Education in the world
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Education in the world
Education in different places of the world
Curated by Crissy Borton
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Giant outdoor escalator built in Colombian shantytown

Not everyday you see an escalator outside in a poor community. I wish the video would have talked more about why and what they hope it helps the city with. I am sure the people are glad not to have to walk up and down the steep hill but I have to wonder who is going to maintain it and where will the money come from?


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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 20, 2014 11:20 AM

This escalator seems like a waste of money. I understand that it will make life easier for the locals and possible cut down crime. But I feel with $7 million the government is choosing to attack the symptoms of living in the shantytown rather than treating the cause of inequalities. Perhaps they could have opened up local markets, started some sort of commercially viable industry, or help educate citizens that could provide the community members with a way to get out of poverty rather than.just making it easier to live in these shantytowns.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 14, 2014 7:09 PM

This is an interesting idea simply because of the discussion that can arise from it. Would the construction of this escalator actually benefit the people living within the slum to any foreseeable degree? On one hand some claim that yes it will have a positive impact as it could cut back on the number at attacks and muggings of those stopping to catch their breath as well as simply allowing them to conserve energy. While those on the other side of the issue say that the benefit the escalator my bring doesn't out weigh the cost of building it. Simply throwing money at a situation like this wont actually bring any relief. 

Kendra King's curator insight, February 8, 2015 4:40 PM

I sincerely believe that was a waste of money. Sure people can now get out of the area in “6 minutes” instead of “30 minutes” which, as was mentioned in class, can get people out of the area so as to get to jobs quicker. However what good does that really do in the grand scheme of things? Do the citizens still have poor jobs? Are their homes unsafe? Are there still sanitation issues? I am pretty sure the answer is yes, to all of the above. Clearly, these issues are more pressing than an escalator. So even if investing in an area can benefit a population, I think the improvement could have been greater because there are other more pressing needs of the area where the money could have been invested. 

 

I am actually surprised people were happy with the new addition. Given that it was a short clip, not all sides were seen. However, I feel that once people get over the novelty of the new toy and back to the reality of their everyday situation tensions could raise. Especially if the outdoor elevator breaks down, which is bound to happen given its exposure to mother nature, as the escalator just adds more of  a maintenance cost in a place that doesn't seem to have money. It wouldn't surprise me if people were later angered by the addition. In fact, I am actually surprised their wasn't protests that stopped the escalator from being built in the first place.  

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The relative merits of Corn Ethanol

The relative merits of Corn Ethanol | Education in the world | Scoop.it

I know this is the not point of the video but watching it all I could think of was how much Monsanto gets when land is converted to farm land and how everytime we add more corn fields the more roundup gets pumped into our land. The video though also shows once again how we look for short-term answers and not long term effects. Long term studies should still be done even if we need quick answers. Also that fact that people like the one gentlemen in the video who only want to look at how it affects their area and not globally is another issue.


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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 20, 2014 1:25 PM

Its a fact that we need to move towards alternative energy sources. To do so many countries have to evaluate what resources they have that can help provide energy for their population. In Brazil, they have used their physical geography to their advantage and have made a very sustainable biofuel. But this kind of fuel is not as cheap for other countries than it is for Brazil. I think it is important to note how Brazil is using its resource advantages to find a way to produce fuel. In the US we need to find a way to use our geography to overcome reliance on foreign oil. 

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U.S. Travel To Cuba Grows As Restrictions Are Eased

I think it is ridiculous that the US restricted travel to Cuba. We are supposed to be a free country and citizens should be able to decide for themselves if they wish to visit Cuba. I think it is good the Obama administration is lifting regulations. It is even more ridiculous that the one place they restrict travel to is Cuba. You can go to North Korea which is far more dangerous to the US. Yes, Castro and his regime will try to make themselves look good to travelers but as one women who was interviewed said it is up to those who visit to dig deeper if they wish to learn the truth about Cubin politics.


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Edgar Manasseh Jr.'s curator insight, February 14, 2015 7:40 PM

The growth between the U.S and Cuba has increased business wise from their past. Allowing tourists travel to Cuba is a slow process of Growth leading to more of an expansion in whatever business whether it be oil or goods to trade its a slow process of trust that's appearing between the two.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 6, 2015 8:21 PM

I think it is a good idea to have lifted restrictions on Cuba. We are talking about a restriction put on a country because of a Conflict called the Cold War, but the Cold War is long done now. It is also ridiculous that as a free country we are not allowed to travel there really without government approved sightseeing. Although the government approved sightseeing is informative for both culture and education, with less restrictions, people should be able to do stuff outside pre approved government tours. Being able to wander the country freely might even possibly boost economy from money being spent. 

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 11:50 AM

with the relaxing of restrictions towards Cuba an increase in tourism can obviously be expected to rise massively, especially as Cuban repatriates gain the ability to go and visit family and ancestral homes. this new policy will prove to be good for Cuba.

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Border Economies: the Maquiladora Export Landscape

Border Economies: the Maquiladora Export Landscape | Education in the world | Scoop.it

Although it is good that jobs are coming into Mexico and helping to build areas of the country it is sad that companies are taking advantage of the people by offering lower wages them they would here in the US. The question becomes is any job better then no job?


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Derek Ethier's comment, September 20, 2012 10:15 PM
Developed countries outsourcing jobs has become largely beneficial for developing countries. In the case of Mexico, the residents are given new opportunities in manufacturing jobs that they may have never had before. The industrialization of the border area can only lead to increasing development and hopefully a better standard of living for citizens. Unfortunately, it has the exact opposite effect on the U.S., which is giving away jobs.
Joshua Choiniere's comment, September 26, 2012 11:14 AM
This article is displaying the postive and negative side effects that these Maquiladoras have upon the development of stronger economic economies for such countries as Mexico. These buisnesss that invest in the border of Mexico allow these towns/cities to grow and become industrilized. This provides low skill work for the people of Mexico but the logistics of the companies are still being done in the country that has invested in these places. This is good because it lets countries like the United States keep educated/high paying jobs in the States. The negative aspect is that the only jobs the Mexicans recieve are the low paying uneducated type. However still it has postives for both countries and its something we must get used to because its the way of the future.
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For Mexico City, a Repurposed Landfill

For Mexico City, a Repurposed Landfill | Education in the world | Scoop.it

Wow! What a great idea to use the gas from the landfill to power homes. Although it may only work for a few years it would still be doing something useful with the gas from the landfill. I wonder if they will design their next landfill to be use more energy.


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Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 14, 2014 4:20 PM

Usually when a landfill becomes overloaded, it just gets shut down and left to rot. Mexico City is trying to do something new and ingenious with its massive landfill. Instead of closing off the land and letting it stay as reusable space, Mexico is hoping to develop a way to harness landfill gases in order to make electricity. If it is successful, it could prove to be a world-changing solution for other large, developing cities. It has the potential of lowering energy costs, creating jobs, and finding a purpose for land that would otherwise remain unusable for probably centuries. 

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 16, 2014 7:58 AM

In class we discussed the numerous environmental issues that exist in Mexico City. This is a great way of turning a negative into a positive. On a larger scale, I think this is going to be the kind of solutions that every country will have to eventually find. Creative ways of using technology to turn harmful waste into energy is a great idea. Methane is a cleaner than coal and recycling lessens the burden on natural resources.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 11:31 AM

this is a genius use of a necessary evil [landfills]. in the modern world energy is necessary, and the use of methane from a landfill means that the fuel is cheap, and that cost will transfer to the cost of power for the people buying it.

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For Mexicans Looking North, a New Calculus Favors Home

For Mexicans Looking North, a New Calculus Favors Home | Education in the world | Scoop.it

This article was surprising to me because the media and politicians make it seem as though more Mexicans are crossing into the United States. I think it is wonderful for Mexico that so many of its citizens are staying there now and working to make the country a better place for all to live. I cannot imagine what it is/was like for those who had to cross into the United States and leave their families so they could work and feed themselves and their families.


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Tracy Galvin's curator insight, February 4, 2014 5:58 PM

I often hear people say that Mexicans are crossing the border because they want to take all the things we have in the states, like it is some kind of 'greed' on their part. I have always said that people do not leave a place unless they are forced to, whether it is forced by other people or because their life is at stake. If there are not enough resources in an area, people will move to the nearest place with adequate resources. Instead of starving and living in the dirt, these people chose to risk their lives for the possibility of having their basic needs met. It is nice to see that Mexico is finally becoming a self-sustaining country that can offer its citizens enough to keep them from risking their lives for survival.

Amy Marques's curator insight, February 12, 2014 1:14 PM

This article discusses how there is a significant decline of undocumented migration from Mexico into the United States.  Illegal immigration is becoming less attractive to Mexicans and they are deciding to stay in their country instead of coming to U.S. because Mexico is making some changes. It is expanding economic and educational opportunities in the cities. There is rising border crime, a major deterrent from emigrating, it is dangerous and expensive because of cartel controlled borders. Another change is the shrinking families. The manufacturing sector at the border is rising, democracy is better established, incomes have risen and poverty has declined. Also a tequila boom has taken place and has created new jobs for farmers cutting agave and for engineers at the stills.

 

James Hobson's curator insight, September 23, 2014 12:11 PM

(Mexico topic 4)

Unlike other articles and videos, this one seems to possess a different "tone" towards the recent drop in immigration. It seems to imply that the drop in immigration will be mutually beneficial to both the US and Mexico. Mexico would benefit from having more workers to help grow its emerging economy, and the US would have fewer Welfare dependents. I'm not saying that I necessarily agree or disagree with this viewpoint, but I do find it to be a very unique take on the situation. I wonder if the reduction in immigration into the US has allowed more funds to be diverted away from collection and deportation to an increased emphasis on security and patrol efforts? In other words, I think that it is a possibility that the United States was, figuratively speaking, too busy "scooping water from the boat" to get around to "plugging the leak".

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2008 Election Maps

2008 Election Maps | Education in the world | Scoop.it

Just by looking at this map you would think Mccaine was g. oing to win. While the map does show us information in is also misleading as it is not taking into account the population of each area

 


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Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, November 12, 2013 1:05 PM

I really enjoyed this article, it was insctieful interesting and had very informitive visual aids. It was very interesting to see all the differnt maps prtayted thoughout the artile. I found that the infomation that they were describing was alot of things I had heard before, but the added affect of the visual aids were able to give me a deeper understading. It also really brings up some key geogragaphical regaions and shows how even thouhg a state might be blue there are still areas(towns, countis) with in the sate that are primarly red party. When this election was going on it sure seemed like it was goiing to be neck and neck, but clearly on election day bule took over .

Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 29, 2013 1:01 PM

It is amazing how a map can throw people off. It looks like McCain was winning but at the end Obama has won because more people have voted for him than his competitor. Also in the shaded blue area are much more populated then the areas in red because the red area are surrounded by woods and also the red area is like the suburbs of the city. It is very different how maps are portrayed and how misleading they can be. Never depend on one source find as many as you can to make your interpretations   

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 29, 2014 10:42 AM

Electoral college maps can sometimes trick you because it looks like McCain won but although most of mid west is republican there isnt a large population so they dont get as many votes as states with bigger populations like California, New York, Texas, Florida, etc. 

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TED Talk: Readings of the Qu'ran

I enjoyed this video very much. It was not long and did not throw too much information at me but was very informative. It was interesting to hear what was in the Koran and what has been misquoted such as the 72 virgins.


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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2014 12:04 PM

Interesting video. We also see how interpretations can be warped with the Quran but that is not exclusive to this one text. The Bible for instance falls victim to the same circumstances.

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Gentrification spelled out

Gentrification spelled out | Education in the world | Scoop.it

I find it a little sad that they renamed the restaurant. I wonder if they were pressured to do it. I do not think the name matters as long as the food is good ☺ I wonder if the people purchasing the more expensive condos where not patronizing it do to the name. I wonder if the name change will help bring in business.


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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, September 25, 2014 5:35 PM

Gentrification deals with the forcing out of lower income residents and making space available for the more affluent. The re-naming of Fish in the 'Hood shows how gentrification forces the culture  of entire communities to change. Although this restaurant was popular before, they were forced to re-brand so they can stay in business. Gentrification exiles the poor, with that their culture. This restaurant shows that, as more upscale business open up to service the needs of more affluent citizens, any business that has the perception of being the contrary will soon be out of business. This matters because it shows how gentrification destroys communities image, and culture for the sake of increasing revenue and real estate value. What is exhibit here is not only a socio-economic shift but also a racial shift as well. This neighborhood was predominately African American before it began to gentrify, "The 'Hood" is a saying that correlates with African American culture. This restaurant's re-branding shows that they no longer can continue to bring in customers with a name that is part of the African American vernacular. Furthermore, it shows the racial trends that go with gentrification where minority culture is pushed out as more money flows in.

Emerald Pina's curator insight, May 25, 2015 11:15 AM

The article talks about a restaurant called Fish In The NeighborHood, with emphasis on Hood, that has not been affected by the gentrification that has happened in the area. He still refers to the area as "Hood" even with all the newly built building. The article also describes the process of the gentrification, and people's opinions on the name of the restaurant compared to the area.

 

This article relates to Unit 7: Cities and Urban Land Use because it explains the idea and process of gentrification. It gives an example of how some buildings are unaffected by the gentrified area. 

Savannah Rains's curator insight, May 27, 2015 2:50 AM

this article is taking the time to plainly spell out what gentrification is and where it is happening. Gentrification means the taking of lowe class land and making it more valuable to try and boost the overall way of life in that area. Most people are blind to this system and should take the time to learn about it. 

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Infographic: United States of the Environment

Infographic: United States of the Environment | Education in the world | Scoop.it

I must admit I was surprised at many of the states on here. I lived in Indiana for 35 years and I certainly did not think it was very “trashy”. I was also surprised at Rhode Island’s. I wonder why breast cancer is so high here.


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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, September 22, 2014 3:11 PM

Rhode Island excels at having the lowest CO2 emissions. This makes a lot of sense when you consider the characteristics the State as it relates to pollution. Manufacturing is not a large part of Rhode Island's production, therefore CO2 emissions from factories is less than many other states. Furthermore CO2 from automobiles is low because of the small size of the state. Commutes for people working and living in Rhode Island are no longer than an hour each way. The minimal drive time for each person also cuts down possible emissions. 

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, November 1, 2014 8:41 PM

This fun and interactive map shows where each state excel and where they falter. Its interesting to see that in a state a small as Rhode Island, it has the highest rate of breast cancer in the nation. And the state of Colorado has the most avalanche deaths, which when you think of the state of Colorado, you wouldn't think of Colorado as a state with a lot of avalanches. What really surprised me  was Alaska as having the most airports per capita. One wouldn't think this of Alaska since it is a state covered mostly with snow. And it raises the question as to how many people travel in and out of the state. With all of the states surprises, one thing that shocked me a bit was how much organic food is grown in this land. That's one thing that is surprising. I once viewed this land as a of imports of just about everything, but looking at these two maps have changed my outlook of this land.

Brian Wilk's curator insight, January 24, 2015 10:12 PM

Scary to look at the New England region as five of the six states are highest in a form of cancer.Is there a causal connection that should be investigated? Probably doesn't help we live next door to NY and NJ, highest in air pollution and most Superfund sites respectively. As a parent with a son who has autism, I feel for the folks in Ohio. Both California and Florida get the "duh" award for leading in smog and boating wrecks.

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Gaza ceasefire announced in Cairo

Gaza ceasefire announced in Cairo | Education in the world | Scoop.it

Truce between Israel and Hamas announced by Egyptian foreign minister and US secretary of state. They are supposed to stop firing at 9:00 p.m.  It does not address secutity issues and is more of a truce. 

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History of Israel and Palestine in VERY Easy To Understand Maps

History of Israel and Palestine in VERY Easy To Understand Maps | Education in the world | Scoop.it

I really enjoyed this sight. The maps made it easier to understand and see what is happened/is happing with Israel and Palestine. I feel as though the visual made a bigger impact on me than just reading about this area. It made me connect and feel for the Palestines and their loss of land over time in away reading about it did not

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In Venezuela Housing Crisis, Squatters Find 45-Story Walkup

In Venezuela Housing Crisis, Squatters Find 45-Story Walkup | Education in the world | Scoop.it

It is amazing that these people all came together to build their own community in the unfinished building. I commend them for helping each other out and trying to make the best of the situation and to use the resources like this building to be able to live and care for their families. It is sad though that the government does not work with these people to maybe finish the building


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Maegan Connor's curator insight, December 17, 2013 5:34 PM

The video we watched of the squatters living in an unfinished skyscraper was unlike anything I've ever seen before. In a country with such high population rates and a housing shortage, people have gotten creative and made homes in this 45 story building where they share what would have been office spaces and bathrooms.  Over 2,500 people have moved into the dilapidated skyscraper and made a home out of it for their families. They have rigged electricity that the government does not provide for them and built small stores on almost every floor.  The people have not been evicted because the government of Venezuela knows of the housing shortages, yet does not fix it.  

I feel ashamed that a country with so many oil resources has such high rates of poverty and no one is fixing it.  It shows the corruption in the government through an extreme although innovative example.

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, February 17, 2014 10:46 AM

The problems in Venezuela with housing and the lack of response to the problem by the government has led people to become squatters.  The using of the abandoned buildings was a good idea by the original squatters.  The vacant buildings can house many of the countries it is a shame that the government did not think of this solution to the housing problem and vacant building first, if they had, they could have made sure they were safer for the residence.  The idea of a vertical city springing up in this building is also an interesting one.  Not only are squatters living in these buildings but creating businesses and other services for the residence.

Jess Deady's curator insight, February 18, 2014 1:02 PM

In life, I constantly find myself comparing situations with what I read and what I know. Imagine this skyscraper is the Prudential in Boston. How could something meant to be so great fall to its death (and to peoples literal deaths)? One day there is a massive financial building occupied with bankers and lavishness. The next day there is a skyscraper in the form of a house. Housing shortages are happening everywhere and Venezuela is being hit hard in this situation. Imagine visiting this country and asking where someone lives? "Oh, I live in the Tower of David, which used to mean a whole lot more."

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Brazilian Ethanol

Brazilian Ethanol | Education in the world | Scoop.it

To many times we put our convenience and cost before the environment. To me this is yet another example. With all the technology out there it is still me start looking at ways to bring down cost without killing the world.

 

 


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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 8, 2014 11:25 AM

Brazil is taking advantage of its natural resources to make themselves competitive in the global market. Today geography can change the shape of the economics around the globe. The prospect of economic growth and energy competitiveness has made them short sighted.  Brazil has to beware of becoming a mono-commodity country that relies on a business that is not sustainable.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 14, 2014 7:35 PM

While only Brazil is taking part in this and it hasn't completely replaced gasoline it is without a doubt a step in the right direction that hopefully other nations can learn from. While the hypotheses over how much oil fluctuates it is undeniable it isn't a permanent solution, the future of fuel must lie in renewal resources. Unfortunately oil companies hold so much sway in politics its unknown how much change is actually possible today. Regardless of this hopefully one day the world as a whole will realize this and seek to emulate Brazil's in innovation.

Taylor S's curator insight, March 23, 2016 7:58 PM

It is being said that the use of Brazilian, sugarcane produced ethanol is an effective means of self-sustainable energy, more officiant then the corn produced products. the reason this relates to my 5 year plan is due to the proposal that this energy can be used to reduce the emissions given off by different industries and provide clean energy. I believe that this is important as it would reduce the type of impact these organisations have on the environment.

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In Honduras, Police Accused Of Corruption, Killings

I had no idea Honduras was worse it terms of violence then Mexico. How sad for the people of Honduras that the people who are supposed to protect them are adding to the violence. It is sad how the Unites States is playing into it buy giving aid to the police. We here in the US often wonder why people in other countries do not like us. I can see how this would anger and upset that people of Honduras who do not feel safe in their own country because of the corruption with the ploice


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Paige Therien's curator insight, February 11, 2014 1:36 PM

Honduras' role in the drug trafficking industry has increased immensely which does not mix well with their already corrupt government and police force.  However, a history of U.S. aid and security "support" is what rooted this country in violence.  Honduras' situation is spiraling out of control because the drug trafficking industry has taken advantage of its already weak state.

Amy Marques's curator insight, February 12, 2014 10:55 PM

In the news we sometimes hear about violence taking place at the border of the US and Mexico, but you never hear of the violence in Honduras. With a mix of drug trafficking, corruption, political instability and history has led to a murder rate that is now four times that of Mexico., which is pretty hard to think of since there Mexico already has a high muder right. The situation has gotten so bad that the Peace Corps has withdrawn its volunteers.

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, September 24, 2015 6:53 AM

While Mexico gets all the bad press when it comes to violence and police corruption, Honduras is actually a  more violent place to be. The murder rate in the nation is four times that of Mexico. Like Mexico, the rule of law in Honduras is quite questionable. Most of the nations police force is corrupt. Many police officers are  on the payrolls of drug lords and gangs. Average citizens have no respect for law enforcement, which they view as an extension of the drug trade. A country without  the rule of law, will descend into anarchy. This situation is playing out in Honduras, to the detriment of its people.

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Interactive maps Mexico-USA migration channels

Interactive maps  Mexico-USA migration channels | Education in the world | Scoop.it

I was surprised to see Chicago listed as #1 on this map, not somewhere in California or Texas. Although I am not surprised to see it listed in the top cities. Living near Chicago all my life I am aware of Chicago’s very large Hispanic population. Mexican culture plays a huge roll in Chicago and the Hispanic population is a very important part of the community. Unlike other cities they are not a minority in Chicago. There are many Hispanics involved in politics, and community programs.


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Alexa Earl's curator insight, March 14, 2015 1:05 PM

This is a good representation of chain migration.

Devyn Hantgin's curator insight, April 3, 2015 1:46 PM

Migration

This map show the most popular migratory flows of migration from Mexico to the US. 

This ties into our unit about migration because many Mexicans migrate to the US every year. This map shows the patterns and paths of the migration. 

Lindsay Hoyt's curator insight, June 26, 11:32 PM

Gives a visual of migration trends and can connect to current events or historical events.

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Drug war sparks exodus of affluent Mexicans

Drug war sparks exodus of affluent Mexicans | Education in the world | Scoop.it

I wonder why these people do not move to other areas of Mexico or try to help solve the drug issues going on. I do understand wanting to be safe however they are most likely in nicer areas unaffected by the drugs. It is sad when poorer people are choosing to stay in Mexico and not come to the United States and build and grown their own country that the wealthy would up and leave it.

 


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Amy Marques's curator insight, February 12, 2014 1:22 PM

Despite Mexico making improvements to make Mexicans want to stay below the border. The drug trafficking violence does make people want to leave. Tens of thousands of well-off Mexicans, wealthy businessmen and average Mexicans are fleeing Mexico and have moved north of the border in a quiet exodus, and they're being warmly welcomed, unlike the much larger population of illegal immigrants. Mexicans are fleeing cartel wars that have left more than 37,000 Mexicans dead in just 4 years, 

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 29, 2014 2:12 PM

This article is interesting because we were used to seeing poorer immigrants from Mexico looking for work and a new way of life.  However, the more affluent communities are migrating North to the U.S. and legally because of the turmoil of the drug wars in their country.  It is disappointing to see that drugs, violence and murder are pushing away people from their own country

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 3, 2014 1:23 PM

For more affluent Mexicans the ability to migrate north is much easier than for the poor. They have the money and the skills to move into the United States. Also with the open lines of communication and ease of flux with business over the border make moving to the U.S. an excellent way to avoid being caught in the cross fire among drug cartels. For the poor however they are either forced to find work with the cartel or risk being an innocent bystander. It also makes you think about the terminology we use to describe Mexican immigrants, are they not refugees of this drug war?

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U.S. Obesity Trends

U.S. Obesity Trends | Education in the world | Scoop.it

It would be interesting to see the number of fast food places in each state and to compare them with the obesity rates. That of course bring up the question. Are they obese because of the fast food or is the fast food there because people eat it.


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Joshua Choiniere's comment, September 18, 2012 3:01 PM
According to this map obesity occurs all over but is more highly concentrated in the South and Mid West area such as Illinios and Michican. While states in the heartland have no "recorded data" and thus there trying to say they are not obese. I think this map is biased and not accurate because it's implied message is that Americans are not truly obese.
Paige McClatchy's curator insight, September 15, 2013 9:15 PM

The section about obesity and socioeconomic status was the most interesting to me, specifically that richer non-Hispanic blacks are more likely to be obese than their poorer counterparts while wealtheir women tend to be skinnier than poorer women. I've always understood obesity to be a problem largely driven by the nutrition of low-cost foods (McDonalds, KFC, etc.) yet these two statistics seem to contradict each other and require I take a more nuanced look at the epidemic. The fact that the South and the Midwest are leading the data in most obese does not come as a surprise to me. Stereotypes of Southern fried chicken and biscuits are coming to mind while my own experience of the Minnesota State Fair (everything on a stick!) makes the statistics jive with my own mindset. 

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Europe's failure to integrate Muslims

Europe's failure to integrate Muslims | Education in the world | Scoop.it

Although I feel people should be respectul of other cultures, religions and differenaces I also think that no one group should be given special treatment. Are other religious groups given prayer time at public schools? Are other people restriced from wearing religious articals if they have a public job? If countries are singling out Muslims thenI think the proublem is the countries however if Muslims are demanding special treatment then they are at fault.


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Geography Jordan & Danielle's curator insight, February 7, 2014 1:18 PM

Religion: freedom of religion is not a law is some parts of Europe 

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, October 23, 2014 8:59 PM

The Muslim community was never really accepted in Europe looking back in history. Now more and emigrating and in mass numbers in certain areas.  While the European Union is a stronghold keeping Europe together, the argument can be made that the countries are falling apart in terms of identity, economy and production. A new wave of immigrants will not help increase their national identity and strength.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, September 9, 2015 2:58 PM

I feel that the rejection of any attempt to integrate Islam into European society is, at least in part, a reaction to the declining native population of most of the major Western European nations. They are attempting to keep anyone they cant assimilate out, while insuring that any Muslims that they can assimilate are dressing and acting close enough to the existing culture so as to blend into their native population.

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Viewfinder: Gaza's Tunnels

I was very impressed by these tunnels and how they get items through them. I was even more impressed when the shop keeper showed and talked about the larger items that go through the tunnel like the refriderator!


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Al Picozzi's curator insight, October 22, 2013 12:09 AM

Amazing to see what people will do to survive.  They are doing this out of necessity.  Many goods they are smuggling are what I believe should be allowed in through normal means, food, water, medicine and anything needed for basic human needs.  I understand the blockade in stopping weapons and items of that nature, but stopping basic foodstuffs is just plain wrong.  The people are living and surviving by these tunnels and built an economy on them.  One thing that was really interesting was at the end when the man seemed he wanted the blockcade to go on or else it would close his tunnel and he would have to get "a real job."  The effects of this blockcade are on both ends of the spectrum, people want it to end so things can return to normal and others want it to go on to continue to make money.

Brett Sinica's curator insight, October 29, 2013 4:20 PM

What some media has led the "western world" to perceive is that many of the people living here would be trying to smuggle illegal goods such as bombs, drugs, etc.  Sure that may be true in some cases, but many times there are respectable citizens which simply need food or necessary items to sustain their lives.  Because of the tight security measures regarding people and goods, the people of Gaza simply try to find a way around the authorities, and the best current option is by tunnels.  Situations like this show that if people really need certain things, with some help and determination, they can achieve that goal.  In the end, hopefully it is for good more often than bad.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2014 12:09 PM

These tunnels give the Palestinians a way to access a world that has been politically blockaded from them. Connections that allow the sharing of goods are not something that should be avoided. Food and goods could be a way to make a pseudo peace and interdependence between both sides of a centuries old conflict.

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"Pink Slime" - Mechanically Separated Meat

"Pink Slime" - Mechanically Separated Meat | Education in the world | Scoop.it

It is sad and upsetting that our government will okay this type of "meat" and other man made and GMO foods but will not allow the sale of raw milk do to safety concerns. Farmers are not longer run by famers but corporations. After seeing this news report when it originally came out I began to read the labels of everything I was buying at the store and eating and I was shocked to see how much of what I was eating was not real food. Lables that say all natural can and often do contain items we would not consider natural like GMO's. Their is no government regulation on these labels only organic ones contain no GMOs. :-(


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Amy Marques's curator insight, February 12, 2014 12:56 PM

Even though this article was published last year, It is still a serious issue with the meat supply in North America. As discussed in class, only 2% of the work force is involved with agriculture. One of the primary reasons for migrating on the East coast, and Middle of the country, was because of its climate and soil, perfect for growing crops. Over the years our country has taken a serious turn with our food. We are trying to produce more food per worker and square foot of land and its only hurting us. This pink slime, ammonia-treated meat is treated in the first place so it kills any trace of ecoli. Which comes from cattle eating too much corn, which is what the cows in the country are fed, when their bodies are designed to eat grass, not corn. However, the US has lots of corn and so here raises a question, do we take care of our animals, give them enough grass to eat and sell Americans healthy beef? The answer is no, our food supply is a corporation burgers have to be sold and therefore the issue contines... 

Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s curator insight, March 6, 2014 12:31 PM

I feel, generally speaking, that this is a result of our over-consumption of meat. If there wasn't such a high demand for meat these companies might not be looking into these sorts of alternative uses for these meat-like byproducts. The secondary reason for this is the negligence of personal accountability by officials and high paid USDA administrators that lack empathy and understanding of nutrition.

Shane C Cook's curator insight, May 27, 2015 4:41 AM

Oh boy I remember when I learned about this. "Pink Slime" is a huge problem. Schools use it because it is cheap but it lacks nutritional value which is extremely unhealthy for kids whom buy lunch from school.

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Understanding a Rhode Island Accent

As someone who just moved to Rhode Island from the Midwest I found this video to be very funny. I have to admit I had to ask people more then once to repeat what they were saying because I could not understand them. How ever it is not just the way that Rhode Islanders say things but also the terms they use. When I first went shopping the lady asked if I wanted the item in my carriage. I had no idea what she was talking about. In the Midwest it is called a cart. Also the first time I had someone ask me where the bubbler was I had no clue what they where talking about.


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John Peterson's comment, February 2, 2012 5:13 PM
Sadly this is a very good representation of a true Rhode Island accent, speaking from past experiences with my own family.
Em Marin's comment, February 2, 2012 5:27 PM
he used to teach in my highschool
Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, January 29, 2014 3:34 PM

This funny video highlights how phonetically different words are in different dialects.  This is focused on the sound of the Rhode Island accent and it was interesting to see how the words were spelled when written phonetically.

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Israel - Gaza conflict

Israel - Gaza conflict | Education in the world | Scoop.it
Israeli airstrikes began November 14, following months of Palestinian rocket fire into Israel.

 

"Monday, the top leader of Hamas dared Israel to launch a ground invasion of Gaza and dismissed diplomatic efforts to broker a cease-fire in the six-day-old conflict, as the Israeli military conducted a new wave of deadly airstrikes which included a second hit on a 15-story building that houses media outlets."  This photo essay shows 34 powerful images that are emerging from this deadly conflict.  If students need some background to understand who are the major players in this conflict, this glossary should be helpful. 


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Wen Shi's curator insight, July 13, 2014 4:17 AM

I was so shocked while reading this ariticle and seeing those pictures. The conflict between the Palestinians and Israelis is something that is deeply rooted in the history of the two nations. And the war, resulted by this conflict, has taken away many people's lives. The 2 countries's people are suffering. Many kids are just at our ages, they could not get education or anything else that we take for granted here, even had to bear the pain of losing relatives and homes. I could never imagine how sad and disastrous wars can be. :(

Hossan Epiques Novelle's curator insight, July 13, 2014 4:58 AM

The two countries should take the chance to resolve the conflict amicably before the situation tips over and war is inevitable. The loss of lives resulting from the war would be pointless.

Zhiyang Liang's curator insight, July 13, 2014 12:02 PM

In my perspective, why does people will have a thought of eliminating prejudice is that prejudice can lead to unfair treatment or the violation of rights of individuals or groups of people just like the conflict between Israel and Gaza.