.T.E.A.M. | Scoop.it

"....Evidence shows that creative contributions depend on the breadth, not just depth, of our knowledge and experience. In fashion, the most original collections come from directors who spend the most time working abroad. In science, winning a Nobel Prize is less about being a single-minded genius and more about being interested in many things. Relative to typical scientists, Nobel Prize winners are 22 times more likely to perform as actors, dancers or magicians; 12 times more likely to write poetry, plays or novels; seven times more likely to dabble in arts and crafts; and twice as likely to play an instrument or compose music.


"No one is forcing these luminary scientists to get involved in artistic hobbies. It’s a reflection of their curiosity. And sometimes, that curiosity leads them to flashes of insight. “The theory of relativity occurred to me by intuition, and music is the driving force behind this intuition,” Albert Einsteinreflected. His mother enrolled him in violin lessons starting at age 5, but he wasn’t intrigued. His love of music only blossomed as a teenager, after he stopped taking lessons and stumbled upon Mozart’s sonatas. “Love is a better teacher than a sense of duty,” he said."


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Rescooped by Susan Davis Cushing from iGeneration - 21st Century Education (Pedagogy & Digital Innovation)
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21st Century Education: Preparing Today's School for Tomorrow's Future

21st Century Education: Preparing Today's School for Tomorrow's Future | Education S.T.E.A.M. | Scoop.it
The world is changing in exponential ways due to technology. Education is not an exception. Consumers are turning into producers. Kindergarteners are turning into authors with a worldwide audience....

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Angela Ribo's curator insight, July 29, 2015 10:33 AM

Yes, it is an exciting time, but also a time with a lot to learn about how to do it well.

Tony Guzman's curator insight, July 29, 2015 11:16 AM

This article, while emphasizing on K12 sector, shares some insights from recent workshops and conferences about what today's schools need to be considering to be ready for tomorrow's learners.

Paul's curator insight, July 30, 2015 9:20 AM

I like the idea of social media being about story-telling - would like to see more of this at our school

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Examining Standardized Testing with Anya Kamenetz (Podcast)

Examining Standardized Testing with Anya Kamenetz (Podcast) | Education S.T.E.A.M. | Scoop.it
Award-winning education writer Anya Kamenetz provides practical guidance for parents looking to understand standardized testing.
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8 Myths That Undermine #Educational #Effectiveness

8 Myths That Undermine #Educational #Effectiveness | Education S.T.E.A.M. | Scoop.it
Edutopia blogger Mark Phillips examines eight myths that drive education policy, including the value of homework for students and merit pay for teachers, the irrelevance of funding and class size, and the fairness of college admissions.
Susan Davis Cushing's insight:

The latest thinking on teachers, homework, class size, test scores, and merit pay.

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Teaching in the Age of Minecraft

Teaching in the Age of Minecraft | Education S.T.E.A.M. | Scoop.it
A popular video game provides a new medium for educators and students to unleash their creativity.
Susan Davis Cushing's insight:

Technology and creativity working together in education. #ItHappens 

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— Sir Ken Robinson. How schools kill creativity.

— Sir Ken Robinson. How schools kill creativity. | Education S.T.E.A.M. | Scoop.it
Sir Ken Robinson. How schools kill creativity.

Via Jose Luis Anzizar
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Standardized Achievement Tests: What Are They Good For? Hint: Not Cognitive Ability.

Standardized Achievement Tests: What Are They Good For? Hint: Not Cognitive Ability. | Education S.T.E.A.M. | Scoop.it
A new study makes it clear what growth in standardized test performance doesn’t buy us: cognitive ability.
Susan Davis Cushing's insight:

"This is consistent with prior research suggesting that cognitive ability predicts academic achievement, but academic achievement does not predict cognitive ability. - See more at: http://www.creativitypost.com/education/standardized_achievement_tests_what_are_they_good_for_hint_not_cogniti#sthash.A8h2iQbw.dpuf

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Stop Exploring 'Innovative Education Models', We Need Action Now

Stop Exploring 'Innovative Education Models', We Need Action Now | Education S.T.E.A.M. | Scoop.it

I've recently been drawn to a slew of impassioned posts from several strong voices in education, each managing more than the last to confirm we're headed towards a defining moment in the history of our schools: a shift from an exploration of more effective models of teaching and learning, to an ethical imperative to implement them in our schools. (more)

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Antonia Rudenstine's curator insight, April 7, 2013 10:22 AM

Wish our school district even knew this conversation is going on...

IncitED's curator insight, July 13, 2013 10:33 AM

Thoughts about this? Without exploration, there is no innovation. But, I do get their point. 

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New TV ad by education advocates backs creation of teacher evaluation system ... - New York Daily News

New TV ad by education advocates backs creation of teacher evaluation system ... - New York Daily News | Education S.T.E.A.M. | Scoop.it
New York Daily News
New TV ad by education advocates backs creation of teacher evaluation system ...

Via Monica S Mcfeeters
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Visual Learning: High and Dry

Visual Learning: High and Dry | Education S.T.E.A.M. | Scoop.it
This Visual Learning activity will get your students thinking about what it would be like to live in a remote area and between two worlds—the past of their ancestors and the present of American mainstream culture.
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25 TED Talks Perfect For Classrooms - Edudemic

25 TED Talks Perfect For Classrooms - Edudemic | Education S.T.E.A.M. | Scoop.it

With the click of a button you can be inspired, educated, encouraged, wowed, or entertained by speakers from all walks of life.


Via Monica S Mcfeeters
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The Inner Cities Poetry Arts Project

The Inner Cities Poetry Arts Project | Education S.T.E.A.M. | Scoop.it
Turn your students into poets by inspiring them to free-write about their inner world, introducing them to the rhythms of poetry, and prompting them with images and possible titles.
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8 Living Artists Every Educator Should Know

8 Living Artists Every Educator Should Know | Education S.T.E.A.M. | Scoop.it
Teachers can inspire students by bringing the lives and works of contemporary artists into the classroom.
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Resources for STEAM

Resources for STEAM | Education S.T.E.A.M. | Scoop.it
Discover information, examples, and tools related to incorporating aspects of the arts, design, and the humanities into STEM-based school activities.
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How Seattle Got Its (Arts) Groove Back

How Seattle Got Its (Arts) Groove Back - Bright - Medium
Arts education is rarely a priority, especially in low-income schools. Here’s how Seattle is changing that.
Susan Davis Cushing's insight:

Great, full-length cartooned story about arts education in Medium. Must be registered to view.

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Let the Kids Learn Through Play

Let the Kids Learn Through Play | Education S.T.E.A.M. | Scoop.it
Academic teaching in kindergarten backfires.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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4 Ways Technology Can Help Empower Teachers And Students

4 Ways Technology Can Help Empower Teachers And Students | Education S.T.E.A.M. | Scoop.it
Ed tech should be a means, not an end, to improving our education system.


"All too often, technology is treated as a silver bullet for perceived problems in education. This sometimes leads to knee-jerk investments, using scarce resources to invest in software or hardware without a clear notion of how either might actually empower learning. Instead of having more technology as a goal, we should have more human interaction, personalization, access, and content mastery as the goals, and then think about what tools can get us there. (more)

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Lindsay Bierman says the arts create ‘STEAM’ in our community

Lindsay Bierman says the arts create ‘STEAM’ in our community | Education S.T.E.A.M. | Scoop.it
As chancellor of the UNC School of the Arts, the Journal invited me to describe the challenges that face my institution. After 25 years in the private sector, I joined the school last August at a turning point in its storied history: a 50th anniversary that calls on us to reflect on our past and re-imagine our future as the nation’s first public arts conservatory.

Via Shoshana Fanizza
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Sir Ken Robinson leads charge into student-disruption - Innovate My School

Sir Ken Robinson leads charge into student-disruption - Innovate My School | Education S.T.E.A.M. | Scoop.it
How do you go about getting students invested in the planning of the future? The Ellen MacArthur Foundation has teamed up with educators, scientists and authors to bring learners and teachers a free, four week festival of disruption.
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The No. 1 Enemy of Creativity: Fear of Failure

The No. 1 Enemy of Creativity: Fear of Failure | Education S.T.E.A.M. | Scoop.it
To innovate, stop worrying about "failure" and start thinking of "learning."

Via Beth Kanter
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Tess Sorensen's curator insight, May 13, 2013 4:25 PM

"I've since learned that anyone who has a sense of humor is creative."  This is an important thing to remember.  Perhaps the idea of creativity seems so above, so lofty and special, that there are times when it is hard to recognize the creativity within oneself.  Especially after years and years of creativity being not encouraged and even squashed through formal education that looks more to recitation of material than actual learning.


IncitED's curator insight, July 12, 2013 9:38 PM

Yes. This is powerful. I find many students are afraid of being wrong or of failing; too much energy is spent on this anxiety. . . . 

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The World Bank’s Robert Hawkins on Linking Technology Skills to Learning, a 21st Century Model | CREATIVE Magazine

The World Bank’s Robert Hawkins on Linking Technology Skills to Learning, a 21st Century Model | CREATIVE Magazine | Education S.T.E.A.M. | Scoop.it

Robert Hawkins, a strong advocate for integrating Information Communication Technology into education, shares his ideas with Creative Times about the development of a pedagogical model that combines ICT with learning to produce a 21st century work force. Hawkins is the Executive Producer of an online gaming program, EVOKE (www.urgentevoke.com), that is pushing and inventing boundaries for improved learning.

 

Set in 2020, EVOKE is an online crash course that challenges students to address future world crises, such as food and water shortages. Launched March 3, 2010, the ten week course enabled 20,000 players around the world to participate and develop innovative approaches to solving real global challenges using 21st century skills.

 

“The assumption that we’re making is that more time on task translates into more knowledge and skill acquisition,” said Hawkins who is also a Senior Education Specialist at the World Bank which developed EVOKE. “The evaluation shows that players spent quite a bit of time engaging with the content. We think this is partially due to the incentives inherent in playing a game and receiving rewards. If this mode of engagement develops the type of motivation in students to stick with a subject, then we think there is some positive learning and skill acquisition taking place as a result. Beyond the motivational factors that contributed to more time with the content, we also saw a great deal of peer learning and interaction through the mechanics of the social aspects of the game. In many instances, students learn and understand concepts better from their peers.

 

I think part of the success of EVOKE was that it was driven by a very compelling story. The narrative gave students the space to imagine alternative possibilities. I think that provoking students to think 10 to 20 years into the future cultivates the imagination and is critical to thinking about the possible, about students thinking of things outside of their day-to-day lives, being exposed to new perspectives. I think that the ability to imagine is the first step in doing and actually following through and creating something.”

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc, Monica S Mcfeeters
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Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, March 22, 2013 10:08 PM

Great scoop! Take some time to read through this! Thanks for curating this article Chuck!

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The Science of “Chunking,” Working Memory, and How Pattern Recognition Fuels Creativity

The Science of “Chunking,” Working Memory, and How Pattern Recognition Fuels Creativity | Education S.T.E.A.M. | Scoop.it

"The process of combining more primitive pieces of information to create something more meaningful is a crucial aspect both of learning and of consciousness and is one of the defining features of human experience. Once we have reached adulthood, we have decades of intensive learning behind us, where the discovery of thousands of useful combinations of features, as well as combinations of combinations and so on, has collectively generated an amazingly rich, hierarchical model of the world. Inside us is also written a multitude of mini strategies about how to direct our attention in order to maximize further learning. We can allow our attention to roam anywhere around us and glean interesting new clues about any facet of our local environment, to compare and potentially add to our extensive internal model."


Via Howard Rheingold
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luiy's comment, January 30, 2013 11:49 AM
What makes the difference, Bor argues, is a concept called chunking, which allows us to hack the limits of our working memory — a kind of cognitive compression mechanism wherein we parse information into chunks that are more memorable and easier to process than the seemingly random bits of which they’re composed.
wayne_b's curator insight, February 6, 2013 10:58 AM

It is the process of combining various pieces of information to create something new and more meaningful - that is our learning process. As we combine information from one person or site, and add the thoughts of someone else, that we generate new ideas or expressions of those combined thoughts.

Anne Macdonell's curator insight, May 14, 2013 8:27 AM

Tech fuels chunking info and curation.

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Do Schools Kill Creativity? A new conversation

Do Schools Kill Creativity? A new conversation | Education S.T.E.A.M. | Scoop.it

December 7. 2012


"TED and The Huffington Post are excited to bring you TEDWeekends, a curated weekend program that introduces a powerful "idea worth spreading" every Friday, anchored in an exceptional TEDTalk. This week's TEDTalk is accompanied by an original blog post from the featured speaker, along with new op-eds, thoughts and responses from the HuffPost community. Watch the talk above, read the blog post and tell us your thoughts below. Become part of the conversation"

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