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Lost Foods of New York City: Brooklyn Blackout Cake | Capital New York

Lost Foods of New York City: Brooklyn Blackout Cake | Capital New York | Education-Other | Scoop.it
Pioneered by the Ebinger Baking Company in Flatbush, Brooklyn, the Blackout Cake is a lost classic that haunts the sweet dreams of older Brooklynites.
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alexis leigh mayes's curator insight, February 28, 2014 9:21 AM

grab a brooklyn blackout cake after the fashion show

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18+ Videos Suggested for Back to School Faculty Meetings and other educational audiences

18+ Videos Suggested for Back to School Faculty Meetings and other educational audiences | Education-Other | Scoop.it

By Jonathan Martin

 

"This post could be almost infinite: there is most certainly an extraordinary array of options for videos which expand educators’ understandings and inspire advances in 21st century learning. But curation is about choice and selection, and while I know I will leave out many, I thought I’d offer up a set of 15 of my favorites for your consideration for video screening at at back-to-school or beginning-of-the-year faculty meetings (and/or parent and board meetings).

 

"I’ve starred those that might also serve as useful and engaging videos to share with students at back to school or other assemblies.

 

"I am sure every reader will have their own opinions about the videos I’ve left off this list, and please: add them below using the comment box, or, post yourself your own set and share the link from this post to your own."

 

A wonderful list. You are sure to find something valuable here. -JL


Via Jim Lerman
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A Four-Phase Process For Implementing Essential Questions | TeachThought

A Four-Phase Process For Implementing Essential Questions | TeachThought | Education-Other | Scoop.it

By Grant Wiggins

 

"We had a delightful visit to The School of the Future in New York City the other day. Lots of engaged kids, a great blend of instruction and constructivist work, and an obvious intellectual culture. And as the picture illustrates, everywhere we went we also saw helpful visual reminders of the big ideas and essential questions framing the work we were watching:

 

"School of the Future staff have long been users of UbD tools and ideas.

But far too often over the years I have seen plenty of good stuff posted like this – but no deep embedding of the Essential Question (EQ) into the unit design and lessons that make it up.  Merely posting the EQs and occasionally reminding kids of it is pointless: the aim is to use the question to frame specific activities, to provide perspective and focus, to prioritize the course, and to signal to students that, eventually, THEY must – on their own – pose this and other key questions. (Note: I am not criticizing what we saw and heard at SoF, rather using this teachable moment to raise an issue that needs addressing by almost all faculty using our work.)

 

"Let’s start with a simple example from my own teaching. The EQ for the unit: Who sees and who is blind? The readings: The Emperor’s New Clothes, Plato’s Allegory of the Cave, Oedipus the King. Students are instructed to take notes around the EQ and other questions that arise related to it (e.g. Why do people deceive themselves?). We alternate between small-group discussions of the previous night’s reading, Socratic Seminar on the readings with the whole class, some mini-lessons on reading and note-taking skills, and a teacher-led de-briefing of what worked, what didn’t in Seminar as well as a discussion of confusing points in the texts. The final assessment? An essay on the EQ.

 

"At every turn, in other words, the EQ looms large in the unit. Students are not only encouraged to keep pondering it across each reading, but they take notes on the question and routinely remind one another that this question is the focus.

 

"This is far different than what we typically see in walk-throughs where EQs are being used. The only person that keeps referring to the EQ is the teacher; the main use of the question is by teachers in which they point out “answers” to the EQ. Rarely is the EQ central to the assessment – in part, because all too often the EQ is too convergent and has a right answer that the teacher wants learned. Almost never does there appear to be a plan whereby the question goes from the teacher’s control to the students’ control."


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