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How To Add Rigor To Anything

How To Add Rigor To Anything | Education Leadership | Scoop.it

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"Rigor is a fundamental piece of any learning experience.

It is also among the most troublesome due to its relativity. Rigorous for whom? And more importantly, how can you “cause” it?

Barbara Blackburn, author of “Rigor is not a 4-Letter Word,” shared 5 “myths” concerning rigor, and they are indicative of the common misconceptions: that difficult, dry, academic, sink-or-swim learning is inherently rigorous.

Myth #1: Lots of Homework is a Sign of Rigor
Myth #2: Rigor Means Doing More
Myth #3: Rigor is Not For Everyone
Myth #4: Providing Support Means Lessening Rigor
Myth #5: Resources Do Not Equal Rigor"


Via Beth Dichter
David Baker's insight:

10 steps and Myths for Rigor will be a really good conversation at PIE.

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, September 27, 2013 4:29 PM

How can we add rigor to lesson plans? For 10 strategies check out this post. Five of the strategies are listed below (with more information about them in the post):
* Necessitate a transfer of knowledge

* Require students to synthesizing multiple sources

* Design tasks with multiple steps that build cognitively

* Use divergent perspectives

* Use divergent media forms

The post also provides a great Rigor Rubric that looks at the four levels (as in Level 1, 2, 3 and 4 as found in the new assessment for Race to the Top) as well as two areas, Curriculum and Instruction. Curriculum is divided into Content, Connections, Perspective and Texts/Materials. Instruction is divided into Delivery by Teacher, Depth and Reflection.

Consider sharing this rubric in your school and engaging teachers in a discussion of how we can best provide rigor to our students.

Kathy Lynch's curator insight, September 28, 2013 12:38 AM

Thanks Beth!

Hanya Lamp's curator insight, September 29, 2013 1:31 PM

Rigor is not "more of it;" it's scaffolding towards greater complexity.

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8 Ways to Gift Your Students With a Lifelong Learning Mindset

8 Ways to Gift Your Students With a Lifelong Learning Mindset | Education Leadership | Scoop.it
The lifelong learning mindset is one of the greatest gifts we can give to our students as educators. Here are some great ways to begin its cultivation.
David Baker's insight:
The 8 steps are reminders that we are creating learning patterns and habits for the students we teach, just as we create patterns in our children.  

"Consider the effects of equating mistakes with opportunities for strengthening understanding and awareness. Think of how we reward progress as with a baby taking those first few steps before falling down. We don’t admonish the child for not taking one step more than we expected them to, do we? ...Instead, we celebrate the achievement that was made with joy and love. We clap for their progress we were fortunate enough to bear witness to. The child becomes happy, encouraged, and determined to do even better. That’s why we must ensure learning is presented as a rewarding journey to students early on. If this happens, they are much more likely to continue wanting to learn as they grow older."  

I plan to share this with teachers as they think about mindset in the classroom.
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3 Areas Where Having “The Innovator’s Mindset” is Crucial

3 Areas Where Having “The Innovator’s Mindset” is Crucial | Education Leadership | Scoop.it
As I have contended for years, “Innovation” is about mindset, not skill set.  How we look at the world, is how we move forward, learn, and create.  In my book, “The Innovator&#821…
David Baker's insight:
Couros helps explore being ethical, being entrepreneurial and being empowered and how to connect these ideas to school.
The critical questions for moving forward on each topic are challenging. Here is part of his insight into empowerment.  "An empowered learner does not only learn math; they do things with the math they have learned. To get to that level, they have to have an ability in math, but they also need to go beyond, see relevancy to their own lives, and then apply and create their knowledge. Focusing on this notion of the empowered learner, does not simply have students become “good at school”, but to be able to learn and create far beyond it." 
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Leadership: The Bully Within - Lolly Daskal | Leadership

Leadership: The Bully Within - Lolly Daskal | Leadership | Education Leadership | Scoop.it
No one is born a bully. Bullying develops as a behavior like any other behavior. For a very few people, bullying is at the core of their “leadership” style, although actual leadership and bullying are miles apart. For most of us, bullying is only a response in certain situations, with certain people, or at certain times. All the things we’re scared of flare up and we respond by bullying someone. Leadership suffers when bullying occurs, so even if the bully within us makes only rare appearances, we need to be aware of our own insecurities and confront them in a way that shuts down any tendency we may have to bully others.
David Baker's insight:
this provides a context for how leadership is used or misused within an organization.
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4 Non-Negotiables for Schools

4 Non-Negotiables for Schools | Education Leadership | Scoop.it
As my daughter just passed her fourth month in this world, it is amazing to see how curious she is about the world.  Her wide eyes seemingly notice everything around her, and watching her try new t…
David Baker's insight:
The quote "A professional is anyone who does work that cannot be standardized easily and who continuously welcomes challenges at the cutting edge of his or her expertise.1 Educators need to put their own learning at the forefront to ensure that schools go beyond being relevant to students, but immerse students in the reality of their current world, while preparing them for the future." for me is important because it gives perspective on our role and mindset as a professional. 
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Skills for Success in a Disruptive World of Work

Skills for Success in a Disruptive World of Work | Education Leadership | Scoop.it
“Skills young people should be learning to be prepared for a career in 2020 include:


The ability to concentrate, to focus deeply.

 

The ability to distinguish between the “noise” and the message in the ever-growing sea of information.

 

The ability to do public problem solving through cooperative work.

 

The ability to search effectively for information and to be able to discern the quality and veracity of the information one finds and then communicate these findings well.

 

Synthesizing skills (being able to bring together details from many sources).

 

The capability to be futures-minded through formal education in the practices of horizon-scanning, trends analysis and strategic foresight.”

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2015/05/26/what-are-the-skills-needed-from-students-in-the-future/

 


Via Gust MEES
David Baker's insight:
Infographic and discussion of the range of skills we need to help students learn as well as colleagues is helpful.  I was struggling with deep focus before I read this. It was a gentle reminder to step it up in many ways.
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Victor Ventura's curator insight, December 14, 2016 8:05 AM
All of these made sense to me and a couple recently sharply resonated with me.
Gilson Schwartz's curator insight, December 18, 2016 8:30 AM
Antigamente a gente falava em "profissões do futuro". Agora são os "skills" do futuro"
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Discomfort, Growth, and Innovation

Discomfort, Growth, and Innovation | Education Leadership | Scoop.it
Foster a culture of successful innovation by empathizing with fellow educators who are uncomfortable with risk, modeling a growth mindset, and celebrating effort as well as success.
David Baker's insight:
This blog helped me think about the dynamics of fostering change within a diverse system.
According to Simon Sinek’s discussion of the Law of Diffusion of Innovation, only about 16 percent of any group actively pursue change. Why? In my experience, these individuals thrive on it. They naturally follow a continuous cycle: Risk: They enjoy experimentation. They look for opportunities to try new technology with their students, redesign assessments, suggest curriculum shifts, or pilot new programs. Learn: Each risk may result in success or failure. They embrace both. They gather data, self-assess, reflect, and collaborate so that they can learn as much as possible. Grow: They have the growth mindset described by Carol Dweck. They believe that they can and should continuously improve themselves and their practice. Innovate: They embrace what George Couros calls the innovator’s mindset. They seek new and different ways to solve any challenges they might encounter, which usually means identifying a new risk to start the process all over again. illustration of a circle with the words risk, learning, growth, and innovation around it 
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Ring Their Bells: A New Way to Deliver Bell Work

Ring Their Bells: A New Way to Deliver Bell Work | Education Leadership | Scoop.it
Because students bring a broad variety of needs and emotions, start class with bell work that engages their working memory and sets the tone for positive, productive learning.
David Baker's insight:
Bell work, starters or other quick engagement strategies are especially important.
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Promoting Change in Your Coaching Practice ‹ http://coachfederation.org/blog

Promoting Change in Your Coaching Practice ‹ http://coachfederation.org/blog | Education Leadership | Scoop.it
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Great coaching conversation today thinking through the idea of testing implications especially with short-term targeted coaching.
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Find the Fireflies – Help Students to Shine

Find the Fireflies – Help Students to Shine | Education Leadership | Scoop.it
Through my work in promoting a strengths-based education and culture in schools, the question often gets raised: where do we to start? People often agree that to bring out the best in people, shift…
David Baker's insight:
This idea of reaching into the heart and passions of our teachers and students is vital to enable them to shine. 
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Research Shows Students Learn Better When They Figure Things Out On Their Own

Research Shows Students Learn Better When They Figure Things Out On Their Own | Education Leadership | Scoop.it
In some instances, research illuminates a topic and changes our existing beliefs. For example, here’s a post that challenges the myth of preferred learning styles. Other times, you might hear about a study and say, “Well, of course that’s true!” This might be one of those moments.
Last year, Dr. Karlsson Wirebring and fellow researchers published a study that supports what many educators and parents have already suspected: students learn better when they figure things out on their own, as compared to being told what to do.  

Via John Evans
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David W. Deeds's curator insight, July 12, 2016 6:51 PM

I had already figured this out on my own. ;) Thanks to John Evans.

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The 7 questions every new teacher should be able to answer

The 7 questions every new teacher should be able to answer | Education Leadership | Scoop.it
Technology News & Innovation in K-12 Education
David Baker's insight:
I am thinking this would be a great topic for a seminar or seminars as well as coaching conversations.
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Teacher Feedback for Teacher Trainers

Teacher Feedback for Teacher Trainers | Education Leadership | Scoop.it

As a developing teacher, there are lots of courses you can do and resources that you can access to aid your development, but when you become a teacher of teachers, this often isn't the case. Feedback especially, is an area in which the door is often literally and metaphorically closed and you get little feedback yourself on this area of practice.


Via Nik Peachey
David Baker's insight:
This blog supports an ongoing conversation about the different needs and skills for supporting teachers leaders that are working with preservice teachers. One area we are looking at as a district is how do we create systematic support or training for cooperating teachers. 
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Nik Peachey's curator insight, June 15, 2016 1:27 AM

Useful new site for teacher trainers or those who want to be.

reuvenwerber's curator insight, June 16, 2016 3:54 AM
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Who better to evaluate teachers than their students?

Who better to evaluate teachers than their students? | Education Leadership | Scoop.it
Who better to evaluate teachers than their students?
David Baker's insight:
This presents a strong case for engaging students in thinking about their teachers.  The author's humility and self-reflection add a strong model for how teachers might think about student feedback.
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9 Ways to Make Learning Irresistible

9 Ways to Make Learning Irresistible | Education Leadership | Scoop.it
True story. The bell rang and nobody moved. They were completely focused, totally engrossed. They probably didn't even hear the bel
David Baker's insight:
Moments of flow in the classroom. Those times where student interest and attention are so focused. Here are good reminders to aspire toward in lessons. "We should create conditions where students are disappointed there isn't more time to work on whatever they are learning. As for my promise of social time, my students should've been interacting throughout the whole class. I don't have to reserve time for you to visit. You will be talking with your classmates as part of the process. You will be sharing the amazing things you are learning."
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5 Blind Spots Educators Must Address

5 Blind Spots Educators Must Address | Education Leadership | Scoop.it
More than likely, you've seen the video below. It is designed to test the power of your attention. It will take careful concentratio
David Baker's insight:
Asking teachers to think about their lessons and whether they are designed to help the teacher teach better or to help students learn more will be a powerful question during coaching this semester.  

The challenge for #3 is more than teaching for the world our students live in now but preparing them for the world that will evolve over the next years. We cannot remain teaching as we learned it just as teaching for now is still too limiting.
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Guest Post: Increase the Impact of your Feedback as Instructional Coach

Guest Post: Increase the Impact of your Feedback as Instructional Coach | Education Leadership | Scoop.it
A teacher was talking to me this week about her instructional coach. She said, “You can’t just give feedback to me. Giving feedback in the wrong way has no impact.” Wow. You have so many delicate relationships to navigate as an instructional coach. Your principal, associate principal, curriculum and district coordinator, and teachers all require…
David Baker's insight:
Roles as an instructional coach are sometimes not clear to coaches or teachers. The frame of the different purposes for feedback allows a coach to know their intent and choose congruent behaviors.
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Is Your Lesson a Grecian Urn?

Is Your Lesson a Grecian Urn? | Education Leadership | Scoop.it
Far too many students are doing projects that look creative but offer almost no opportunity for real learning. Time for the Grecian Urns to go.
David Baker's insight:
Helpful ways to work with teachers as they discern purpose of instructional projects. the focus is on learning and connecting, not just a craft.
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Peeling Away Cultural Cataracts to Reveal Humanity’s Beauty

Peeling Away Cultural Cataracts to Reveal Humanity’s Beauty | Education Leadership | Scoop.it
Alhassan Susso shares how being an immigrant in America helped him become a more compassionate, understanding, and tolerant teacher.
David Baker's insight:
This post gives a personal story to the importance of compassion and the power that we have to impact others.

Moving from a small village in The Gambia to the United States, a large nation with so many diverse cultures, taught me that we often develop what I like to call cultural cataracts. It’s when the social lenses through which we see become increasingly opaque and blurry.
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10 ways for leaders to build trust in schools

10 ways for leaders to build trust in schools | Education Leadership | Scoop.it
Trust and trust-building qualities frequently top polls and surveys that attempt to show the most important qualities of a leader. A 2016 McQuaig Global Talent Recruitment Survey places trust as th…
David Baker's insight:
This builds on works such as Trust Matters.  Having concrete school-based steps is helpful.  "A 2016 McQuaig Global Talent Recruitment Survey places trust as the second most important quality of an effective leader while a PewResearch Center survey shows honesty to be most important. More recently in the run up to the 2016 US election a Fortune poll showed that of the 2000 American voters surveyed, honesty and integrity were seen as most important qualities for leaders to possess. In the area of school leadership, Gary Hopkins, editor of Education World, writes that from a survey of 43 Principals, trustworthiness and credibility were viewed as highly important qualities for school leaders."
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100 Questions that promote Mathematical Discourse

David Baker's insight:
The categories: Help students work together to make sense af mathematics, help students rely more on themselves to determine whether something is mathematically correct, help students learn to reason mathematically are three of the key areas that helping teachers to plan explicitly around is important.  
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New campaign promotes power of teachers to reduce stress of traumatized students

New campaign promotes power of teachers to reduce stress of traumatized students | Education Leadership | Scoop.it
A non-profit journalism website reporting on key education issues in California and beyond.
David Baker's insight:
Examples and videos are powerful to illustrate the importance of teachers in student learning.

"The need for adults to take steps, small or large, to encourage these children is urgent, the campaign said. More than 60 percent of children from birth to age 17 in the United States were exposed to violence, crime and abuse in the past year, according to a paper published in 2015 in JAMA Pediatrics that analyzed the results of the 2013-14 National Survey of Children’s Exposure to Violence."
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The Science Behind Smarter Decision Making: 7 Mental Models You Should Know

The Science Behind Smarter Decision Making: 7 Mental Models You Should Know | Education Leadership | Scoop.it
There are highly impactful people who've developed mental models to create processes for smarter decision making. Here's the top 7 we've curated for you.

Via F. Thunus
David Baker's insight:
This blog begins with the 4 quadrants. I especially like the Action steps. Having the additional models like 10-10-10 makes this a rich resource.
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Five Classroom Dimensions That Show Deep Math Learning Is Happening

Five Classroom Dimensions That Show Deep Math Learning Is Happening | Education Leadership | Scoop.it
Narrowing down essential elements of teaching math to five dimensions can help teachers provide students the agency they need to be competent learners.
David Baker's insight:
I will probably se this with math teachers as a part of our ongoing video work. This will combine well with pivotal teaching moments.
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The Struggle to Bring Cognitive Psychology to Schools

The Struggle to Bring Cognitive Psychology to Schools | Education Leadership | Scoop.it

Bruner found that even very young children constructed their own knowledge—that is, they made sense of new information based on prior experience and understanding. The job of the teacher was to help students build upon what they already knew.


Via Nik Peachey
David Baker's insight:
"The job of the teacher was to help students build upon what they already knew. So it didn’t make sense to fill children with facts, which they would forget as soon as the test was over. The goal was to help them recognize relationships between facts. You didn’t have to be a physicist or a historian to understand gravity or the Civil War. But you did need a teacher who could help you think like a physicist or a historian, ordering and analyzing information just like they did."

Interesting insights. Again demonstrating the importance of teaching students to think and make sense of content.

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Nik Peachey's curator insight, June 10, 2016 4:08 AM

Well worth reading.

Haiden Jacob-Byrd's curator insight, September 21, 2016 2:27 PM

Bruner believes that teachers have to specialize in critical thinking.

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, September 21, 2016 5:45 PM
The challenge is that the work of Dewey, Bruner, and Pestalozzi is hard work in classrooms. It will require rethinking what we call school and leadership rather than management.
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Five Minute Film School: Movie Making For the Rest of Us!

Everyone is a filmmaker. Learn how to be one here!

Via John Evans
David Baker's insight:
What a great tool for explaining the process. Fun way to introduce project to students or teachers. I'm wondering how this might be part of new teacher induction, PIE or student teacher seminars. This might be a fun option for PIE infographic night. 
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David Baker's curator insight, May 24, 2016 6:16 PM
What a great tool for explaining the process. Fun way to introduce project to students or teachers. I'm wondering how this might be part of new teacher induction, PIE or student teacher seminars.