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How a Radical New Teaching Method Could Unleash a Generation of Geniuses

How a Radical New Teaching Method Could Unleash a Generation of Geniuses | Teaching Styles(Common Core, Standardized Testing) | Scoop.it
Students in Matamoros, Mexico weren't getting much out of school -- until a radical new teaching method unlocked their potential.

 

Mitra’s work has roots in educational practices dating back to Socrates. Theorists from Johann Heinrich Pestalozzi to Jean Piaget and Maria Montessori have argued that students should learn by playing and following their curiosity.

 

Einstein spent a year at a Pestalozzi-inspired school in the mid-1890s, and he later credited it with giving him the freedom to begin his first thought experiments on the theory of relativity.

 

Google founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin similarly claim that their Montessori schooling imbued them with a spirit of independence and creativity.

 


Via Gust MEES
Karla Luetzow's insight:

 

The main focus of this article is discovering the most effective way to learn. In Mexico, a school José Urbina López Primary School 

 changed their curriculum and allowed children the freedom to explore and learn on their own. The new curriculum was modeled after Sugata Mitra’s “school in the cloud.” In today’s age of constant information, “school in the cloud” challenged if a computer can teach students as well as a teacher.

 

I found this article incredibly intriguing. The model of education has been the same since the 1800’s. A teacher instructs a classroom of pupils with routine tests to analyze  each student's progress. I have heard of online high schools and college classes, but the idea that seven year olds can learn on their own astonishes me. I never even thought of changing the standard teacher-student classroom in elementary school.  Replacing a teacher with a computer is an extraordinary idea for the future. It is very difficult to imagine. However, our society is changing with this new technology. Therefore, it makes sense to me that our education system should change along with it.

 

Most people would agree that it is easier to learn material that one finds interesting. The type of learning in this article plays into this strength. I wonder if this type of learning would work in an area with distractions such as television, video games, and cell phones. I would be interested to see if the outcome would show the same positive results. I do not think it would. 

 

 This article ties in with the TedTalk by Sugata Mitra. To further learn about this type of learning, I suggest watching the video

 

 http://www.npr.org/2013/06/21/179015266/how-much-can-children-teach-themselves

 

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Daniella Broomberg's curator insight, October 15, 2013 10:44 AM

I really enjoyed this article. Finally a postivive slant on education that provides teachers with a way of improving and changing the way they interact with students. I wholeheartedly agree with the notion that as the world changes and expects different qualities and skills from students, so too must the education system reform. 

Steph's Journalism Group 2013's curator insight, October 15, 2013 10:46 AM
Daniella Broomberg's insight:

I really enjoyed this article. Finally a postivive slant on education that provides teachers with a way of improving and changing the way they interact with students. I wholeheartedly agree with the notion that as the world changes and expects different qualities and skills from students, so too must the education system reform. 

AnnKatherine Brito's curator insight, April 3, 2014 11:59 AM

Students in control of their own education. This is amazing! Will this revolutionize education?

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Scooped by Karla Luetzow
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TN Student Speaks Out About Common Core, Teacher Evaluations, and Educational Data

Recorded at the Knox County School Board Regular Meeting November 6, 2013 Share this video with and spread the message: we will not accept these issues with ...
Karla Luetzow's insight:

 

The high school student Ethan Young from Knoxville, Tennessee went in front of the school board to attest the new Common Core curriculum. His speech quickly turned into a viral video. His passion for education and for teachers at such a young age inspired many.

 

The first time I saw this video I was very surprised to see that this young man was still a senior in high school. His speech was incredibly written and eloquently spoken. I found myself to be cheering with him as he finished his speech. One aspect of his speech I particularly enjoyed was his focus back on the teachers. Many times the pros and cons of standardized testing, which will be used in the Common Core focuses on the students. However, the new standardized testing puts just as much pressure on the teachers. Ethan Young reflected that Common Core is a “glowing conflict of interest … that illustrate a mistrust of teachers.” I found myself agreeing with this statement. Instead of a teacher judging if a student is on grade level, an arbitrary test given to every student determines it. The teacher is the one who works with the students every day. The teacher understands the student’s strengths, weaknesses, and even home life. Some may argue that teachers may not want to deal or accept if one of their students is falling behind. This could be true. However, if we trust our teachers to teach students, then we should trust our teachers to evaluate students as well.

            Personally, I saw the effects of the new Common Core testing in my EDCI280 classroom. The fourth grade teacher, the ESOL teacher, and the special education teacher discussed the new implications of Common Core. With the new standardized testing in place, the teachers discussed how no teacher would want to work with special education students. These students usually do not score as much progress as Talented and Gifted students. Therefore, the teacher will not look as successful if they teach students who are special education. By putting all this pressure on the teachers, Common Core will impact the teachers and their relationship with their students in a negative light. 

 Therefore, I agree with Ethan Young. Common Core highlights a mistrust for teachers. Instead of adding more standardized tests for students, teachers should be required to evaluate their students more. A more rigorous teacher preparation program can prepare teachers to evaluate their students in an effective manner. Overall, I really enjoyed watching this video. Ethan Young's passion at such a young age inspired me to learn more about Common Core. 

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Teachers Are Supposed to Assign Harder Books, but They Aren't Doing It Yet

Teachers Are Supposed to Assign Harder Books, but They Aren't Doing It Yet | Teaching Styles(Common Core, Standardized Testing) | Scoop.it
Because of Winn-Dixie, Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl, and To Kill a Mockingbird are among the most popular texts assigned to public-school students, a new report shows.
Karla Luetzow's insight:

 The main focus of the article is that the new common core standard will challenge students and teachers to study higher level books in the classroom.  The article includes three charts from elementary, middle , and high school stating the top ten books studied in the classroom. Next to these books, a ranking of reading difficulty was given. I recognized many of the titles including Bud, Not Buddy, Because of Winn Dixie, Things Fall Apart, and Diary of Anne Frank.  While this report stated that teachers teach books  below grade level, I studied The Diary of Anne Frank in my fifth grade classroom. The chart ranks Anne Frank to be an upper middle school book. I remember really loving the challenge of the book and discussing with my classmates.Also, I think students should be challenged to read harder books in the classroom. Students can read below level books on the side. With the help of the teacher and reading groups, the time and place to challenge students in reading can be text assignments in the classroom.

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Katie Figgie's comment, October 26, 2013 6:26 PM
I agree with you Karla, I always really enjoyed being challenged by books. I think that it is really important for teachers to encourage their students to go above their reading comfort zones because many children may discover that they actually can read at a higher level but just haven't tried to yet. Hopefully this aspect of the common core will help students and teachers rise above the reading limits they thought they had.
Katie Figgie's curator insight, October 26, 2013 6:35 PM
This article explains the new common core standards influences on literature. The new common core standards set in schools are planning to challenge students with higher level books than they have typically been given in their grade level. The article explains that the new standards “require students to read texts that are on grade level, even if the all students in a class aren't able to read the works without assistance.” Since teachers typically assign books slightly under the reading level of the grade students who have surpassed that reading level may become bored, a librarian can introduce them to new books that will continue to challenge their reading skills so that they do not become disinterested in reading. On the other side of the literacy spectrum, teachers now have to assign books that some students may not be able to read. A librarian can help those students find other books that are more at their skill level so that these children are not put off by reading. Librarians would be an absolutely wonderful resource for either teachers that are looking for harder books to challenge their students or students themselves looking for more skill appropriate books. It is so important to give students’ books that will challenge their reading skills because it will hopefully encourage them to continue to challenge themselves with harder and harder books constantly improving their literacy. It will also help them not become bored in a class that may be at a slower pace than they are. Reading books that are too mature and difficult for students also can absolutely turn them off of reading and since teachers must follow the common core guidelines they are a little stuck in how much they can individualize the reading list for their students. The article All Aboard!: Implementing Common Core offers school librarians an opportunity to take the lead goes into a little detail about how librarians have more freedom when it comes to common core standards which means they can completely focus on student’s levels without having to worry about following state standards. 
Rescooped by Karla Luetzow from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
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How a Radical New Teaching Method Could Unleash a Generation of Geniuses

How a Radical New Teaching Method Could Unleash a Generation of Geniuses | Teaching Styles(Common Core, Standardized Testing) | Scoop.it
Students in Matamoros, Mexico weren't getting much out of school -- until a radical new teaching method unlocked their potential.

 

Mitra’s work has roots in educational practices dating back to Socrates. Theorists from Johann Heinrich Pestalozzi to Jean Piaget and Maria Montessori have argued that students should learn by playing and following their curiosity.

 

Einstein spent a year at a Pestalozzi-inspired school in the mid-1890s, and he later credited it with giving him the freedom to begin his first thought experiments on the theory of relativity.

 

Google founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin similarly claim that their Montessori schooling imbued them with a spirit of independence and creativity.

 


Via Gust MEES
Karla Luetzow's insight:

 

The main focus of this article is discovering the most effective way to learn. In Mexico, a school José Urbina López Primary School 

 changed their curriculum and allowed children the freedom to explore and learn on their own. The new curriculum was modeled after Sugata Mitra’s “school in the cloud.” In today’s age of constant information, “school in the cloud” challenged if a computer can teach students as well as a teacher.

 

I found this article incredibly intriguing. The model of education has been the same since the 1800’s. A teacher instructs a classroom of pupils with routine tests to analyze  each student's progress. I have heard of online high schools and college classes, but the idea that seven year olds can learn on their own astonishes me. I never even thought of changing the standard teacher-student classroom in elementary school.  Replacing a teacher with a computer is an extraordinary idea for the future. It is very difficult to imagine. However, our society is changing with this new technology. Therefore, it makes sense to me that our education system should change along with it.

 

Most people would agree that it is easier to learn material that one finds interesting. The type of learning in this article plays into this strength. I wonder if this type of learning would work in an area with distractions such as television, video games, and cell phones. I would be interested to see if the outcome would show the same positive results. I do not think it would. 

 

 This article ties in with the TedTalk by Sugata Mitra. To further learn about this type of learning, I suggest watching the video

 

 http://www.npr.org/2013/06/21/179015266/how-much-can-children-teach-themselves

 

more...
Daniella Broomberg's curator insight, October 15, 2013 10:44 AM

I really enjoyed this article. Finally a postivive slant on education that provides teachers with a way of improving and changing the way they interact with students. I wholeheartedly agree with the notion that as the world changes and expects different qualities and skills from students, so too must the education system reform. 

Steph's Journalism Group 2013's curator insight, October 15, 2013 10:46 AM
Daniella Broomberg's insight:

I really enjoyed this article. Finally a postivive slant on education that provides teachers with a way of improving and changing the way they interact with students. I wholeheartedly agree with the notion that as the world changes and expects different qualities and skills from students, so too must the education system reform. 

AnnKatherine Brito's curator insight, April 3, 2014 11:59 AM

Students in control of their own education. This is amazing! Will this revolutionize education?

Scooped by Karla Luetzow
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Three-Minute Video Explaining the Common Core State Standards - YouTube

This three-minute video explains how the Common Core State Standards will help students achieve at high levels and help them learn what they need to know to ...
Karla Luetzow's insight:

This informative YouTube video was published by DC public schools. It explains the new Common Core standard. Instead of states determining their own standards, Common Core makes a standard that all students should learn at the same time. It explains it in a very positive light with cartoon animation. 

 

While watching this video, the reasons for Common Core made sense. With states having different standards, students will learn different things. Common Core will make it fair for all students. The staircase analogy in the video was a great tool to explain Common Core. Also, Common Core is only for mathematics and reading. Therefore, teachers will still be able to be creative in science and social studies. However, I found it very interesting that while the video is so postive about Common Core, the comments and youtube likes were not supportive. In fact, this video has 339 thumbs down. One top comments stated, "People are not machines-they are people. People are different. They don't have the same educational needs or abilities. We don't need "common", we need individual." After reading a few more comments, I realized the other side, the con side of Common Core. This is a heavily debated topic. I  can compare the comment about indivualized education to Sugata Mitra's new education philosophy where the individual student chooses what he or she learns. Common Core is the complete oppostie of that. I find it intersting that both policies are new to the education spectrum but greatly differ from each other. 

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Why I back Common Core

Why I back Common Core | Teaching Styles(Common Core, Standardized Testing) | Scoop.it
N.C. students are counting on us. Every child and parent from kindergarten to 12th grade is trusting that voters, school administrators and public officials are making the best decisions possible to prepare them for the future.
Karla Luetzow's insight:

Past Chairman of the State Board of Education in North Carolina, Phil Kirk writes a blog post about his opinion of the new Common Core curriculum. He urges the people of North Carolina to support Common Core like he does. He states that he supports Common Core because it will allow students to be “ready to handle the increasingly high-stakes challenges of higher education." As a self proclaimed republican, Kirk recognizes and believes that the guidelines in Common Core follows his own beliefs of a hands off government policy.

 

 I found this blog post to be very interesting. One of the main reasons that Kirk supports Common Core is the emphasis on college preparedness. In today’s elementary schools, I see flags for colleges hanging in the entryway. In Beltsville Academy, an elementary and middle school in Prince George’s County, teachers are encouraged to show off their college gear. Some may think that elementary school is too early to introduce children to the idea of higher education. It may put too much pressure on children. However, I believe the complete opposite. Every student is so excited to learn about college. College is seen as a fun place to learn what you are interested in. I can’t count how many times my EDCI280 students asked me about college! They love hearing about it and I love telling them about my experience at the Univeristy of Maryland.  I really support Common Core’s aspect of college readiness. Even if a student is not planning on attending college, the skills for college cannot be harmful.

 

 

 

 

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When Parents Yank Their Kids Out of Standardized Tests - The Atlantic

When Parents Yank Their Kids Out of Standardized Tests - The Atlantic | Teaching Styles(Common Core, Standardized Testing) | Scoop.it
When Parents Yank Their Kids Out of Standardized Tests The Atlantic This past year has shown an “unprecedented surge” of parents, teachers, and students revolting against standardized testing, according to Bob Schaeffer of FairTest, a Ford...
Karla Luetzow's insight:

This news article reports teachers unanimous voting to not give the standardized math and reading district test at Seattle’s Garfield High School. District officials did not agree with this decision. However, parents, students, and teachers at the school all stood behind the decision. The article goes on to describe other protests like this happening around the country including states like Oklahoma, New York, and Texas.

 

Insight:

 

I have read many accounts against standardized testing by teachers and students. However, I never heard of an actual protest before reading this article. I am so glad that schools are taking the initiative to stand up for their beliefs. I believe it is teaching the students a valuable lesson to stand up for what they believe in. I was also shocked by the high percentage of parents who oppose standardized testing. In New York, eighty percent of parents decided against testing which would be used to evaluate their child’s teacher. I found this to connect to Ethan Young’s speech about standardized testing. Summarizing his speech, Ethan Young believed Common Core put too much pressure on teacher evaluation based from testing results. It is nice to see that parents believe in the ability to evaluate teachers without heavily relying on students' testing results.  

This article also questions the amount of testing a studnet should have to take. Many interviewees believe testing is essential to the learning process. They just believe the kind of testing implemented now is not the right kind. However, this article does not describe the right kind of testing. I would be interested to see the ideas behind that interviewee's statement. Overall, I found this article to make me further question the "right kind" of testing and the amount of testing that should be given to students. 

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Figuring Out Accountability During the Common-Core Transition

Figuring Out Accountability During the Common-Core Transition | Teaching Styles(Common Core, Standardized Testing) | Scoop.it

By Catherine Gewertz

 

"The next couple of years will be rough going. That's no surprise to anyone who's been tracking the Common Core State Standards and waivers from key parts of the No Child Left Behind Act."


Via Mel Riddile
Karla Luetzow's insight:

This blog post summarizes the tough transitional period of Common Core. It suggests that state education departments do not punish schools for not making assessment standards during the transition. However, the blog argues that a quick transition to Common Core is essential.

 

Insight:

 

After reading this blog post, I could not agree more with its opinion of the Common Core transition. As we have seen in the school systems in Maryland, the shift to common core can be a big adjustment to not only the students but also the teachers.  I have seen first hand the struggle teachers and students are facing in preparation for the Common Core. In my America Counts mentoring program, one of the teachers has to miss school every two weeks to go to Common Core training. The students then are being taught by a substitute. It can be easily inferred that a substitute teacher is usually not as effective as the actual teacher. Therefore, students do not receive the same quality education due to the Common Core teacher training. Also, my EDCI280 teacher is still learning about Common Core standards. She has mentioned to me before that the state is not the most reliable communicator of the new standards. Therefore, she finds herself scrambling to try to fit in the Common Core standards in her lesson plans. Overall, many teachers believe Common Core may be effective in the future. However, transition is always difficult. It will take a few years for teachers to finalize lesson plans and learn how to teach the standards effectively. Overall, I agreed with this article. Teachers should not be punished during the Common Core transitional time. Instead, teachers should just focus on adjusting to Common Core and not have to worry about the repercussions of their students’ testing results

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Linda Whitright's comment, July 11, 2013 10:26 PM
Uk
Linda Whitright's comment, July 11, 2013 10:26 PM
Ukh