Education of Children with Incarcerated Parents
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Giving a Boost to Kids of Incarcerated Parents « Office of Public Affairs

Giving a Boost to Kids of Incarcerated Parents « Office of Public Affairs | Education of Children with Incarcerated Parents | Scoop.it
The following post appears courtesy of Karol Mason, Assistant Attorney General for the Office of Justice Programs. This week, the beloved children's television show “Sesame Street” introduced a character named Alex.
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Read To Me Presentation

Hennepin County Library's Read to Me program promotes early literacy and libraries by empowering incarcerated parents to stay connected to their children thr...
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Florida Department of Corrections Partner with Sesame Street Focusing On Children of Incarcerated Parents

Florida Department of Corrections Partner with Sesame Street Focusing On Children of Incarcerated Parents | Education of Children with Incarcerated Parents | Scoop.it
Little Children, Big Challenges: Incarceration provides resources and support to children, inmates, family and caregivers, which strengthens families and reduces recidivism.
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The Cycle of Risk

Bethany Casarjian discusses The Cycle of Risk For more information about Power Source and The Power Source Professional Training on DVD, please visit http://...
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CHILDREN OF INCARCERATED PARENTS FACT SHEET

http://211.idaho.gov/pdf/COIP_Factsheet.pdf

 

CHILDREN OF INCARCERATED PARENTS FACT SHEET
Incarceration of adults
• More than one in every 100 adults in America are in jail or prison1.
• On any given day, over 1.5 million children in this country--approximately 2% of the minor
children—have a parent serving a sentence in a state or federal prison2.
• There is a disparate impact on families of color, with African-American children nine times more
likely and Hispanic children three times more likely than white children to have a parent in prison3.
• Between 1995 and 2005, the number of incarcerated women in the U.S. increased by 57%
compared to 34 percent for men4 (Harrison & Beck, 2006). 75 percent of incarcerated women are
mothers5.
• Sixty-three percent of federal prisoners and 55 percent of state prisoners are parents of children
under age 186.
• Forty-six percent of all imprisoned parents lived with at least one of their minor children, prior to
entry7.
• The average age of children with an incarcerated parent is eight years old; 22 percent of the
children are under the age of five8.
How does this affect children and families left behind?
• Despite widespread statements that children with incarcerated parents are many times more
likely than other children to be incarcerated as adults, there is no reliable research evidence to
support this assertion9.
• Parental incarceration creates additional challenges for children and families often resulting in:
o Financial instability and material hardship, with financial problems the most severe for
already vulnerable families and caregivers who support contact between the incarcerated
parent and his or her child10;
o Instability in family relationships and structure, and residential mobility11;
o School behavior and performance problems 12 ; and
o Shame, social and institutional stigma13.
• In addition to lowering the likelihood of recidivism among incarcerated parents, there is evidence
that maintaining contact with one’s incarcerated parent improves a child’s emotional response to
the incarceration and supports parent-child attachment14;
• Many programs and services for children whose parents are incarcerated offer promise in
meeting some aspect of children’s needs, but have not been empirically validated as having
either short- or long-term impacts on children’s well-being15.
How does this affect children and youth with respect to foster care?
• Most law enforcement agencies lack training and protocols on where to place children when a
parent is arrested and incarcerated16.
• Ten percent of incarcerated mothers have a child in a foster home or other state care17.
• Eleven percent of children in foster care have a mother who is incarcerated for at least some
period of time while in foster care; however, 85 percent of these children were placed in foster
care prior to the mother’s first period of incarceration18.
• The average stay in first foster care for a child with an incarcerated mother is 3.9 years19.
• Children of incarcerated mothers are four times more likely to be “still in” foster care than all other
children. Children of incarcerated mothers are more likely to “age out” of the foster care system;
less likely to reunify with their parents, get adopted, enter into subsidized guardianship, go into
independent living or leave through some other means20.
o Reunification is 21% for children of incarcerated mothers versus 40% for all children
o Adoption is 37% for children of incarcerated mothers versus 27% for all children.
End notes
1 The Pew Charitable Trusts (2008). One in 100: Behind Bars in America 2008. Washington, DC. Available online at
http://www.pewcenteronthestates.org/uploadedFiles/One%20in%20100.pdf
2 Mumola, C. J. (2000). Incarcerated parents and their children. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Justice. Accessed 04/17/08 at
http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/bjs/pub/pdf/iptc.pdf.
3 Ibid.
4 Harrison, P. M. & Beck, A. J. (2006). Prisoners in 2005. U.S. Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Statistics. Washington, DC.
Available online at http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/bjs/pub/pdf/p05.pdf.
5 Mumola, C. J. (2000).
6Ibid.
7 Ibid.
8 Ibid
9 Ibid.
10 Garfinkel, I., Geller, A., & Cooper, C. (2007). Parental Incarceration in Fragile Families: Summary of Three Year Findings. A report
to the Annie E. Casey Foundation (unpublished); Hairston, C. Finney. (2007).
11 Ibid.
12 Hairston, C. F. (2007); Hanlon, T. E., Blatchley, R. J., Bennett-Sears, T., O’Grady, K. E., Rose, M., & Callaman, J. M. (2005).
Vulnerability of children of incarcerated addict mothers: Implications for preventive intervention. Children and Youth Services
Review, 27, 67– 84.
13 Hairston, C. F. (2007).
14 La Vigne, N.G., Naser, R.L. Brooks, L.E. & Castro, J.L. (2005). Examining the effect of incarceration and in-prison family contact
on prisoners’ family relationships. Journal of Contemporary Criminal Justice, 21(4).
15 Hairston, C. F. (2007).
16 Nieto, M. (2002). In danger of falling through the cracks: Children of arrested parents. California Research Bureau, CRB 02-009.
17 Mumola, C. J. (2000).
18 Ross, T., Khashu, A., & Wamsley, M. (2004). Hard data on hard times: An empirical analysis of maternal incarceration, foster care
and visitation. New York: Vera Institute of Justice Available online at: http://www.vera.org/publication_pdf/245_461.pdf.; Moses,
M.C. (2006). Does Parental Incarceration Increase a Child’s Risk for Foster Care Placement? NIJ Journal No. 255, available at:
http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/nij/journals/255/parental_incarceration.html
19 Ross, T., Khashu, A., & Wamsley, M. (2004).
20 Ross, T., Khashu, A., & Wamsley, M. (2004) & Moses, M.C. (2006).


Via Velvet Martin
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Velvet Martin's comment, August 26, 2012 7:55 PM
http://rangel.house.gov/news/articles/2011/09/foster-children-with-incarcerated-parents-a-murky-subject-for-states-report-finds-1.shtml
Dorothy Retha Cook's curator insight, January 28, 7:16 AM

Being back door screwed by the government while the government get paid major front door dollars for your free labor. Some to the point that the government is back door screwed and labeled as children of criminals government style.